Biden Administration

The Big Labor President

After promising to be "the most pro-union president you've ever seen," Biden has broken with all recent Democratic predecessors by actually governing like he means it.

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Scores of millions of Americans have zero memory of living under a White House of, by, and for Big Labor. So we are going to have to make new memories to accurately assess President Joe Biden.

After repeatedly promising on the campaign trail to be "the most pro-union president you've ever seen," Biden has broken with all recent Democratic predecessors by actually governing like he means it.

On his first day in office, the 46th president fired National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) General Counsel Peter Robb, replacing him with former Communications Workers of America attorney Jennifer Abruzzo. On the same day, he rescinded some of Donald Trump's federal civil service reforms, declaring, "It is also the policy of the United States to encourage union organizing and collective bargaining."

Three days later, Biden announced the creation of a new Made in America Office inside the White House. The day after that, he signed an order saying federal agencies "shall…apply and enforce the [1931] Davis-Bacon Act and prevailing wage and benefit requirements," thus making government workers and contractors richer at the expense of taxpayers. He appointed Laborers' International Union of North America member Marty Walsh, the former mayor of Boston, as secretary of labor and created a Task Force on Worker Organizing and Empowerment, headed by Vice President Kamala Harris.

In February 2021, Biden took the step—"basically unprecedented in American history," University of Rhode Island historian Erik Loomis later told Vox—of endorsing a specific workplace unionization effort, at an Amazon warehouse in Bessemer, Alabama. (The final tally in Bessemer was 1,798 votes against unionization, 738 in favor.)

The March 2021 American Rescue Plan sloshed $1.9 trillion into mostly governmental areas, where unionization rates are high. It included an $86 billion unconditional bailout for multi-employer pension funds, a Big Labor wish-list item that had zero to do with the bill's stated purpose of COVID-19 relief.

"Biden talks like the most pro-union president since the New Deal," The Washington Post concluded in April 2021 after an in-depth comparison of presidential labor rhetoric. Yet he was just getting started.

The November 2021 Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act gushed out another $1.2 trillion in federal spending, including a "Buy American" provision mandating that building materials for the law's road, bridge, and rail projects come primarily from the United States. In addition, Biden has kept in place many of Trump's labor-pleasing protectionist restrictions on trade and immigration.

On the first anniversary of Biden's inauguration, a host of union heavies came together under the umbrella of the AFL-CIO to lob laurels in his direction. "On the campaign trail and throughout his presidency," gushed International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers President Lonnie R. Stephenson, "Joe Biden has promised to be the most pro-union, pro-worker president in history. As President Biden celebrates his first year in office, I can say with confidence his actions are matching his words."

Seafarers International Union President Michael Sacco praised Biden for supporting the 1920 Jones Act, a classic of concentrated-benefits, dispersed-costs protectionism that requires ships sailing between U.S. ports to be American-owned. American Federation of School Administrators President Ernest A. Logan pronounced Biden, who likes to brag in speeches that he "sleeps with" a teachers union member, the "Best Education President." Operative Plasterers' and Cement Masons' International Association General President Daniel E. Stepano summed up the prevailing labor assessment: "Biden has been the most pro-union, pro-worker president since Franklin Delano Roosevelt."

Is that what Americans, let alone the comparatively conservative wing of the Democratic Party that elevated Biden over his more progressive competitors in the 2020 primaries, had in mind when they voted for the old Washington hand? Probably not. Labor issues generally did not rise above the considerable din kicked up by any conversation involving Trump.

Yet it's not like Biden made any secret of his sympathies. Despite his half-century in government office, he has always maintained a regular-guy, blue-collar persona, complete with tall tales about family members from Irish coal mining stock. "My great-grandfather Blewitt…was a mining engineer, back in the days of the Molly Maguires," the president said in his 2021 Labor Day remarks, referring to a controversial 19th century mining-union group in the Northeast. "Molly Maguires…they were a little tougher. You gave them a hard time, and you ended up on the doorstep, in a bag."

There is a big gap, however, between rhetorical nostalgia for the working-man struggles of yesteryear and the largely white-collar realities of 21st century Democratic Party unionism. Just 6 percent of the private-sector work force is unionized, down from 17 percent in 1983 and 36 percent in 1953, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) annual report in February 2022. The rate for the public sector, by contrast, was 34 percent in 2021, about the same as it has been for the last several decades. "The highest unionization rates," BLS noted, "were among workers in education, training, and library occupations." Coal mining this decidedly is not.

Biden would surely like to reverse that long private-sector slide. He has been pushing for the Protecting the Right to Organize (PRO) Act, which would abolish "right to work" laws that  prohibit unions from forcing nonmembers to pay dues in 27 states. But that bill, which also would classify millions of independent contractors as employees, is already dead on arrival in the 50–50 Senate during a midterm year when Democrats are likely to see steep losses.

The awkward truth of contemporary unionism is that it's largely an effort to remove taxpayers from negotiations between white-collar union reps and the lawyer/politicians they help elect. Teachers, cops, and civil-service bureaucrats treat the tax base like a guaranteed revenue stream, which they try to maximally divert for their own self-interest at the expense of the people paying their salaries and guaranteeing their pensions. In the zero-sum game of government budgeting, blue-collar workers in the hinterlands will continue to foot the tab for paper pushers in the capital. At most, Biden will extend some of those benefits to the building trades, jacking up costs while claiming to save money.

"As president of the United States," he said in February while signing yet another pro-labor executive order, "I award contracts. [And] unless the product that I'm purchasing for the American people was made in America, and all of its component parts are made in America, we ain't buying it. We're just simply not buying it. Every single project that we're talking about that's paid for with federal dollars and is a federal project, it's going to be union jobs—every single one of them. And guess what? The American public is going to be safer, and it's going to be cheaper—cheaper paying the right wage and the right trained people to begin with and get the job done right and on time."

Such magical thinking will continue to expand in the absence of criticism. Although it may seem as antiquated as coal-mining strikes and Molly Maguires, it's time for the rest of us to again start noticing the anti-economic excesses of Big Labor.

NEXT: Brickbat: Just Eat It

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  1. With advances in AI, we should soon be able to automate bureaucracy. How hard can it be to produce an algorithm to identify key parts of the economy and write gobbledy-gook rules and regulations to fuck it all up?

    1. Sure! I can see no major reasons why this can't be made to work... To be clear, "made to to work" for our OverLards, not for us peons!

      However, we do need to add only 3 more major ingredients...

      '1) The AI needs to learn how to beat the shit out of those taxpayers who aren't paying their "fair share", and then beat some MORE taxes out of them!

      '2) The AI needs to ALSO learn how to make campaign contributions to exactly the right "top men".

      '3) The AI needs to be split into 2 camps, COSMETICALLY AT LEAST working at cross purposes, but in reality working for their own interests, each blaming the other side, and recruiting stupid human followers (of which there are plenty!) Let's call the 2 AI groups "Retards" and "Loonies", for example. The AIs can serve as their own scapegoats!

      ...And then we will be all set!

    1. FJB!

      1. Shit on Joe Biden.

        #cornplop

  2. Look, here's the only stat that matters — during Biden's first year the 10 richest Americans gained a combined $324 billion.

    And since billionaires are the base of the modern Democratic Party, it's clear Biden is doing exactly what he was put in office to do.

    #OBLsFirstLaw

    1. The Envy is strong in this little one...

      1. Why be envious at Biden's obvious failure at what he said he was going to do?

  3. Biggest since Mondale AFAICT. Does it count if they don't get elected, or only make VP? If not, then he's the biggest since I don't remember when.

    1. Clinton was big for teachers' unions, but not much for others.

      1. We need a Taxpayer's Union! Maybe just plaster that as the new label on the Libertarian Party! Government Almighty sure knows that the "D" Party will never fit this bill, and the "R" Party has become the Cult of Trump and The Stolen Elections Party, so they won't fit the bill, either!

        1. We had one: the NTU. It was very good for a good many years, then got co-opted. Now we need another.

          1. Thanks! I didn't know that! https://www.ntu.org/

            Taxes time (15 April) is near! Here is something interesting about all that...

            https://www.law.nyu.edu/sites/default/files/Mr.%20Smith%20Gets%20an%20Education_%20Why%20it%20is%20so%20Hard%20to%20get%20Easy%20Tax%20Filing%20-%20Bankman_0.pdf
            “Mr. Smith Gets an Education: Why it is so Hard to get Easy Tax Filing.”

            There may be better sources than what I have cited, but, basically, the IRS already has counted every penny in your wallet, where it came from and where it went, as well as the number of hairs on your body, and how often you fart every day! (I may be exaggerating, but not by much).

            So WHY doesn't the IRS just tell us what we owe, and be done with it? That would be OK with the IRS. But NOT with the politicians, who get bribes (ooops, I mean campaign contributions) from the likes of H&H Block and Turbo-Tax!

        2. Um... That boat done sailed. The War Between The States was fought to keep colonial States from breaking away from the Customs Union which (along with robbing Native lands) funded federal squandering. The Customs Tariff was the tax until marxian leveraged taxes on individual incomes were added, and Reconstruction saw to it that the Customs Union was The Taxpayers Union was "the" Union. Any who want to repeal taxes without violent attacking at least has the option of voting libertarian--now available in 21 countries.

      2. That's 'cause he was "Hot For Teacher!" 😉

  4. "My great-grandfather Blewitt..."

    ...by having a child who produced the line leading to me.

    1. At least he didn't bring up Corn Pop.

    2. Duncan Bassett Blewitt? of Saskatchewan? That is lineage to inspire pride and appreciation.

  5. The only organizations in the US that have missed the IT revolution are the government at all levels. Private companies and corporations have gone through multiple iterations of right-sizing, elimination of superfluous levels of management, and implementation of technologies designed to make them nimble. Fed.gov it still operating as if it's 1955.

    The only two substantive reductions of manpower and realignment of labor were both in the military. The end of the Cold War saw the draw down of forces in Europe. The use of contractors has eliminated many of the scut work jobs formally done by soldiers/sailors/airmen. Cleaning latrines, chow halls, etc.

    1. "The only organizations in the US that have missed the IT revolution are the government at all levels."

      Restaurants still need waiters and cooks, trucks still need truck drivers, and warehouses still need warehouse persons.

      Soldiers are not labor. They produce nothing and are essentially tax parasites and beneficiaries of government largess.

      1. We'll, except for the actual useful labor soldiers do.

        Along with national security - that is what soldiers produce.

        Now, you can argue how much of that product we need. You can argue with the efficiency that we produce it - both legitimate questions.

        But the military is not *just* a welfare program.

        1. "We'll, except for the actual useful labor soldiers do."

          Like caddying for the Generals on their tax payer funded golf courses? Like performing in any one of the numerous tax payer funded military bands? Such useful work can be done much cheaper with migrant workers from Mexico.

          1. We all have our grievances.

        2. We'll, except for the actual useful labor soldiers do. Along with national security - that is what soldiers produce.

          The US military has done little for national security over the last 100 years. For the most part, they have been acting as a government-subsidized mercenary army for US and European corporations.

      2. Sophist, the green collar are 85% labor. They produce more than say, a socialist such as yourself who, from what one can surmise, is not working in agriculture or manufacturing. The fact that you do not see what they produce indicates that you are firmly attached to the opinions and biases of your in-group,

        1. "Sophist, the green collar are 85% labor."

          I don't count letting your tax payer funded night goggles fall into the hands of the Taliban as labor. My group doesn't either. Neither should your group.

        2. The fact that you do not see what they produce indicates that you are firmly attached to the opinions and biases of your in-group,

          You are welcome to produce economic data supporting your view. Any time now.

      3. Once again, you show yourself to be a treasonous piece of shit. So of course a little squid faggot like you has no respect for military personnel.

    2. Keep on mind that those things done by servicemen aren't *not* done now. They are just done by civilian contract workers who get paid less - but the company that provides the contract gets paid more.

      So there isn't a net reduction in money spent - it just comes from different pots so it's easier to hide the true bill.

      1. In the long run, it's cheaper for Uncle Sam because we don't have to pay pensions or health benefits when they retire.

    3. It's really true what you say. The feds actually still use that giant iron mine (I think it's located in western Pennsylvania somewhere if memory serves correctly) with the thousands of filing cabinets that sstill store all the paperwork on federal employees. It's like something you'd see in one of those old episodes of "The X-Files".

      Ronald Reagan floated the idea around 40 years that maybe it would be a good idea to start the process of modernizing that ridiculously antiquated system. It didn't happen then, and it still hasn't happened.

  6. Remember that day the Constitution was ratified to give the federal government the authority to fund, advertise and dictate unions (collective labor)?

    Yeah me neither; F'en Nazi's...

    Why it's just another push for [WE] mob gang-land labor politics backed up with Gov-Guns... Was there some reason unionized "collective bargaining" needed the Gov-Guns???

    1. Was Reagan a Nazi for forcing the air traffic controllers back to work?
      How about Trump's Advice Memo in case 13-CC-225655, IBEW Local 134?

      1. He did not force them back to work.

        He just said that if you won't work you're fired and we'll hire some people who will.

      2. Don't forget Jane Byrne, who Dagny Taggarted Chicago's parasitical "firefighters'" goon squad. I sent her a "Who is John Galt?" postcard when the strike began, and was thrilled when she fired the lot of those government monopoly remoras.

        1. What part of "you're fired if you don't work" do you not get?

      3. Reagan fired workers who, let's be honest, chose to not work.

        Seems like a fair outcome.

  7. Scores of millions of Americans have zero memory of living under a White House of, by, and for Big Labor. So we are going to have to make new memories to accurately assess President Joe Biden.

    Except Biden is even worse than FDR because even the creator of the New Deal understood that there is no place for unions in the public sector.

    1. The first "New Nazi-Deal" UN-Constitutionally passed wasn't enough.
      This Administration wants another "New Nazi-Deal"..

      But without having to ratify the "People's Law" over them. This is how the Nazi-Regime has taken over the USA by pretending to make ?democratic? New Deals with themselves and pretending it's of the people.

    2. JFK, I am told, authorized gubmint gooniuns by EO. If true, someone ought to write a blog or article on the wrongness.

      1. Why don't you lead by example?

        Include footnotes.

  8. He's gotta pay for those 80 million votes.

  9. Biden looks like such a jerkoff in those sunglasses.

    1. It has become apparent that Jill is guilty of elder abuse. What wife would allow her husband to dress like that? Every time he gets to be in public, it is cringeworthy. Biden’s handlers must be providing “Dr Jill” something she really covets given her blanket approval to have her husband be such a tool.

    2. Old white guy douche look.

    3. he wears them to hide his senility

      1. My male goat makes that same face right before he shits.

  10. Still better than the increasing authoritarianism of the Republicans, right Reason? Now get back to slamming them daily before the midterms.

    1. "R" Trumpaloos slam themselves enough! They don't NEED any help at all!

      https://www.salon.com/2021/04/11/trumps-big-lie-and-hitlers-is-this-how-americas-slide-into-totalitarianism-begins/
      Trump’s Big Lie and Hitler’s: Is this how America’s slide into totalitarianism begins?

      The above is mostly strictly factual, with very little editorializing. When I post it, the FACTS never get refuted… I only get called names. But what do you expect from morally, ethically, spiritually, and intellectually bankrupt Trumpturds?

      Totalitarians want to turn GOP into GOD (Grand Old Dicktatorshit).

      1. The article gets some stuff right, but dishonestly acts like there is a huge difference between fascism and international socialism, Only George Orwell had the courage to mention "The Sacred Book of Adolf Hitler" circulated among British fascists claiming Hitler was Jesus Christ. Trump was the only lame duck to personally claim "we wuz robbed?" Predecessors of both Kleptocracy halves let minions and surrogates do it in, I'd bet, most elections. The claim that Tilden really won was published in the 1880 Democratic Platform, easily read online.

        1. "The Sacred Book of Adolf Hitler" circulated among British fascists claiming Hitler was Jesus Christ.

          I've never heard of that. I Googled briefly, and only found some VERY vaguely related stuff (Hitler thinking that the Brits could make good allies for NAZIs) here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zweites_Buch

          You got any more stuff, more directly related?

    2. Um yes, without a fucking doubt.

  11. 'In February 2021, Biden took the step—"basically unprecedented in American history," University of Rhode Island historian Erik Loomis later told Vox—of endorsing a specific workplace unionization effort, at an Amazon warehouse in Bessemer, Alabama. (The final tally in Bessemer was 1,798 votes against unionization, 738 in favor.)'

    Hey, that's not how democracy is supposed to work!

    1. Except that Biden’s NLRB reversed the election result and ordered a rerun election. Something about voters being intimidated by the location of the ballot box.

      1. You're telling me Biden's opposition to questioning election results is exceptionally shallow?

    2. The only legitimate democracy is workplace democracy

  12. Amazon and Starbucks workers have recently had success in forming unions. Check sources other than Reason for details.

    1. Yay! So service will decline and shit will cost more.

      1. Find an unionized book store or coffee shop if that turns your crank. Nobody is forcing you to patronize Amazon or Starbucks. I've lead a happy life without using either of them.

        1. Seriously? I absolutely love Amazon. Starbucks? Meh.

          1. "I absolutely love Amazon."

            The fact that their workers are unionizing may change your mind. Unionizing might mean higher wages and better conditions. I'm jealous already.

            1. The fact that their workers are unionizing may change your mind. Unionizing might mean higher wages and better conditions. I'm jealous already.

              Why would their working conditions have an effect on my shopping habits?

              1. They may form a union. Again, check sources other than Reason if you want more details.

                1. So what if they form a union? What do I care? Unless the union drives up prices to where it's more economical to shop somewhere else, they'll still get my business.

                  1. "So what if they form a union? What do I care?"

                    It probably means more money and better conditions for the workers without them working any harder than they are now. Doesn't that offend your sense of decency and fair play?

                    1. I understand that you think you're scoring points, but you're just being an ass by changing the conversation from shopping at Amazon to some weird caricature you've dreamed up about me.

                    2. Here's a challenge.

                      Try to respond to my 1:07 or 1:19 comments without using any form of the word "you."

                      Those comments were strictly about the subject without mentioning you at all. Can you respond without snide remarks about me as a person? If not then you'd better think about what I said, because if an attack is your only response, that means I'm probably right. Or you need to rationalize more pro price-floor arguments.

                    3. That's literally not true

              2. Do you assume Amazon will eat the added expenses?

                Mind you, I have zero issue with private unions. I would not join one, but if the workers approve them (and this should be voted about on a regular basis), fine with me. Do as you wish.

                1. Hey I'm with ya. If the union destroys Amazon by causing prices to go up to where people no longer want to buy their stuff, so be it.

              3. So why not buy some Amazon stock?

                1. What does buying stock have to do with making business with the company? You haven't been thinking soundly.

                  1. He’s senile, and an idiot.

            2. Unionizing might mean higher wages and better conditions.

              That's highly unlikely.

              1. Maybe so. A successful strike or work to rule may do the trick. Employers sometimes have to learn the hard way.

                1. But, as we saw with the big 3 automakers, they can then propose benefits that cannot remotely be covered and then expect taxpayers to pick up the bill at some point in the future.

                  1. Anyone can propose anything. Signing contracts is a two way street.

                    1. Why did employees agree to the work conditions they oppose? They could always seek another job.

                    2. Except that there is a solid chance that you and I will have to pick up those pensions on a federal level.

                      So, no, they are not a two way street.

                    3. Amazon's or Starbuck's union hasn't even signed their first contract with employers. Don't get ahead of yourself, worrying about paying their pensions.

    2. That's not entirely accurate. Does Reason block the ability to post link to other sources? https://inthesetimes.com/article/starbucks-organizing-union-labor-coffee-historic-campaign

  13. Someone actually trying to do *something* for the workers?

    Too bad the idiots won't ever clue in to that fact. They'll worship their cult leader instead who just puts a new shiny gold paint on top of the same old shit.

    1. Want to do something for workers? Eliminate minimum wage.

      And before you whine and cry about how employers will start paying people $5/hr, ask yourself how many jobs really do pay minimum wage? Not many. So why would jobs that currently pay $20/hr start paying less? They wouldn't. All that would change would be people without the skills to earn minimum wage would be able to get their foot into the door and gain experience to earn more.

      1. "Eliminate minimum wage."

        If you want lower wages, just have a word with your boss. I'm sure he will be happy to help you out.

        1. If you want more wage... Just have a word with your boss...

          And just because your request is denied only a F'en CRIMINAL would show back up packing GUNS!!!! (Gov-Guns) and threatening to kill or kidnap the boss and throw him in ur dungeon if he didn't give you the pay you wanted.

          1. There's no law, federal or otherwise, preventing you from buying your boss a minx coat or a brand new car.

            1. My boss just got me a 4% raise. I won't buy him any of those things you mentioned, but I may buy him a drink the next time I see him.

              1. Welfare workers are forbidden from accepting gifts from their charges, I believe.

              2. I doubt the clerk from the welfare office is interested in your grimy bottle of Nigh Train.

        2. Why do you think you would get a pay cut if there was no minimum wage?

          1. Isn't lower wages the whole point of eliminating the minimum wage?

            1. Minimum wage was originally created with the explicit intent of pricing undesirables out of the labor market.

              Businesses don't hire people unless what they produce is worth more than what they're getting paid. A price floor on labor means that someone who can't produce never gets hired. You know the conundrum: no job no experience, no experience no job.

              Minimum wage makes this worse because a high school kid can't voluntarily work for five bucks an hour to learn the ropes and then earn more.

              The harm caused by minimum wage isn't seen. It's unseen. It's all those unemployed people who can't even get a menial job because they have no experience.

              Allowing those people to work is the whole point of eliminating minimum wage.

              1. ^WELL SAID +1000000000000

              2. "Businesses don't hire people unless what they produce is worth more than what they're getting paid."

                Businesses have no trouble hiring un-unionized migrant workers and undercutting the minimum wage. They've been doing this for years. Amazon pays something like $5/hour for un-unionized workers tagging photos for Mechanical Turk, far below minimum wage.

                "Minimum wage makes this worse because a high school kid can't voluntarily work for five bucks an hour to learn the ropes and then earn more. "

                I'm sure they can and do. They just don't feel it necessary to tell you about it.

                1. Businesses have no trouble hiring un-unionized migrant workers and undercutting the minimum wage. They've been doing this for years. Amazon pays something like $5/hour for un-unionized workers tagging photos for Mechanical Turk, far below minimum wage.

                  Is this illegal? And how does that apply to people who aren't migrants? Like high school kids?

                  I'm sure they can and do. They just don't feel it necessary to tell you about it.

                  Meaning they're working under the table? If so then you unwittingly proved my point which is that it's illegal for anyone to get experience by working for less than minimum wage.

                  1. "Is this illegal?"

                    No. Amazon is quite open about their wage policies and have not been sanctioned. They may well be unionized, however, which could lead to an improvement in wages and working conditions for their workers, who, quite wisely, are not calling for an elimination of the minimum wage as you are.

                    1. They may well be unionized, however, which could lead to an improvement in wages and working conditions for their workers, who, quite wisely, are not calling for an elimination of the minimum wage as you are.

                      Of course they're not calling for an elimination of the minimum wage.

                      The minimum wage came about from union workers getting upset that blacks and feebs were stealing their jobs. So they got government to create a price floor for labor that protected union workers from competition.

                      Look it up.

                    2. "The minimum wage came about from union workers getting upset that blacks and feebs were stealing their jobs."

                      The blacks and feebs have already stolen their jobs. Now you want high school students to steal jobs as a way to undermine the unions?

                2. I still don't understand how examples of people getting around the minimum wage is a defense of the minimum wage. If anything you're showing the absurdity of it with examples of how workers and businesses enter into voluntary agreements to work for less.

                  Why should it be against the law for someone to work for five bucks an hour if they're willing to do it? How do you think it would effect higher wage earners? I'm honestly curious.

                  1. "I still don't understand how examples of people getting around the minimum wage is a defense of the minimum wage."

                    The Amazon workers are unionizing. They are not defending the minimum wage.

                    "Why should it be against the law for someone to work for five bucks an hour if they're willing to do it?"

                    It isn't against the law. Do your research.

                    1. It isn't against the law. Do your research.

                      So I can walk into a restaurant and say "I'll wash dishes for you for five bucks an hour" and they can legally hire me?

                      I'm obviously missing something.

                      Instead of being a snide jerk, why not be a civilized person and cure me of my ignorance?

                    2. Remember who you're talking to, sarcasmic. mtrueman spouts nonsense for fun.

              3. It also causes wage compression. When entry level people are overpaid, more valuable workers don’t get deserved raises, because the business can’t afford to pay those people more. I’ve seen examples of this firsthand. Including a friend who gave up her management position because it wasn’t worth the hassles for only $1.50 per hour wage difference.

                1. The more valuable workers are free to look for other opportunities where the employer is willing to pay a fair wage. Blaming lower paid employees for your own lack of adequate compensation is poor sportsmanship.

            2. Think about how many people actually earn minimum wage. Not many. It's a stepping stone. The bottom rung of the ladder.
              The reason it's the bottom rung is because the ladder used to be longer. Minimum wage was the equivalent of cutting off the bottom of the ladder making it out of reach to many people.
              Eliminating minimum wage simply restores the ladder to those for whom it is currently out of reach. It doesn't effect the people who have climbed it.

  14. On his first day in office, the 46th president fired National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) General Counsel Peter Robb, replacing him with former Communications Workers of America attorney Jennifer Abruzzo. killed off the Keystone Pipeline, instantly eliminating around 11,000 blue-collar union jobs.

    1. And making a few thousand well-heeled, trust-fund environmentalists very happy.

  15. It's true: This Presidency has felt like being constantly in labor for 16 straight months.

    1. Killer whales, orcinus orca, have such a gestation period, according to my sources.

    2. Morning Sickness: the result of waking up and realizing Biden is still president.

  16. $90bn of taxpayer's money was taken from the Covid bill and given to union bailouts.
    That was money meant for public health.

    $37bn of taxpayer's money was taken from the Payroll Protection Program and awarded to unions.
    That was money meant for businesses.

    Meanwhile, AFLCIO continues to try and undermine the labor market by mandating a high minimum wage union employees are exempted from.

    Fuck Joe Biden and the crooked horse he rode in on.

    1. I worked for years in an Alaska Labor Union, and it was fantastic. Bacon wages, annual training and certification, job placement... The real McCoy. It was admirable.

      Find out that was a credit to the dedicated staff at the local office and no reflection of the national standards. Came back south and saw the corruption from above rampaging unimpeded and I told them to go fish for dues.

  17. F*ck Unions.
    "of endorsing a specific workplace unionization effort, at an Amazon warehouse in Bessemer, Alabama. (The final tally in Bessemer was 1,798 votes against unionization, 738 in favor.)"
    Roll Tide!

  18. of course brandon doesn't realize that only about 4% of americans are in a union with the biggest representation coming from government employees. so much for unifying and representing all of us.

  19. Great article thanks for sharing this information

  20. It makes sense for the Big Guy to be all in on Big Labor.

  21. As a Libertarian and a proud union member, I can say this is the worst article I have ever read on Reason. Biden has been no friend to the working class. The NLRB is a friend of the boss class, the employers, to keep the working class down and fight against workers creating their own power on the shop floor. The professional business unions are little more than an electoral arm of the Democrat party. It has nothing to do with actually leading to workers owning the fruits of their labor.

    What can we do to educate Reason "reporters" on what working class struggle really looks like?

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