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Texas Cops Spent 11 Minutes Searching a Woman's Vagina, Found No Drugs

Harris County deputies were initially indicted for the "offensive and shocking" search, but those charges were dropped last week.

Image courtesy Sam CammackImage courtesy Sam CammackCharnesia Corley was a 21-year-old college student with no criminal record when two cops from the Harris County Sheriff's Office stopped her in June 2015 for running a red light.

After searching her car, police claimed to have found .02 ounces of marijuana. That was enough, they apparently felt, to justify a full-body cavity search. When Corley refused to remove her clothes in the dimly lit parking lot where she was being detained, one of the officers threw her to the ground, pushed her partially underneath her own car, and yanked Corley's pants down to her ankles. For the next 11 minutes, dash cam video of the incident shows, she was held down by two officers while being searched. Corley claims that fingers repeatedly probed her vagina and that the officers ignored her protests. A third officer stood nearby holding a flashlight. No drugs were found on Corley's person.

Sam Cammack, an attorney representing Corley in a multi-million-dollar civil rights lawsuit against the county, calls the search "rape by cop."

"It is undoubted that they sexually assaulted her," Cammack says. "They put their fingers inside her vagina. You can't pull someone over, think you might find something, and do that to them."

The full dash-cam video was released to the Houston Chronicle and can be viewed here. It appears to confirm Corley's side of the story, showing officers putting her in handcuffs, tossing her to the ground, removing her pants, and spending several long minutes searching her body.

Two of the officers who conducted the search, William Strong and Ronaldine Pierre, were indicted in June 2016 by a Harris County grand jury on charges of official oppression, but those charges were dropped last week.

"These officers did commit a crime, and now it appears they are not being held accountable for their actions," says Cammack, who wants an independent prosecutor assigned to the case. He says he plans to release dash-cam video of the traffic stop to the media in the hopes of generating enough public outcry to force the county to reopen the case with a new prosecutor.

Corley and Cammack appeared on CNN last night to tell their side of the story to host Don Lemon.

Police initially said Corley consented to the search, but they also charged her with resisting arrest and with possession of marijuana. Harris County prosecutors dropped the charges against Corley in August 2015 and issued a statement calling the search "offensive and shocking."

The Harris County District Attorney's office did not return calls from Reason, but county prosecutor Natasha Sinclair told the Houston TV station KRIV that "no one in this office stands by the search the way it happened," but she also said the officers' "bad judgement" might not rise to the level of criminal offense.

The DA's office told KRIV that it dropped the charges against Strong and Pierre after "new evidence" became available and was presented to a second grand jury, different from the one that voted to indict the officers last year. Because grand jury proceedings are secret, that additional evidence has not been released to the public.

Cammack says he does not believe that a second grand jury has the authority to overrule a grand jury that lawfully charged the two officers.

Cedric Collier, a spokesman for the Harris County Sheriff's Office, confirmed to Reason on Monday that Strong and Pierre are still employed by the department. The two had been placed on administrative duty during the grand jury investigation, Collier said, though he was unsure if their status had changed since the charges were dropped last week. Collier declined to comment on the call for an independent prosecutor, and he said the department is "reviewing our policies and procedures" involving traffic stops and searches.

Whether or not the officers who searched Corley's vagina for more than 10 minutes ever face criminal prosecution, there seems to be little question that the search violated the federal Constitution, state law, and Harris County Sheriff's Office protocol.

A body cavity search without a warrant is a "blatant violation of the Fourth Amendment," Rebecca Robertson, legal and policy director of the Texas ACLU, told the Houston Chronicle in a 2015 article about the incident. Robertson could not imagine a circumstance where a roadside cavity search would be considered constitutional. Protocol for the Harris County Sheriff's Office calls for suspects to be arrested and taken to a substation if a body cavity search must be performed, the Chronicle reported. There a microwave scanner is used for non-intrusive searches.

As if more clarity is needed on the issue, the Texas state legislature in 2015 passed a law specifying that "a peace officer may not conduct a body cavity search of a person during a traffic stop unless the officer first obtains a search warrant pursuant to this chapter authorizing the body cavity search." The bill—passed in response to public outcry over several high-profile incidents of roadside body cavity searches, including one in Harris County where a woman claimed that male troopers laughed while a female officer conducted a body cavity search on her—was signed into law just weeks before the Harris County officers strip-searched Corley.

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  • timbo||

    I'm becoming a cop.

    If you find drugs, that's like hitting the lottery twice.

  • BestUsedCarSales||

    I'm just impressed he lasted 11 minutes in there. That's 20 times longer than my best.

  • Elias Fakaname||

    It must have been........roomy.

  • TangoDelta||

    If not before, certainly afterward.

  • Liberty Lover||

    Roomy? Hell it must have been like the Grand Canyon. Then again, maybe the cop had an extremely small "search tool"!

  • MSimon||

    The rights of the police were violated.

  • $park¥ leftist poser||

    I feel safer already.

  • timbo||

    These savages deserve to go to federal rape me in that ass prison.

    How is this not the lead story on the news?

  • Rhywun||

    Because it happened over two years ago and the DA helpfully waited for the story to fade away before proclaiming the hero innocent.

  • Brubaker||

    The charges were dropped just last week.

  • Zeb||

    What, are we not doing woodchippers anymore?

  • Finrod||

    The woodchipper punishment has been delegated to the private sector.

  • Ariki||

    Which ass? That ass? Do I get to choose?

  • timbo||

    Sounds like rape to me.

  • Palin's Buttplug||

    Just a little pussy-grabbing. Nothing any petty tyrant wouldn't do.

  • Hank Phillips||

    In New York cops gang up and kill black people over a cigarette... ("I can't breathe"). So Houston cops figure they can at least rape them over a throwdown joint.

  • Half-Virtue, Half-Vice||

    Palin, the reason I don't respect you is because you are so ideologically dogmatic that you are fine conflating an ugly phrase to literal rape just to fire petty pot shots -- I find that completely without principle or honor.

  • Tony||

    "The guy who grabs pussies against women's will, however--presidential material."

  • MSimon||

    Only if he imagines it. And then talks.

  • sasob||

    As I understood it, it wasn't exactly against their will - just without their explicit invitation or request.

  • Bill||

    Can't be sure, but it seems that Tony and Palin think that it is ok that this happened since Trump was elected? (And not by libertarians, so not sure why you would post that crap on this website).

  • Elias Fakaname||

    No Tony, they let him grab them. That's what gold digging models do. You're just jealous that Trumo won't grab YOUR pussy.

  • Jury Nullification||

    "Sounds like rape to me."

    Agreed as she only gave consent and not cuntsent. A distinction with a difference.

    Date rape ain't got nothing on state rape.

  • timbo||

    I'm thinking the two cops, the police chief, the attorney, and possibly the judge should be brought up on charges for this. How on earth are the two cops still employed?

  • Hank Phillips||

    According to Thomas Jefferson: "For protecting them, by a mock Trial from punishment for any Murders which they should commit on the Inhabitants of these States:..."

  • Agammamon||

    "no one in this office stands by the search the way it happened," but she also said the officers' "bad judgement" might not rise to the level of criminal offense.

    But they stand by the search itself - they have to, their paychecks depend on enforcing the whims of a political elite no matter what.

    Stuff like this is why I no longer believe there are any good cops at all. Sure, a lot of cops do good things, and those good things are countered every time they enforce vice laws or laws passed 'for your own good'. The job of the police is first and foremost to enforce the diktats of an influential minority - even if those diktats are monstrous - maintain public *order* (ie, enforce submission to the state) second, and public safety last.

  • some guy||

    Also, how could a good person continue to serve alongside these rapists? On principle you'd have to resign or at least refuse to report for duty until these guys were at least suspended and charged. Otherwise you're complicit and a bad cop.

  • Wizard4169||

    Genuinely good cops don't last long. They either quit in disgust or get fired or pressured to resign when they refuse to play ball. This leaves only actively bad cops who routinely abuse and brutalize people, and passively bad cops who tolerate this abuse by their brothers in blue. I'd like to believe that actively bad cops are a small minority, with passively bad cops only tolerating them out of a misguided sense of solidarity. But then I keep hearing stories like this one, and I become ever more convinced that you need at least a touch of psychopathy to make a career in law enforcement.

  • Elias Fakaname||

    "Ten percent of the cops in New York City are absolutely corrupt, 10 percent are absolutely honest, and the other 80 percent — they wish they were honest."

    Frank Serpico, testifying to the Knapp commission on corruption in the NYPD in 1970.

  • Rhywun||

    Stuff like this is why I no longer believe there are any good cops at all.

    Sometimes I slip back into "a few bad apples" mode and then stories like this come along and bring me back to reality.

  • NotAnotherSkippy||

    Have all judgements taken out of police pension funds. Maybe then they'll start paying attention to their bad apples.

  • Rhywun||

    My mayor is using the city treasury to defend himself against various corruption lawsuits. I'm sure he'll get right on police reform any day now.

  • Bill||

    Sounds like she would be ok with someone attempting a citizen's arrest by searching her cavities
    for 11 minutes. If they said they were looking for drugs, it would be justified, right?

  • generalisimo14||

    You belong to the state, deal with it, or do something about it.

  • Elias Fakaname||

    I've suggested cleansing America if the progtards. Everyone here reacts like I'm the bad guy. Yet if there were no progtards, there would be no progtardedness. Including all these stupid fucking unnecessary laws.

  • Hugh Akston||

    I'm not convinced that it matters whether or not the cops found drugs on Corley.

  • some guy||

    I seem to recall there being an amendment that makes this kind of search illegal. I could be wrong. I'm not lawyer...

  • Hicks||

    There is a law, and if you get caught doing something like this, you're looking at serious time.
    But it obviously doesn't apply to Law Enforcement.

  • Fuck you, Shikha (Nunya)||

    Serious time... Behind a desk.

  • Libertarian||

    It doesn't matter to thoughtful people, but for the knee-jerk law-and-order types it makes all the difference in the world.

  • sasob||

    I hope they enjoy their taxes being used for settling the lawsuit.

  • Bubba Jones||

    Their actions were a violation of both state law and department policy.

    They should be in jail.

  • Hank Phillips||

    Look at the positive side. Using as precedent the arrest of Timothy Leary for a tiny amount of weed found on his daughter, the Houston PD can now more easily attract child molesters, hand them badges and guns, and turn them loose on the populace. If the British Crown and Houston judges can protect murderers by mock trial, as in the Declaration of Independence and the Joe Campos Torres case, why not also enlist child molesters as Prohibition Enforcers?

  • Hicks||

    Well, it would get the "criminals" off the street and lower the crime rate.

  • sasob||

    Joe Campos Torres. How come nobody ever remembers Randy Webster anymore?

  • NotAnotherSkippy||

    Two grand juries? Because we didn't like the outcome of the first? I'm not a fan of DOJ civil rights investigations because they usually violate double jeopardy but if this case doesn't qualify I don't know what would.

  • Zeb||

    Grand juries don't do criminal trials, so I don't think that a grand jury investigation puts you in jeopardy of life or limb.

    Just my guess as to why it's considered legal.

  • NotAnotherSkippy||

    My phrasing wasn't entirely clear.

    Yes, grand juries don't have the double jeopardy issue. I generally don't like DOJ civil rights investigations because they frequently DO have double jeopardy issues (and yes I know it's been ruled constitutional, so has the penaltax). But in this case, since double jeopardy isn't an issue, this is the poster child for a civil rights prosecution.

  • Zeb||

    Ah, I see what you meant.

  • Tom Bombadil||

    Can .02 of an ounce be seen without a microscope?

  • Ron||

    and can you tell the difference between .02 ounce of weed and some clover that got stuck to the bottom of your shoes. Cops have stopped at my friends house multiple times to investigate when they thought his tomato plants were pot plants.

  • Zeb||

    That's half of a gram, which is enough for a joint. So it's more than a speck of leaf on the floor mat or something.

  • Cynical Asshole||

    "These officers did commit a crime, and now it appears they are not being held accountable for their actions," says Cammack, who wants an independent prosecutor assigned to the case.

    Cops held accountable? He must be new.

  • Brandybuck||

    Driving while black in the south. She's lucky she's alive.

  • loveconstitution1789||

    Didn't cops in Minnesota shoot Philando Castile?

    Is that the South?

  • NotAnotherSkippy||

    More the north part of town actually.

  • loveconstitution1789||

    Well, that is not going to help Buck's argument that only racist people who hate non-white people live in the South.

    Imagine if he had to acknowledge that there are many racists on his lefty side.

  • Zeb||

    Buck's argument that only racist people who hate non-white people live in the South

    Well, it's good for him that that's not at all what he said.

  • loveconstitution1789||

    Yes, she is lucky to be alive based on the behavior of gestapo police tactics in Texas which also happens in many "North" places.

  • TangoDelta||

    Once they are indoctrinated into the "war on [insert today's current 'for the children' topic]", hand them military weapons, and relieve them from any form of accountability it is not really a surprise that they turn into jack booted gestapo. Unfortunately no matter how many times Ralph pushes his hair off his face it won't change the fact that Piggy's glasses broke long ago and don't even think about getting hold of the conch.

  • Palatki||

    All i have to say is that she was GODDAM lucky her dog wasn't in the car.

  • Enjoy Every Sandwich||

    11 minutes? Reminds me of the old joke "If you shake it more than twice you're playing with it". Why in the hell would a search of a woman's vagina take 11 minutes?

  • This Machine Chips Fascists||

    Enjoy every illegal search?

  • Libertarian||

    I'm imagining the conversation when a cop's wife sees this article in the news.

    "Eleven minutes?!?!? You only take FIVE minutes with me!"

  • loveconstitution1789||

    They don't kids well in public schools anymore?

  • loveconstitution1789||

    About human anatomy that is.

  • ||

    Didn't this exact scene actually happen in the film Crash (2004) ?

  • sasob||

    Why in the hell would a search of a woman's vagina take 11 minutes?

    Because the bull dyke conducting it was enjoying herself?

  • Libertarian||

    "Cammack says. "They put their fingers inside her vagina. You can't pull someone over, think you might find something, and do that to them.""

    The cops beg to differ.

    What doesn't get said often enough in cases like this is that, with such blatant, willful disregard of civil rights, the chance of this being the first/only instance of such abuse is exactly zero. Such an incident should not only be cause for investigating the cops involved, but cause for a thorough top-down investigation of the entire police department and its unwritten policies.

  • ||

    Yes, the fact that *exactly* this kind of abuse is portrayed in the film 'Crash' (Best Picture 2004) suggests that it's common enough to be considered a "thing".

    Maybe people should take black people seriously when they complain that the police abuse them regularly. Maybe they're not making it up.

  • mysmartstuffs||

    Maybe people should take black people seriously when they complain that the police abuse them regularly. Maybe they're not making it up.


    Any (straw)men around here say that?

    I think what "we" tend to say is that the police abuse everyone. Everyone includes black people.

  • ||

    Maybe people should take black people seriously when they complain that the police abuse them regularly. Maybe they're not making it up.

    I'm curious what does her race have to do with this?

    I haven't researched the story exhaustively, but a glance at the Harris County Sheriff's page show it to be headed by someone named 'Ed Gonzalez' which sounds/appears rather not-exactly-white and Chief Daryl Coleman as well as a few other other deputies appear rather dark skinned to be summarily categorized as 'anti-black'.

    It's pretty clear these officers violated the law/Constitution, so it's not exactly a systemic/historic white guy society-at-large issue and if there is some manner of ant-black rape campaign going on within the department or the state it's exceedingly well orchestrated and has some pretty ethnically diverse players. Almost to the point where any/all races seem to be incidental. It's not like the apprehending deputy could've known who he'd get to search or whom would be doing the cavity searching a priori and, even if he/they did, the dispatcher in charge of it all is a black woman.

  • TangoDelta||

    Who knows, maybe the cop has a fetish and put in the right BDSM "mother may I" to the control queen and got the go ahead.

  • Cynical Asshole||

    "They put their fingers inside her vagina. You can't pull someone over, think you might find something, and do that to them."

    Then what's the point of being a cop if you can't pull random chicks over and finger blast them on the side of the road for over 10 minutes because you found a tiny amount of pot?

    THIS IS WHAT COPS ACTUALLY BELIEVE

  • Bubba Jones||

    Did Dallas get busted for roadside cavity searches just a few years ago?

  • Necron 99||

    Yes, it was a DPS trooper Kelly Helleson. During trial she copped a plea to official oppression. The judge sentenced Helleson to a year in jail, which was suspended. She will serve two years of supervised probation and must pay $1,000 for each of the two convictions.

    DPS has to pay a federal civil rights lawsuit settlement of $180,000

    So yes, a slap on the wrist for the officer, and the tax payers take it up the ass because Helleson had to stick it up an ass.

  • JuanQPublic||

    "What doesn't get said often enough in cases like this is that, with such blatant, willful disregard of civil rights, the chance of this being the first/only instance of such abuse is exactly zero."

    ^^^ Absolutely.

  • Rebel Scum||

    Two of the officers who conducted the search, William Strong and Ronaldine Pierre, were indicted in June 2016 by a Harris County grand jury on charges of official oppression, but those charges were dropped last week.

    Of course they were. The tyranny of the drug war and lack of accountability of gov't agents continues.

  • Zeb||

    I've always found it pretty egregious that they can search inside of someone's body (including drawing blood) even with a warrant, let alone based on "reasonable suspicion" or "probably cause" or whatever they claim. Seems like for something that invasive there should have to be some kind of court proceeding.

  • MSimon||

    It is "probable suspicion."

  • This Machine Chips Fascists||

    "Official oppression" sounds so very mild compared to sexual assault with violence. Is this in the Newspeak dictionary?

  • loveconstitution1789||

    "Official oppression" is a not so horrible name for a classical music group.

  • ||

    All those BLM protestors are just anti-white racists who hate cops. Black people have nothing to complain about. We eliminated racism in the 1970s.

    /alt-right

  • loveconstitution1789||

    All those white people are just anti-black racists who hate non-white people. White people have nothing to complain about. Government has not been able to eliminate racism in the 1960's.

    /Lefty morons

  • Tony||

    White people have nothing to complain about with respect to being white.

    But you're going to complain anyway, aren't you?

  • mysmartstuffs||

    White people have nothing to complain about with respect to being white.


    So there exist literally ZERO things in the set of things one might complain about while being white?

    Since I can trivially think of one ("it would suck to be a white dancer and have people assume you couldn't dance just because you're white") I am thinking you are making a rhetorically unsustainable absolute statement.

    What you're probably trying to say is that there's nothing IMPORTANT to complain about, which just means you're a dickhole who thinks some people's suffering is more real than others. Grow a clue and a heart.

  • Tony||

    Being thought of as a bad dancer is less important than being shot for driving with the wrong skin color. Yes I will make that claim.

  • sasob||

    Maybe you ought to check what color skin Randy Webster had when he was shot dead in Houston years ago and a throw-down gun planted. Maybe you ought to check out my younger brother's skin color when he was ruffed up and arrested for verbally protesting the ticket he got when some moron pulled out of a parking lot and hit the side of his truck as he was driving by. Maybe you ought to check out what mine was the several times in my life I've been threatened with bodily harm by some motherfucking thug with a badge and a gun.

    Most cops don't give a shit what color you are unless it's blue.

  • Cy||

    ^ This.

    Thugs and assholes acting like thugs and assholes isn't because you're a special class of victim. We're all victims of this shit.

  • Elias Fakaname||

    Tony, you're a racist piece of shit. Why is that?

  • sasob||

    Tony doesn't believe in absolutes - sustainable or otherwise. In fact, in one of his more honest moments, he'd probably claim there are no absolutes - all the while ignoring the fact that such a claim is an absolute.

  • granite state destroyer||

    "it would suck to be a white dancer and have people assume you couldn't dance just because you're white"

    Like who? John Travolta? Justin Timberlake? Fred Astaire? White men who can dance well are recognized as good dancers. Most Northern European men are just not good dancers.

    You would be on stronger ground arguing for bias against white basketball players or running backs...

  • Dead inside||

    Ever been to Appalachia?

  • ||

    We eliminated racism in the 1970s.

    Did the alt-right say that?

    My impression is/was that there's more than enough non-racial violence to go around and/or that focusing on race ignores other more intrinsic and life threatening problems.

    I mean, the same weekend as the protests in Charlottesville, half a dozen people of a couple of races were killed in Chicago and, unlike Charlottesville, their killers will never be apprehended nor any motives known.

    Other than opportunism, why is race even an issue here? Certainly we should know the ID of the deputies involved in the story, but Texas is a big and rather diverse place (as far as big places go) presumably there's a chance a black deputy either pulled the suspect over, performed the body cavity search, or both.

    If the cops in Texas and alt-right are waging a roadside rape campaign to drive black people from TX, they certainly seem to be doing a poor job of things on a couple of fronts.

  • ||

    'non-racial violence' is the wrong term, racially agnostic is a better descriptor.

  • Enjoy Every Sandwich||

    Police are part of the government. Just wanted to remind the resident Progs of that.

  • Cy||

    But everything will be utopia as soon as we put the government in charge of every aspect of our lives. Just look at all of the mass graves that prior governments have installed across the world. I'm sure it was all in the plan. Utopia... Kumbai... All is well... All equal...

  • ||

    Once we finish the war on drugs... get rid of all those scumbags... then we can focus on those racist mutherfucking scumbags.

    It's funny how much the racist/anti-racist rhetoric mirrors the ME, with it's minor shades of ethnic and religious selectivity that fuel the violent tribalism.

  • Diane Reynolds (Paul.)||

    This is merely proof there's not enough of it

  • Half-Virtue, Half-Vice||

    When cops die, I don't cry.

  • shortviking||

    Particularly traffic cops.

  • Bubba Jones||

    I like the boldness of their claim that she consented. They should be tried for perjury.

  • Chuckles_the_Snarky_Piggy||

    If she consented to vaginal insertion, they should have charged her with prostitution as well, yes?

    The DAs love to have extra charges to coerce the plea deal.

    /sarc

  • Alsø alsø wik||

    On that note, pretend and/or stipulate that everything the cops did, up to and including the cavity search, was actually legal. What justifies 11 minutes of cavity searching though? I mean, are there secret compartments? An average runner can log a mile and half in 11 minutes. I've had oil changes finished in less.

    The duration alone is cause to charge them with sexual assault.

  • sasob||

    Either consent or get charged with resisting arrest.

  • NoVaNick||

    I say we replace the locked up drug offenders with these "bad apple" cops and overzealous prosecutors. But hey, if you are a cop, you are immune from the law. The sad thing is that my 4 year old son worships the police and always gets excited when he sees a cop or police car. I will one day explain to him that not all cops are awesome, but will let him enjoy thinking that way for a few more years.

  • Verbum Vincet||

    You may wanna reconsider postponing that conversation. At this rate, we likely won't have "a few more years." The groundwork for tyranny has been expertly laid over the past few decades, and some "event" is guaranteed to send this tyranny into hyperdrive.

  • Duke of url||

    Roadside body cavity searches!!

    For when merely planting drugs, just doesn't give sadistic control freaks the power rush and errection like it used to.

    These RAPISTS need to be hunted down.

  • DFG||

    Even if they had found something in her, what would have been the charge? Misdemeanor possession? That's not even a jailable offence is it? What sort of quantity could you possible have up a bodily orifice that could justify this sort of violation? Do they really think they are going to nail a major drug kingpin doing bullshit like this? What is the point? Is it really about doing it just because they can? I guess so.

  • Cy||

    It was a clear cut case of rape. Let's not try to take away from that by over analyzing it.

  • Jgalt1975||

    Even if they had found something in her, what would have been the charge? Misdemeanor possession? That's not even a jailable offence is it?

    Right, but (1) the Supreme Court has ruled that you can be arrested and taken to jail to be processed even for offenses that carry no jail time and (2) that the police can search people who are being arrested to make sure they don't have weapons on them, so logically they needed to check her vagina not just for drugs, but things like a handgun or a Bowie knife that she might have been hiding in there too.

  • Elias Fakaname||

    "(2) that the police can search people who are being arrested to make sure they don't have weapons on them, so logically they needed to check her vagina not just for drugs, but things like a handgun or a Bowie knife that she might have been hiding in there too."

    Perhaps even an AR15, or a bazooka.

  • Myk||

    It's Texas. I heard of someone spending the night in jail over .25g, literally dust in a jar. Probably not even enough to test.

  • Elias Fakaname||

    If it were Kansas they would be trying to paint them as a kingpin of a drug cartel over that amount.

  • Intelligent Mr Toad||

    Business is looking up!

  • PDA||

    I find this so hard to believe because if this ever happened to my daughter I'd kill so damn many cops they'd lower flags to half mast all across our decaying nation.

  • Duke of url||

    They're so dedicated, they will heroically rape someone, just
    to save you from all the consequences of a private citizen possessing plant matter!

    It's called serving and protecting!

    When is their award ceremony!?

  • John C. Randolph||

    That's rape, aggravated assault, and violation of her rights under color of authority. If the prosecutor fails to take this before a jury, he is not a lawman.

    -jcr

  • C. S. P. Schofield||

    But if he does, he probably has to worry that the Police Union nows his home address.

  • Myk||

    But it was pot. People go crazy and play piano on pot. Don't they rape on pot too? Maybe the cops were high.

  • macsnafu||

    Not only was it a rape, but it was the rape of a black woman. Where's BLM and the other outraged liberal groups when you really need them?

  • ||

    She didn't punch the officer in the face and wrestle for the gun so the case isn't dicey enough for BLM. Even if we assume all the officers were Aryan-nation white, it's too clear-cut, plain old abuse of power.

  • pxm||

    Yeah, not nearly nuanced enough to try to pull an Alinsky

  • Diane Reynolds (Paul.)||

    'Collier declined to comment on the call for an independent prosecutor, and he said the department is "reviewing our policies and procedures" involving traffic stops and searches.'

    So make sure 'no raping' is part of the training regimen?

  • JuanQPublic||

    That's exactly what I thought when I read it too. Repugnant on every level.

  • Elias Fakaname||

    I'm certain they MUST have a 'don't be rapin' ' policy in their procedure manual.

  • AD-RtR/OS!||

    They should have used a Roomba to map it out.

  • Uncle Jay||

    RE: Texas Cops Spent 11 Minutes Searching a Woman's Vagina, Found No Drugs
    Harris County deputies were initially indicted for the "offensive and shocking" search, but those charges were dropped last week.

    It took eleven minutes to search a woman's vagina for drugs?
    Jesus Christ!
    Her pussy must be the size of the Grand Canyon.

  • Eman||

    This is just female fragility. Who hasn't had a police officer's hand down their pants?

  • Popsiq||

    Or Father Feltis? But that wasn't 'right', was it?

  • Popsiq||

    My first thought was this a white woman? My second thought, No. I was right. Only in America - and a few other 'black holes' that America thinks should be 'invaded' .

  • حظك اليوم||

    Great post , thanks for sharing

  • gordo53||

    Hardly a week goes by that there isn't a piece in the news about some egregious police action. How much longer will the public tolerate this crap? Is it possible that at some point ordinary people will confuse a police uniform with a rifle target? Let's hope not.

  • m.EK||

    Didn't they commit a Constitutional crime?
    They swore or affirmed the Oath of Office didn't they?
    The first 10 Amendments spell out what the federal government, their employees, and contractors CAN'T do.
    The Civil Case should strip the governmental "agents" of all their property and possessions. The criminal case should allow them to reconsider their "authority" while in a prison cell. Assault is assault, regardless of how pretty your costume is.
    Once you are "under arrest", you are in the governments care. Harm is not allowed. She was probably raped while being "detained".
    Administrative leave?

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