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Wave Farewell to Terrible Florida Prosecutor Angela Corey

Much maligned and noted for her viciousness, she joins a rare trend of voters ousting attorneys.

Angela CoreyKurt Rivers/ZUMAPRESS/NewscomThe alleged anti-establishment narrative of this election does not seem to be threatening the actual incumbency of most politicians (with the exception of Kansas' Tim Huelskamp, who notably infuriated parts of the conservative establishment). Sens. John McCain and Marco Rubio on the right and Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz on the left all handily won their primaries last night. They could still lose in the general election, but this means that despite the discontent, party voters aren't dumping them.

But there is a surprising anti-incumbency trend playing out this election, and it claimed another victim last night. Angela Corey, the Florida prosecutor probably best noted for her failed attempt in trying to convict George Zimmerman for killing Trayvon Martin, lost her primary race badly to Melissa Nelson (64 percent to 26 percent—a blowout).

But Corey was well-known to criminal justice activists outside of the Zimmerman case, and she had a reputation for pushing for extremely harsh sentences. Reason readers may recall Corey throwing the book at Marissa Alexander, who faced a possible 20-year sentence for firing a gun into the ceiling in order to scare away an abusive husband who had a protective order to stay away. Ultimately Alexander accepted a plea deal that sentenced her to three years in prison, most of which she had already served.

She also had a reputation for being remarkably thin-skinned for somebody whose job it was to convict criminals and for feuds with anybody who had an unkind word for her. Ken "Popehat" White noted her unprofessional, threatening behavior back in 2012 and the Florida Times-Union, when reporting Corey's loss last night, mentioned that the elected official refused to talk to the newspaper at all for a year (probably over criticism like this).

Corey isn't the first prosecutor to lose her primary challenge this year. She wasn't even the only prosecutor to lose a primary challenge last night. Directly south of Corey's districts, State Attorney Jeff Ashton, known for his failed prosecution of Casey Anthony, was also dumped in favor of Aramis Ayala, whose campaign was partially funded by a political action committee that gets money from George Soros.

Earlier in the year, as Ed Krayewski noted, prosecutors in Chicago and Cleveland lost re-election bids. In both of those cases, dissatisfaction with the prosecutors' failures in addressing accusations of police misconduct clearly played a role. Embedded within that frustration is the larger complaint that some people, particularly those in position of authority, are given a pass by peers while poor minorities are crushed by a harsh system that assumes the worst of them.

This is hardly a new complaint about America's system of justice and sentencing laws, but it's a little surprising to actually see it play out in primary elections, particularly given how rare it is for incumbents to be punished. Some law professors weighed in on the trend:

John Pfaff, a law professor at Fordham University: "Corey's defeat tonight continues a small—but important—trend of powerful, incumbent prosecutors losing primary elections for being too aggressive. So far, however, no prosecutor has lost just for being aggressive: those who have been ousted all have also had scandals that contributed, perhaps importantly, to their defeats. Nonetheless, tonight is further evidence that being the toughest prosecutor on the block no longer ensures victory, even in a Republican primary."

Mary Anne Franks, a law professor at the University of Miami: "Corey's loss is an encouraging sign that the public will no longer tolerate overzealous and unprincipled criminal prosecutions, including women and children."

Kenneth Nunn, a law professor at the University of Florida: "For too long, Duval County has been an outlier in its excessive use of the death penalty, its harsh punishment of juveniles, and its reliance on outdated sentencing practices. Today, voters have embraced new leadership and turned the corner towards a State Attorney's Office that the community can trust."

Stephen Harper, a clinical professor at the Death Penalty Clinic and a law professor at Florida International University: "It is refreshing to see a prosecutor who is so overly aggressive defeated in a conservative southern jurisdiction. This goes to show, among other things, that the death penalty is on its way out."

On the other hand, part of celebration of Corey's loss seems tied to the fact that she failed to convict Zimmerman. That's a bit concerning because, despite how awful a person Zimmerman clearly is, there really wasn't enough evidence to suggest that he should have been convicted, as Jacob Sullum previously detailed. The loathsome "He was no angel" narrative when police trot out a person's entire troubled history in order to try to justify a shooting should apply to Zimmerman as much as it does to everybody else. That a person has positions in favor of gun control or is aware of the justice system's terrible treatment of black males isn't an argument for putting Zimmerman in prison. It's just another type of emotional reaction that helps feed a punitive justice system.

Photo Credit: Kurt Rivers/ZUMAPRESS/Newscom

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  • Playa Manhattan.||

    She's ultra-competent. I can tell by just looking at her picture.

  • DEATFBIRSECIA||

    Facts Of Life Stars - You Won't Believe What They Look Like Now!

  • bacon-magic||

    Good one, I guess Trudy is in Baltimore?

  • Radioactive||

    Trudy is Baltimore

  • ||

    Latch Key Kids for the win.

  • [OMITTED]||

    ^^^THIS.

  • ||

    The alleged anti-establishment narrative of this election does not seem to be threatening the actual incumbency of most politicians

    Which is why this nation gets the banana republic it has earned.

  • John Thacker||

    Trump loves the establishment. His voters are more likely to be attracted to celebrity than confirmed alt-righters. Most incumbents are bigger celebrities than their opponents.

  • Lee Genes||

    And another committed public servant prevented from fulfilling their life long dream of serving the people.

  • ||

    serving the people

    Spoiler -- It's a cookbook.

  • John Thacker||

    NRA came out early for Melissa Nelson and against Angela Corey, partially because of Marissa Alexander. That's a big deal in a Republican primary.

    Yes, interestingly last night we had both people who hated Corey for charging Zimmerman at all and people who hated that she failed to get a conviction celebrating her loss. (My thought is that Zimmerman got reasonable doubt of the sort that, yes, most young black males don't get, but that doesn't make me howl for his blood as much as wish that everyone got a fair deal.)

  • ||

    Why would the NRA come out over someone who trespassed and then fired a pistol at the legal resident while their children were in the room? If they wanted justice, they should have come out against the 10-20-Life rule that tied the judge and jury's hand on sentencing someone who fires a gun in the commission of a felony to a 20 year mandatory minimum. Alexander absolutely did commit a felony (aggravated assault) by firing a gun. That was like, Corey's most successful prosecution ever.

  • John Thacker||

    The NRA did come out against 10-20-Life, which as you correctly note, ties the judge and juries hands - thus putting a lot more power and discretion in the hands of the prosecutor, here Angela Corey. She's the one who chose to overcharge it, or, if you like, make what sounds like a reasonable charge but has a too tough prenalty instead of charging a lesser charge with a more reasonable penalty.

    It is absolutely ridiculous to let her off the hook if you think that the man min for the crime she charged was too high. Reasonable to let the judge and jury off, but not her, since she had all the discretion. It's incomprehensible to me, and I don't understand the posturing from people.

  • John Thacker||

    Indeed, 10-20-Life was first modified, then repealed, in Florida and the NRA was one of the reasons why.

  • Jay Dubya||

    thats news to all of us here in florida

  • John Thacker||

    Good riddance to bad law, 10-20-Life is how the Miami Herald reported it back in February 25, 2016 when the repeal was signed.

  • John Thacker||

    Are you saying that people in Florida generally don't actually pay attention to what's going on with their laws? 10-20-Life was repealed this year, and aggravated assault with a firearm no longer has a mandatory minimum. The NRA supported the change, as Families Against Mandatory Minimums notes.

  • Radioactive||

    now way anyone is THAT big a retard!

  • Radioactive||

    now if we're talking douche bags, well that's a whole 'nother kettle of fish.

  • ||

    It's shreektard's passive aggressive voice.

  • ||

    The Alexander thing seems to have been the tipping point.

    Good riddance.

  • commodious, an attendant lord||

    Reason readers may recall Corey throwing the book at Marissa Alexander, who faced a possible 20-year sentence for firing a gun into the ceiling in order to scare away an abusive husband who had a protective order to stay away.

    Alexander should have served time: anyone who handles firearms in a reckless manner should be punished, and Alexander did just that. She left the house, retrieved the gun from her car, returned to the house, and shot in the vicinity of her husband and his two kids. Was she aiming at him? Well, who knows other than Alexander. But it's reckless handling in any event. The only way we preserve gun rights in this country is by punishing those who flout them.

    That said, twenty years is absurd, and fuck Corey.

  • commodious, an attendant lord||

  • UnCivilServant||

    Yeah, the "through the wall before it hit the ceiling" bit is the part that made me less than sympathetic to Alexander. That definately read as trying to kill the guy. Coupled with the remaining behaviour, I'd be inclined towards saying it was attempted murder.

  • John||

    The fact that it went through the wall before it hit the ceiling is kind of an important fact. The fact that she retrieved the gun from her car and then confronted him is also pretty important. Yet Scott describes the case as

    possible 20-year sentence for firing a gun into the ceiling in order to scare away an abusive husband who had a protective order to stay away.

    That is a completely dishonest representation of the facts of the case. Worse, it is totally unnecessary. The facts as they are, while not exonerating Alexander, still show Corey to be an unreasonable and nasty prosecutor. Yet Scott can't help himself. Why do that? It just hurts the credibility of everything he says.

    These are the sorts of things that I find most frustrating about reason and Scott and Robby in particular. They allow their cultural biases to show and cause them to lie even when there is no reason to do so and in fact doing so is counter productive to the point they are trying to make.

  • commodious, an attendant lord||

    Not to mention that Alexander had charges pending for assaulting her husband and was under a no-contact order at the time of the shooting. They're both abusive scumbags.

  • tarran||

    These are the sorts of things that I find most frustrating about reason and Scott and Robby in particular. They allow their cultural biases to show and cause them to lie even when there is no reason to do so and in fact doing so is counter productive to the point they are trying to make.

    This is pissing me off too. As is their sneering on twitter when they get called on it as if they are paying some price for challenging the assumptions of the rubes.

  • Swiss Servator||

    Oh?

    Now I am a bit steamed.

  • commodious, an attendant lord||

    I think it's strategic cozying: submit to the left's narrative with the intent of changing their mind on a mutual interest. And, frankly, it's not that big a deal. Mandatory minimums are a problem, Corey was a problem (thankfully taken care of, for the moment), and Alexander served her time. Yes, it's obnoxious to see a myth perpetuated, but illiberal realities are being perpetuated, too.

  • John||

    Then there is this;

    despite how awful a person Zimmerman clearly is

    Zimmerman is a bit of a yahoo who should have waited for the cops. But I fail to see how asking someone he didn't know in his neighborhood why there were there or even following them make him an "awful person"? It doesn't. It makes him a foolish person who got very unlucky by running into a thug but it doesn't make him an awful person. Shackford puts that in because that is the air he breaths. Yet, they think we are the rubes. Shackford is a complete rube and has no clue how the world really works and has about as much common sense as an autistic kid who managed to get out of his parents backyard unsupervised.

  • DesigNate||

    Zimmerman has been in the news for other assholish behavior. Can't remember the specifics, but it's not like the Trayvon thing is the only thing he's done that makes him look like an awful person.

  • SugarFree||

    No, Zimmerman is a cunt.

    When asked if he'd do anything differently on the night he shot Martin, he answered "No. Nothing."

    That's the answer of a cunt.

  • commodious, an attendant lord||

    Before or after the trial? Because as I understand it, the first rule of defendant's club is that you don't say anything that might imply you behaved wrongly.

  • SugarFree||

    It was his first TV interview after the trial.

    I mean, yes, he was probably still playing CYA because a civil suit was in the offing, but you can just refuse to answer.

  • John||

    What should he have done differently? I wouldn't describe what he did as smart. But the reason why it was foolish is that he risked confronting someone like Martin. The cunt in that whole affair was Martin start to finish. He was the one who felt the need to confront Zimmerman because he felt disrespected. He was the one who ended up on top of Zimmerman beating his head into the ground. And he was the one who ended up dead because it never occurred to his dumb ass that that weird little white dude he was so sure he could take might have a gun and be scared enough to use it.

    The fact that Zimmerman ended up being the bad guy in that situation rather than Martin was appalling. It should never be forgotten what a piece of shit Martin was.

  • SugarFree||

    What would have been the dire consequence if Zimmerman had not followed Martin? Martin would have gone home. Zimmerman would have gone home.

    What a horrible alternate history. Truly a world of terror and pity.

    That's why Zimmerman is a cunt.

  • Enough About Palin||

    Martin would have gone home.

    He did go home, after which, he decided to go back and confront Zimmerman. That fact is not in dispute.

  • tarran||

    What would have been the dire consequence if Zimmerman had not followed Martin? Martin would have gone home. Zimmerman would have gone hom

    I disagree with this. Zimmerman was reacting to a spate of burglaries in the neighborhood. And Martin's behavior, as Zimmerman described it, was of someone casually casing homes in passing.

    If Zimmerman was correct, and if, as has been alleged, the crime wave had started about the time Martin arrived and stopped with Martin's death, then Zmmerman was actually following the right guy; the suspicious character he was following was the actual burglar.

    Maybe he thinks he wouldnt' do anything different because he thinks every thing he did was the correct decision even though it led to a death. Maybe he's thinking as a member of the community it's his job to help the police protect his neighbors' property. Maybe he thinks that by getting out of the car to orient himself, he was assisting the police. Maybe he was attacked without warning by a Trayvon Martin doubling back on him.

    Certainly the allegations made against him by his ex's father make him out to be an unstable, angry character. Then again, my ex's allegations make me out to be the same thing, and plenty of people have shown a propensity to believe them despite their being bullshit. His most recent problems were definitely the product of someone wanting an excuse to shoot him "legally".

    But I can see how he could give that answer and not be a cunt.

  • Lord at War||

    Ask Trayvon if he would leave daddy's porch with his iced ted and Skittles to intentionally go back and confront Zimmerman again.

    "He chose... poorly"

  • ||

    That's not what makes him an awful person. Being an awful person is what makes him an awful person.

  • DesigNate||

    We give them a lot of shit, some of it deserved, some not. But taking to twitter to complain about the commenters, especially to people like Dave Weigel, is a bitch ass thing to do.

  • John||

    I am glad they are bitching. Maybe it will cause them to get smarter.

  • tarran||

    It wasn't complaining.

    It was more commiserating; as in "oh look, the ungrateful morons are predictably being churlish despite your fine reporting! They do it to me too! We are so underappreciated!"

    I don't get exercised about it, or butt hurt. I just find it childish and off-putting. If they want to hold me in contempt, they are welcome to; all I ask is that they actually report things accurately and not put their thumbs on the scale, regardless of whether it's the side that would pander to my prejudices, or that would piss me off.

  • KB Check Release||

    Sometimes I wonder why they don't hire someone who comes to libertarianism from the right wing or alt right side of things to help balance out everyone else who are clearly social progressives.

    Then I'm reminded that social signaling is everything. Or something about cocktail parties and the like.

  • Crusty Juggler||

    alt right side of things

    Please don't.

  • KB Check Release||

    Why not? It's a movement that is growing and has some good points.

    You wouldn't want reason to become a giant echo chamber would you?

    I kid it's probably too late for that.

  • Lord at War||

    See! Sparky is not a teafucking ratbagger- and he has to let you know that...

  • Radioactive||

    not even with someone else's dick!

  • Swiss Servator||

    NOT EVEN STEVE SMITH'S?

  • SugarFree||

    That said, twenty years is absurd, and fuck Corey.

    So, you agree with Scott.

  • commodious, an attendant lord||

    Of course. As I understand it, Corey tried to nail her under a statute that enforces the twenty year penalty for discharging a gun in furtherance of another felony. This was assault, perhaps at a stretch attempted murder, but it's not at all obvious what other crime she committed that would trigger that statute.

  • ||

    The crime was aggravated assault. The aggravating circumstance was discharging a firearm during the assault. How else would you charge it?

  • SugarFree||

    It was really more of an ironic comment on how you unleashed the culture warriors.

  • commodious, an attendant lord||

    Oh. I am not a perceptive man.

  • ||

    See above. Its a mandatory minimum if you're convicted of discharging a firearm in commission of a felony in FL. Once the jury found her guilty, she was up for at least 20.

  • commodious, an attendant lord||

    But isn't it an exercise in question begging? She committed assault with a deadly weapon. The deadly weapon was the means of assault, but no assault had taken place besides that which used the deadly weapon.

  • ||

    If it was a knife or a club, it wouldn't be a firearm. Why are you defending this person who broke into her former lover's house and then tried to shoot him in front of their kids?

  • SugarFree||

    After a new trial was ordered, Corey went atter Alexander on three different 20-year mandatory minimum counts, so Alexander was facing 60 years when she accepted her de facto time-served plea.

  • commodious, an attendant lord||

    He was visiting her. And as I said, she should have and did serve time. My quibble is with the mandatory minimum Corey pushed, which nearly blew up her case.

  • ||

    No. You have the facts wrong. She was in the house she used to live in that he currently occupied. Originally without his knowledge. She was there when he got home.

  • ||

    What's wrong with all you people? Don't you ever watch Lifetime? She should have been able to shoot the guy until he was dead, reload and then shoot the dead body some more, go to court, heroically and brilliantly defend herself and win and live happily ever after.

  • Ayn Random Variation||

    #1 Burning Bed

  • tarran||

    What if we don't want her to fare well, but fare badly, for example getting drunk and driving her car off the highway into the everglades, where her living but trapped body is eaten slowly alive by stinging insects?*

    Should we wave too?

    * Because that's the fate she really deserves.

  • commodious, an attendant lord||

    Metaphorically speaking, of course.

    *withers under Preet's baleful gaze*

  • commodious, an attendant lord||

    Oh, well done.

  • straffinrun||

    She got a big ole swig off the fountain of power. We can rest assured that her thirst won't ever be slaked. Esophagus ever burning and miserable existence.

  • Juvenile Bluster||

    Hooray. However:

    Mary Anne Franks, a law professor at the University of Miami: "Corey's loss is an encouraging sign that the public will no longer tolerate overzealous and unprincipled criminal prosecutions, including women and children."

    Franks is terrible, and pushes terrible "revenge porn" laws that would solve nothing and make legitimate journalism (like the Anthony Weiner pics) illegal.

  • ant1sthenes||

    I can't even tell what the fuck she is saying.

    Is she saying that women and children will no longer tolerate bad prosecutions? (is she saying children vote? that women are easily terrified into accepting authoritarianism?)

    Is she saying that the public will not tolerate bad prosecutions, even if they target women and children? (Buh?)

    Is she saying that the public will not tolerate prosecutions that are bad because, among other things, they target women and children? (who should be above the law, I guess? Look at the Hillary supporter here).

    Is she saying that the public will not tolerate bad prosecutors, even if the prosecutors are women or children? Like is there a fucking Doogie Howser, DA out there somewhere?

  • Juvenile Bluster||

    Also good: Matt Shirk, terrible public defender and best friend to Angela Corey, was blown out in his election as well

  • Radioactive||

    I heard it was a blow job, not a blow out.

  • commodious, an attendant lord||

    Michael: (into phone) Really? And all the guys like her, huh? That is, that is, that is great. Uh, you mean "away," though, right? Because otherwise it sounds a little different, but, uh, that's, uh, that's outstanding. You forgot to say "away" again. But listen, let me call you back in a bit, okay? Bye. (to Lindsay) Nellie has blown them all away.

  • Je suis Woodchipper||

    what is that from? asking for a friend.

  • commodious, an attendant lord||

    Arrested Development.

  • JimBob7||

    So shirk was turned out of office for acting like the typical Chicago Machine pol? Who'd a thunk it?

  • wef||

    If anybody cares, news just in a O Globo: Dilma is now out. 61 votes to 20.

  • Lee Genes||

    Another committed public servant prevented from fulfilling their life long dream of serving the people.

    *sheds single tear*

  • commodious, an attendant lord||

    Serving them up, more like.

  • You Sound Like a Prog (MJG)||

    Today ain't bad.

  • commodious, an attendant lord||

    Originally wanted to post that before getting sidetracked by the Alexander thing. Albuquerque's getting sued for civil forfeiture? A statist zealot gets tossed out on her ass? By H&R standards this is a very good day.

    So there's a story due about some sheriff somewhere getting off after beating a woman to a pulp in a roadside incident in 3... 2...1...

  • Jimbo||

    Why do you hate women?

  • ||

    The secret power behind this was Los Doyers. He goes to Brazil, lands, and within 24 hours, Dilma is out. Coincidence? I think not.

  • Sevo||

    I just gave her a one-fingered farewell wave; seems that was appropriate.

  • Radioactive||

    depends on where that finger went!

  • commodious, an attendant lord||

    Into the air as a symbolic gesture and nowhere near the intended recipient of said symbolic gesture!

    *frantically cringes under Preet's menacing glare*

  • Hugh Akston||

    "This goes to show, among other things, that the death penalty is on its way out."

    We can only hope.

  • commodious, an attendant lord||

    Reserved only for failing to close tags. You've been warned.

  • Hugh Akston||

    We can only hope I learn to close my tags properly

  • Lord at War||

    Yeah- because when i'm doing 3-5 for auto theft, what I want is to be lockued up with a guy doing life for murder, and has no potential of any greater punishment for killing me because solitary confinement is "cruel"...

  • ||

    Here's someone else you can wave goodbye to:

    Dilma impeached, tchau comunista

    The commies are falling like dominoes. If we could only get rid of ours.

  • EvilWayz||

    Her.

  • Griffin3||

    Bitch can chip wood. She tried to prosecute a local doctor for 3 years, on a flimsy rumor of pill pushing. Leaned on witnesses, tried to get them to say stuff that wasn't true (which they did, in a spectacularly unbelievable and contradictory manner). Gave up after three years without even an apology, after millions of dollars in wasted time and lost wages by dozens in the community.

    The kicker, in this case, the doc in question voluntarily surrendered his DEA license in the beginning, and two years later after the investigation bogged down, re-applied for it, online. It was re-instated a few hours later. But then, the next morning, Angela Corey called up the doc in a screaming rage, threatening to throw him in jail for years if he didn't surrender his license, which was granted because she was too incompetent to block it in the DEA database.

    I wouldn't piss in her mouth if her back teeth were on fire.

    *My name and address is in my title link. Florida LE has a problem with my comment, Come and Get Some.

  • Ken Shultz||

    "Sens. John McCain and Marco Rubio on the right and Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz on the left all handily won their primaries last night."

    Just because the Tea Party was so successful in purging the Republican Party of TARP supporting, drunken sailors doesn't mean Bernie people can do the same to the Democrats.

    The Tea Party was made up of a legitimate group of people who had conflicting beliefs and goals--but genuinely opposed certain things (like TARP and ObamaCare) for reals + integrity itself

    Progressives don't care about principles. In fact, their whole spiel is about using the government to force people to do what's "best" for everyone--and damn any and all principles that get in their way.

    Can anyone here think of an example of progressives restraining themselves out of deference to some principle?

    Why would Democrats in Florida stand on principle and oppose being bent over and screwed by Debbie Wasserman Schultz and the Clintons? They don't care about principles. They only care about principlals. It takes principles to oppose your own leadership.

    If John Boehner had been a Democrat (also in name, not just in philosophy) he'd still be a leader in the Democrat Party instead of a washed up, has been, backbencher.

  • Ken Shultz||

    Say whatever you want about John McCain, but also note that he even after being tortured by the North Vietnamese, he refused to be released by the Vietnamese before other POWs who had been captured before him.

    Whatever principles he's broken since, a lot of Republicans respect that--on principle. Pat Tillman was a principled guy. Can anyone here imagine someone being so principled, that they could only be a progressive? That they could only be a Democrat?

    Democrats don't do principles. They'll never clean house on principle. In their universe, principle simply doesn't provide any leverage.

  • ||

    Say whatever you want about John McCain

    Already have, nothing about any of it was positive. He's a major league douchebag.

  • Ken Shultz||

    He's a major league douche-bag--who chose to continue subjecting himself to torture on a matter of principle.

    Republicans respect that.

    Democrats consider principle stupid and embarrassing. If there are any honest liberals left, they're hiding in equivalent of some nostalgic progressive's attic.

    And that's why the Democrats cannot clear house on principle. That's why Debbie Wasserman Schultz can get nominated by the grass roots--even after she shit all over them.

    The Democrat world doesn't countenance principle.

    Why would they throw their leaders out on the basis of principle, when that entire concepts absurd and foreign to them? Principle is something Baptists teach their children in church on Sunday mornings. Who gives a shit about principle?

    I hope the point is getting across. I'm not writing this post about McCain. I'm writing about the Republican grass roots and why they reflexively support him. What McCain tells us about McCain? Not that interesting. What McCain tells us about the Republican grass roots is much more interesting.

  • Crusty Juggler||

    'Sup? Hows about you and me get involved in a little prosecutorial misconduct?

  • Fist of Etiquette||

    Her?

  • Crusty Juggler||

    Yes.

  • Crusty Juggler||

    Damnit.

  • SugarFree||

    She calls it a mayoegg.

  • Hugh Akston||

    She came in third in the Miss Inner Beauty pageant.

  • Fist of Etiquette||

    It's as Ann as the nose on plain's face.

  • Enough About Palin||

    Reason readers may recall Corey throwing the book at Marissa Alexander, who faced a possible 20-year sentence for firing a gun into the ceiling in order to scare away an abusive husband who had a protective order to stay away. Ultimately Alexander accepted a plea deal that sentenced her to three years in prison, most of which she had already served.

    Cunt, Woodchipper. Woodchipper, Cunt.

  • Uncle Jay||

    RE: Wave Farewell to Terrible Florida Prosecutor Angela Corey

    Let us all shed a tear that such a wonderful Grand Inquisitor has been forced out office. This is what happens when Grand Inquisitors are elected instead of being given a cushy lifetime appointment. Now she will have to compete with other lawyers (there's just not enough of them in this country) in order to make ends meet. But the worse part is she will never invoke terror into defendants and their attorneys. Now she will have to smile at a prospective client and think backwards. That is, she will have to surrender all her methods of persecution and try to find ways to defend her client. How sad is that? It seems just like yesterday when this Grand Inquisitor was doing such a wonderful job trying to put first time offenders for drug offenses in prison for life, prosecuting people who were defending themselves, etc. So let us all learn a lesson from this tragedy and grant our hard working, pompous and arrogant Grand Inquisitors more power to imprison us and keep us down.

  • Citizen X||

    Florida Woman Loses Job

  • ||

    Children hardest hit.

  • UnCivilServant||

    Wait, wait, Florida Woman had a job to lose?

  • lap83||

    That's what she gets for abandoning it in her car for 5 minutes

  • UnCivilServant||

    If she's related to Job and the worst she got was losing him, she got off lucky.

  • Ken Shultz||

    "Embedded within that frustration is the larger complaint that some people, particularly those in position of authority, are given a pass by peers while poor minorities are crushed by a harsh system that assumes the worst of them."

    The solution to prosecutors failing to hold police accountable and the solution to the city council making a sweetheart deal with the police union to protect the police from accountability, ultimately, the solution to those problems isn't about voters holding one or two prosecutors accountable at the ballot box.

    Ultimately, the solution is breaking the unions' hold on local elections.

    The problem isn't that we have the wrong leaders. The problem is that our leaders are beholden to the public employee unions--and that won't change until the public employee unions are decertified.

    Public employee unions need to be decertified.

  • AlmightyJB||

    I agree, but it is more than that. Prosecutors consider themselves the "top cop" so basically they are partners in crime, sometimes literally. Even if they didn't have that "punisher" mentality they rely day in and day out on cop testimony to get convictions. That does not bode well for anyone wronged by a cop who is now looking for justice. Might as well ask the cops mom to prosecute him or her.

  • CharlieMack||

    A perfect storm of opposition from all sides. Zimmerman supporters who believe it was justified self defense and that he should not have been prosecuted and Zimmerman haters who are angry he was acquitted. The Marissa prosecution with supporters who believe the innocent angel should have never been prosecuted and the opponents who believe she got off too easy for endangering children with a bullet that traveled 4 feet over their heads. A little something for everyone there.

  • The Elite Elite||

    "Sens. John McCain and Marco Rubio on the right and Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz on the left all handily won their primaries last night."

    Why, why, why do the Arizona voters keeping reelecting that sack of shit McCain? Surely there's been some primary challenger over the decades this scum has been in office that was at least slightly better than him.

  • Divemedic99||

    Marissa Alexander did not simply fire a warning shot into the ceiling. Read the whole story here:

    http://street-pharmacy.blogspo.....story.html

    Her shot was a deliberate attempt to shoot her husband.

  • MaleMatters||

    I'll add the prosecutor's name to:

    "Would the World be Better If Women Ran It?" http://malemattersusa.wordpres.....en-ran-it/

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