Coronavirus

There's Good Reason To Think the Omicron Wave Will Peak Soon

Some epidemiologists estimate that the actual number of new infections peaked last week.

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Recent COVID-19 trends suggest that the U.S. omicron wave may have peaked in several of the jurisdictions where it was first evident. That would be consistent with what happened in countries such as South Africa and the United Kingdom, which saw huge case surges that lasted less than a month, followed by steep declines. That is shorter than the cycle seen in earlier waves, possibly because omicron is so highly contagious that it quickly infects the people who are most vulnerable to it.

In New York City, where the seven-day average of daily new cases shot up in December and early January, it has leveled off during the last few days. The average for the state peaked this week after a nearly vertical rise that began in mid-December. "It's actually going downward," Gov. Kathy Hochul said on Tuesday. "If you watch the trend line, it looks like we may be cresting over that peak."

Maryland, Massachusetts, and New Jersey have seen similar drops in recent days, and so has the Northeast as a whole, according to the New York Times database. In Boston, David Leonhardt reports in the Times, "the amount of the Covid virus detected in wastewater, which has been a leading indicator of case trends in the past, has plunged by about 40 percent since its peak just after Jan. 1." He also notes that case numbers in Chicago seem to be leveling off. The Washington Post reports that "the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia has seen the rate of teachers testing positive during asymptomatic weekly screening plunge from 25 percent in the week between Christmas and New Year's to 2 percent in recent days."

Nationwide, the surge in reported cases still shows no sign of abating. But these local, statewide, and regional trends are hopeful signs that Anthony Fauci, President Joe Biden's top COVID-19 adviser, was right when he predicted on January 2 that "this thing will peak after a period of a few weeks and turn around."

That expectation was based largely on the experience in South Africa, where omicron was first identified in November. Daily new cases exploded there from late November to mid-December but have since fallen precipitously. The pattern was similar in Malawi, Mozambique, and Namibia, three other countries covered by Biden's omicron-inspired travel restrictions.

In the United Kingdom, newly identified cases have been falling since January 5 after rising dramatically in December. Cases peaked in Greece and Canada around the same time. The numbers have dipped more recently in Denmark and Switzerland.

"It's going to come down as fast as it went up," Ali Mokdad, a professor at the University of Washington's Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation (IHME), told the Associated Press yesterday. The IHME projects that newly reported cases will peak nationwide at 1.2 million by next Wednesday. But it estimates that the actual number of new infections per day, taking into account people who either are not tested or do not report their results, has already peaked, hitting about 6 million last Thursday.

Even after new infections start to drop, hospitalizations will continue to rise, since there is a lag between diagnosis and the development of serious symptoms. The seven-day average for hospitalizations in the U.S., according to the Times, was about 145,000 yesterday, 5 percent higher than the previous record set in January 2021.

Patients who test positive for COVID-19 after being admitted for other reasons have always accounted for a substantial percentage of those numbers, and their share of the total seems to be higher now than it was during prior waves. Earlier this month, the Times reported that incidental infections represented "roughly 50 to 65 percent of admissions in some New York hospitals."

Even COVID-positive patients without serious symptoms add to the stress on health care systems, since they need to be isolated. The surge will continue to cause serious problems for hospitals during the next few weeks, potentially undermining care for COVID-19 and other medical conditions. "The next few weeks are going to be brutal," University of Toronto epidemiologist Prabhat Jha told the A.P., because "there are so many people being infected that it will spill over into ICUs."

Daily deaths, another lagging indicator, also are apt to keep rising after case numbers decline. But people infected by omicron, which accounted for an estimated 95 percent of newly diagnosed COVID-19 cases as of January 1, are much less likely to experience life-threatening symptoms than people infected by the delta variant, especially if they are vaccinated or have acquired some protection as a result of prior infection. Thanks to increased immunity and omicron's relative mildness, deaths have risen much less dramatically than cases in the United States and other countries, making the current surge far less lethal than last winter's.

"The beginning of the end of the Omicron wave—if it turns out to be real—would be very good news," Leonhardt writes. "It would mean that a milder variant had become the dominant form of Covid but was no longer causing a surge in cases and overwhelming hospitals. It would mean that tens of millions of Americans had built up additional immunity, as a result of an Omicron infection. It would mean that the country would have taken a big step toward a future in which Covid is an endemic disease like the flu, rather than a pandemic that dominates life."

NEXT: Democrats Want To Mail 3 N95 Masks to Every American

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  1. Well if that's the case, then that is very good news.

    1. Fuck Joe Biden

      1. Yes, Fuck Joe Biden

        The sorry sob still has not shut down the virus. Only been waiting a year.

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      2. Fuck Joe Biden

      3. Fuck Joe Biden.

        1. That's the new mating call of the conservative. Strut around shouting "Fuck Joe Biden!" and you're guaranteed to have some Glenn Beck fan start humping your leg.

          1. Never go full Tony…

            1. Sarc only took the tip.

          2. Maybe so. But still, fuck Joe Biden. And everyone else who thinks they get to tell everyone what to do.

            1. Most of the bullshit being handed down to us is from unelected bureaucrat's. Fauci and such. I doubt it would have been than much different with a different president.

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          3. We shouldn’t be insulting you’re hero. I can see where that would trigger you democrats.

          4. Fuck sarcasmic.

            1. And fuck Joe Biden.

      4. Fuck Joe Biden

      5. Fuck Joe Biden

  2. “ It would mean that the country would have taken a big step toward a future in which Covid is an endemic disease like the flu, rather than a pandemic that dominates life."

    Why do I have the feeling the government will start treating the flu like COVID?

    1. Because you have probably seen headlines like 'Fludemic, the next big wave." in the news already.

      1. Is that like a sharknado?

        1. In fear mongering ratings I would give it five sharks in an avalanche level fear.

    2. They would if they thought they could get away with it. But deep-blue, pajama-class havens around here are pushing back against the nonsense, so I think Omicron changed the calculus even among the naturally risk averse.

      I wouldn't be surprised if they start breathlessly reporting new flu cases/deaths, but only the germophobes are going to care.

  3. wasn't the pandemic who dominated lives.

  4. The 3 free n95 masks will save us!

    When they arrive in June. I

    1. Exactly what I thought when I read that headline.

      How long to write legislation? How long to write the rules when it's passed? How long to procure the masks? How does the federal government get every individual's address? etc...

      Meanwhile, EVERY spike has been cyclic, going up then coming down. Usually 6 weeks -- ish. Everywhere. Omnicron was even faster in SA, because it's so infections it'll burn itself out.

      Everyone I know is getting it. Half my coworkers had or have a "flu" right now along with their families (We work remotely). They'll feel tired and sniffly for a few days then get back at it. Most aren't bothering to test, just assuming it's 'rona and staying home.

      If you've had OG 'rona and/or a vaccine and you go in public at all you're getting an omicron booster, whether you like it or not. It'll be done in February everywhere and numbers will be crashing.

      1. How does the federal government get every individual's address?
        That one is easy, use the voting rolls and send them out as if they were mail in ballots.

        1. What about people not registered to vote? Children? Non-citizens...

          Oh, yeah

          1. The dead? Oh, wait. They are registered. Get em a mask!

  5. It's all so fucking stupid. How long are you going to keep following virus variants like a fucking sports team?

    1. A variant that literally presents itself as the common cold and we're worried about when it will "peak" so we can finally Return To Normal(tm).

      1. I know you are joking, but this entire pandemic has caused me to rethink how we treated diseases in the past. Maybe we shouldn't have been so nonchalant when it comes to 50,000 flu deaths per year.

        1. ....Really?

          ....Really?!!?

          The whole world lost its shit, imposing draconian measures to address a disease that increased deaths by ~16%. It is not clear these measures worked of course, but assuming they had, we are talking about gut-shotting the economy to get a death rate comparable to 1970s america.

          And...you think we should be taking flu's more seriously?

          1. Nothing says radical individualism quite like seizing an opportunity to extend the writ of the public health apparat.

          2. I think we, each in our individual capacities, should each take diseases more seriously, yes.

            1. Then do it alone, Chemmy. Watch your health, eat right, exercise, get outside once in awhile and stay away from others when you are sick.
              Make your own choices and leave big brother out of the mix so we can avoid the one size fits all as if they live in the density of NYC, solutions we have been stuck with for the last two years.

            2. "I think we, each in our individual capacities, should each take diseases more seriously, yes."

              Given all the risks in life that we ought to take seriously, a disease that takes like 14 lives in 100,000 in a BAD year (usually closer to 8) is probably not something I'll fret about.

              I imagine it depends on what you mean by take seriously, but I have always tried to get vaccinated for the flu when it works with my schedule, endeavored to wash my hands and avoided going out when sick. Everything's relative, I suppose, but if you are taking the flu any more seriously than that, you are getting comparable to all those parents in the 80s fingerprinting their children out of fear that they would be kidnapped by satanists.

              I implore you you to keep the risks of nature in perspective. Especially when you are the type of person who feels others have a moral obligation to protect you from that nature, and tend to spend time scolding them for not doing so.

              1. The flu sucks. The flu sucks worse when you're old. Lots of stuff sucks worse when you're old. Or fat. Or old and fat.

                So exercise, eat right, wash your hands, and tell every statist you know to go fuck themselves.

                No real new advice there.

              2. Honestly, if you can't get people to stop talking on their phones and texting while driving, which is remarkably dangerous and antisocial, there's not a goddamned thing you can do about people (in general) spreading colds or influenza or anything else endemic.

                Basic psychology, mixed with the fact that some times it's hard to tell the difference between something real and a touch of hayfever, mean that life is not black and white. You just have to live with it, and make the best decisions for yourself.

                Interesting, that's true of so much in the world.

                1. It's also a pretty clear indication of how bad people- especially the people freaking out about COVID- have over-estimated the risks of disease.

                  Chemjeff specifically made some claim back in the day to the effect of, "employers will probably want to mandate employees get vaccinated because those employees will cost their health insurance so much more money if they get sick." When I did the math it came out to be pennies a year or something like that.

                  This is the problem with so many people- they have misjudged the risk of this virus by orders of magnitude. They think they are dealing with a huge existential risk when in fact the actual risk to themselves is less than many things they take for granted each day.

            3. There is no we. You and I are not in this together.

            4. You've had 2 and a half years to stop being a fatass piece of shit, cytotoxic. It's nobody else's responsibility to mitigate the risks to which you willfully expose yourself by being a fatass piece of shit.

          3. Yep, and here in New Orleans our mayor has reinstated the mask mandate "indefinitely". Already the VAX pass deal has no expiration date. And to think that New Orleans used to be known as a place to get wild and crazy.

        2. Maybe we shouldn't have been so nonchalant when it comes to 50,000 flu deaths per year.

          And what would you have people do differently?

          Comments like that make it hard to believe you are as against mandates as you claim.

          1. "We should act differently" is not the same as "government should force everyone to act differently".

            1. What would your propose that people do differently?

              1. Perhaps, be less reluctant to go to work if you think you are sick, thinking "oh it's probably just a cold" when it might be something like the flu that would be more dangerous to others.

                Perhaps, get in better health generally, and be more diligent about getting health checkups. I will tell you, when I do ask in casual conversation about the COVID vaccine, the overlap between the number of people who tell me they haven't gotten the COVID vaccine, and the number of people who tell me they haven't gotten ANY vaccine beyond childhood ones, is very large. I think a large part of the "vaccine hesitancy" with regards to the COVID vaccine really isn't about the vaccine itself, but just a generally blase' attitude towards vaccinations in general. Maybe people ought not be so blase' about it.

                Perhaps, just be more sensitive about other people's risks towards different diseases. I think we have become more sensitive towards other people's diet preferences, i.e., gluten-free, vegetarian, etc., and trying to accommodate different choices. That's generally a good thing and it should continue not just with diets but with overall health generally.

                Just things like that. Just be more respectful of others.

                1. Perhaps, be less reluctant to go to work if you think you are sick, thinking "oh it's probably just a cold" when it might be something like the flu that would be more dangerous to others.

                  Ever read Kitchen Confidential? That's just not an option on the service industry.

                  Perhaps, get in better health generally, and be more diligent about getting health checkups.

                  Most insurance pays for preventative medicine like that.

                  the overlap between the number of people who tell me they haven't gotten the COVID vaccine, and the number of people who tell me they haven't gotten ANY vaccine beyond childhood ones, is very large

                  I fit solidly into that group. Why should I get vaccines other than the ones I had as a condition of going to government schools?

                  I think we have become more sensitive towards other people's diet preferences, i.e., gluten-free, vegetarian, etc., and trying to accommodate different choices.

                  No. People have found a market while people like me mock those who shop at "Whole Paycheck" for being idiots.

                  Just be more respectful of others.

                  Ok. Sure. But are we talking positive or negative rights here? I think you've gone off the rails and have started to embrace positive rights, which isn't very libertarian. Tell me I'm wrong.

                  1. I have come to realize that a libertarian society cannot hope to exist if the society is filled with narcissistic misanthropic assholes.

                    If the state were shrunk down to the level of the libertarians' dreams, there would still be social problems - poverty, homelessness, hunger, etc. But now, the moral obligation to help the less fortunate would fall on individuals and their own consciences. If we truly believe that a society organized around libertarian principles will produce better outcomes than one that is not, then we have to demonstrate that with our own actions by being the examples that we wish to see.

                    Very few will tolerate a society built around "I've got mine and to hell with the rest of you".

                    1. I've seen similar arguments made by leftists who can't comprehend people cooperating without a gun at their back. I'm disappointed in you. Maybe the morons are right and you've exited stage left.

                    2. I *want* people to cooperate without a gun at their back. But that desire to cooperate willingly has to come from somewhere. It does not spring into existence ex nihilo. We have to cultivate that in ourselves. That is the only way that we can possibly hope to achieve a workable society built around libertarian principles.

                    3. "I have come to realize that a libertarian society cannot hope to exist if the society is filled with narcissistic misanthropic assholes."

                      There is no indication that any society ever will be filled with narcissistic misanthropic assholes.

                      Recognizing that I don't have a moral obligation to "help the unfortunate" is not the same as declining to "help the unfortunate". If helping the unfortunate were a moral obligation, we wouldn't lionize people who spend their lives doing exactly that. Why would you get outstanding praise for doing something you are already obligated to do?

                      Radical Individualists do not concern themselves with the perceived narcissism of others. They are interested in self improvement, not shaming others into doing things they perceive as "best". I don't know your heart and mind, but I think you really should look deep and understand what it is in you that believes society will only take care of the unfortunate if they feel "obligated" to do so.

                    4. There is no indication that any society ever will be filled with narcissistic misanthropic assholes.

                      Have you seen some of the commenters around here?

                      Recognizing that I don't have a moral obligation to "help the unfortunate" is not the same as declining to "help the unfortunate". If helping the unfortunate were a moral obligation, we wouldn't lionize people who spend their lives doing exactly that. Why would you get outstanding praise for doing something you are already obligated to do?

                      Okay, maybe I am not being clear about what I mean by 'obligation'. I am not necessarily talking about a duty that is externally assigned to you. I am talking about any duty, and specifically, a duty that you assign to yourself, based on the dictates of your own conscience. And people are lauded for performing philanthropic acts based on the dictates of their conscience because it is OPTIONAL, and because it tends to do great good for the beneficiaries. You are right in a sense, it would be nice actually to live in a world where no one got an award for philanthropy because it was just an expected thing to do.

                      And let me ask you this. I am sure there is some instance in your life when you did something charitable and selfless for someone who was deserving. Why did you do it? I am quite certain that it was not because you were forced to. It is because you believed it was the right thing to do. That is, you created an obligation for yourself, in that moment, to take those resources and devote them to a charitable cause when you could have take those same resources and used them in some other way.

                      A society that is organized around non-coercion must rely on consensual voluntary efforts to meet social problems. That is my point.

                    5. But that desire to cooperate willingly has to come from somewhere. It does not spring into existence ex nihilo.

                      I won't say it a third time: Religion.

                      Get it, spread it, believe it.

                2. I have pretty strict and specific diet preferences and it has never occurred to me that anyone else should "respect" them. My nutrition is my responsibility.

          2. I don't think it would be a bad thing if the cultural norm became people working from home when they feel a bit sick and not coming back until the day after they feel better. As opposed to only staying home when they are too sick to work.

            I also hope that most new non-resident oak buildings that get constructed are designed to support HEPA filters and better control aerosols. Given the cost of absenteeism, companies may find it well worth the slight increase in construction cost.

            Not that either really help much at directly saving lives, as deaths from flu are mostly from the young and the old. But, slightly less disease due to a modest change in cultural norms and installation of larger HVAC filter ducts seems like a pretty good deal.

            1. Resident oak -> residential

              Sorry.

            2. I don't think it would be a bad thing if the cultural norm became people working from home when they feel a bit sick and not coming back until the day after they feel better. As opposed to only staying home when they are too sick to work.

              This effectively translates out to, "I want fewer people to be self-employed, and I want more more office drones." It's fine if that's your preference, but understand that this is essentially the direction we've gone in the past ~40 years with many negative effects.

              1. Or, it could be "I want more self-employed people, but with a more robust emergency/rainy-day fund, so that they are not compelled by financial necessity to work every day even if they are sick".

                1. Spoken like someone that's never had to work for himself, or has no familiarity with a cyclical industry. Rainy day funds are for downturns.

              2. In jobs that can be done WFH, the self-employed tend to do that at home, so this idea doesn't change what they already do.

                I am not naive enough to believe that anything is going to change for folks whose jobs can only be done in-person.

        3. In which jeffy embraces his inner "if it saves only one..."

        4. Or maybe fat fucks like you should be carted off to "weight loss centers" to lose the comorbidities on an extreme diet and exercise routine.

        5. That’s because deep down, you’re an authoritarian.

          1. Deep down, I am a person who understands the difference between being a principled libertarian, and a misanthropic narcissist.

            1. And we can all see that collectivistjeff is clearly the latter, though lies about being the former.
              Leftists are literally cancer.

            2. One of us believes that you have no moral obligation to protect people from nature and one of us believes it’s a violation of the NAP to go out in public even if you’re healthy and show no signs of being infected.

              But sure, I’m the misanthropic narcissist.

            3. Deep down, you’re a slow witted fool with at best a mediocre intellect.

        6. That's fucking insane, dude.

          People at high risk always need to take care. But everyone else should be getting the occasional cold or flu or at least being exposed. That's why cold and flu viruses aren't deadly pandemics. Because most people have some immunity.
          I'm still pretty convinced that this would have been over and done (as much as it's ever going to be) some time ago if we had kept children in school and recommended that young healthy people continue their lives mostly as normal. Maybe more deaths would have happened more quickly, but I doubt there would have been more overall. And maybe some hospitals would have had a harder time for brief periods. But that seems like a pretty good trade off for 6 months to a year less of this crap.

        7. I know you are joking, but this entire pandemic has caused me to rethink how we treated diseases in the past. Maybe we shouldn't have been so nonchalant when it comes to 50,000 flu deaths per year.

          You're behind me by six months. I suggested that if we tracked regular flu cases, infections and deaths with the exact same rigor we treated COVID, we'd "discover" 300,000 regular flu deaths a year.

          1. You could be right. And if that is the case it would be really sad that we just casually overlook and treat as "normal" 300,000 people dying a year. As Iridium said, changing cultural norms with ****VOLUNTARY**** behaviors that might reduce that figure could be of benefit.

      2. I find it difficult to believe the deadliness of the pandemic when people have to go to the hospital to discover if they've got a cold or the plague.

        1. One of the reasons the hospitals are supposedly overun is because the symptoms of the virus are so similar to other winter maladies, e.g. sinus infections, colds, flu, allergies; that people are compelled to go to the hospital thinking they have the deadly version. That and firing the nurses who won't get the jab after lauding them as heroes just a few short months back.

    2. How long are you going to keep following virus variants like a fucking sports team?

      Especially after they went to the new franchise system. How am I supposed to cheer for a variant when I can't even tell which one is my hometown variant?

  6. 'It's a little bit disturbing': Unvaccinated talk radio host Glenn Beck, 57, says he has COVID for a second time and it's moved to his lungs: Reveals he's being treated with ivermectin and hydroxy

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-10399291/Unvaccinated-talk-radio-host-Glenn-Beck-says-Covid-moved-lungs.html

    Dude has put on some pounds since the last time I saw a picture of him.

    1. Wait, he's not drinking his own urine? Guess he hasn't been following the latest recommendations from Dr. Joe Rogan.

      1. Joe Rogan has hosted many 2 1/2 hour conversations with leading virologists, cardiologists and geneticists from Harvard, Oxford, Stanford and the University of Copenhagen.
        Your precious CNN, meanwhile, gets its info from the DNC and Fauci. A man who deliberately lied about his involvement with the Wuhan lab and its Covid research, deliberately lied about the vaccines provenance and was caught altering data.

        Sorry, but I think I'll go with Rogan and the experts on that one.

        1. Exactly. We live in a world where an MMA commentator, podcaster, stand up, former sitcom guy is significantly more trusted and more listened to (many time over) than the leading news networks and journalists.

          Why? Because he has people on of all view points, talks to them for hours, asks honest questions, and shows up to listen/learn rather than inject propaganda. He has had both proponents of the vaccine and anti-vaxxers on. He has long honest conversations with them.

          It is very telling that comedians overall are more listened to and trusted than professional journos and "experts". Probably no coincidence that comedians usually have a sensitive bullshit detector (and will call it out) and modern journos and "experts" are pedaling mountains of exactly that. Comedians also usually show up saying "im an idiot" and do some listening, while Fauci shows up and says "I have all the answers, listen to me, I am the science" and is wrong or lying every step of the way.

          1. It is very telling that comedians overall are more listened to and trusted than professional journos and "experts".

            Not really. Most humor is based on uncomfortable truth. Stereotypes, especially the funny ones, contain a grain of truth. Honesty is a requirement for being a comedian. Show me someone with no sense of humor and I'll show you someone who is offended by truth that they don't like. You see a lot of that in these comments.

          2. He has had both proponents of the vaccine and anti-vaxxers on. He has long honest conversations with them.

            He has?

            So, this is what I got from Joe Rogan's list of podcasts concerning guests with Dr. in the title, from 2021 to the present:

            Dr. Robert Malone
            Dr. Peter McCullough
            Dr. Sanjay Gupta
            Dr. Pierre Kory
            Dr. Shanna Swan
            Dr. Carl Hart

            Dr. Swan and Dr. Hart don't have anything to do with the vaccine, as far as I can tell.
            Dr. Gupta is of course CNN's TV Doctor, and he was mainly a foil for Joe Rogan to go off bashing CNN.
            Dr. Malone, Dr. McCullough, and Dr. Kory are of course all vaccine skeptics.

            So where are his interviews from the "pro-vaccine" side? The "leading virologists, cardiologists and geneticists" who don't bash the vaccine, don't think it is full of poison? If you think Joe Rogan is more honest than mainstream news, then where is Joe Rogan's "fair and balanced" coverage of the vaccine?

            1. Dr. Malone, Dr. McCullough, and Dr. Kory are of course all vaccine skeptics.

              That is a stunning untruth you just told there.

              1. It is? How are they not vaccine skeptics?

                1. Okay, I take that back about Dr. Kory anyway. It seems the reason he was a guest on Joe Rogan was as a proponent for ivermectin, not necessarily about the vaccine itself.

              2. And even if you disagree with my characterization of their views, those three are the only doctors that have been on his show since 2021 that are related to the vaccine. And all three of them have, at a minimum, some unorthodox views about the vaccine. Where are all the rest of the viewpoints represented on his show? I thought he has "free-wheeling discussions" with people of "all viewpoints". Where are the people going on his show to point out that the vaccine really is quite safe, presenting data? Hmm?

                Could it be, that he provides an illusion of being an "honest broker" with his choice of topics and guests that he's willing to discuss? Sure he'll have a 2-hour-long conversation with Dr. Malone, he might even ask him some hard questions, but he won't have anyone on of similar credentials who might seriously rebut Dr. Malone's claims.

                But I will be the first to admit that I am not at all an expert about his show. Maybe I'm entirely wrong and he's had plenty of doctors on his show who have made their case for the vaccine. But where are they?

                1. "But I will be the first to admit that I am not at all an expert about his show. "

                  Not only are you not an expert, but if given some evidence, like Dr Gupta, you will discard it as not counting based on the narrative you were fed about what happened on that show.

                  1. Well, you did catch me.
                    I confess, before this conversation, the only thing I had heard about Rogan's interview with Dr. Gupta was his little outburst about ivermectin and "horse pills.
                    So, I actually started listening to the Dr. Sanjay Gupta episode. It is more substantive than what I had described. That is true.

                    It also revealed something about Joe Rogan. He is not just some guy who neutrally interviews people. He injects his opinion, tries to badger them to accept it. At about the 1 hour mark, the entire conversation about myocarditis resulting from the vaccine, Joe Rogan's comparison is simply wrong. Dr. Gupta tries to point it out but Rogan just tries to browbeat him and cut him off and accuses him of bad faith when he doesn't accept Rogan's faulty comparison.

                    1. Maybe you should stop watching CNN and taking them seriously. Why don’t you democrats have higher standards?

    2. All kidding aside, I hope he gets well.

      1. No, you don’t.

        1. Yes I do. I don't derive any pleasure from anyone dying from any disease.

          1. I bet a million dollars you do.

            I remember you and White Mike crowing about Herman Cain dying "from Covid", until you learned he actually had end stage cancer.

            1. I have never "crowed" about anyone dying from any disease.

              I will graciously accept your apology now.

              1. You have. Often. And we'll equally rejoice when one of a thousand different obesity-related illnesses claims your pathetic excuse for a life. Hilariously, it will probably coronary artery disease or diabetes, not the 'rona you've spent the last 2 and a half years in a blind panic about.

                1. Hi Tulpa!

          2. What kind of partisan are you? You're supposed to dance a jig when someone on the other team dies.

            1. You literally received a pleasure that most people reserve for sex when Ashli Babbitt got blown away by a racist piece of shit cop.

  7. The beginning of the end of the Omicron wave

    14 days...

    1. 14 government days. They're like dog years, except you multiply by 6.02e23.

    2. If you're making the reference I think you're making, I'd put down good money that you would claim more victims with VHS than by COVID.

  8. Even COVID-positive patients without serious symptoms add to the stress on health care systems, since they need to be isolated.

    Why? No, seriously, why??! If everybody's got it, why single out anyone for isolation?

    1. Because there are still old, vulnerable people who haven't gotten the virus yet, and it's better to impose isolation on everyone than ask a small number of people to take extra precautions.

  9. Perhaps the real question this fucking “pandemic”, and the predictable government overreach that has resulted is:

    Are we Americans too cowardly to self govern, or too stupid?

    1. There's plenty too stupid or selfish to give a shit about a million Americans dying, that's for sure.

      We go to war over 3000 people dying on 9/11 but don't care about a million dying. Or rather I guess it's as it always was- America is too selfish and myopic to ever actually have any skin in the game. It's ok if it's other people sacrificing- the second you ask someone to do something themselves it's like all hell has broken loose.

      1. WHat pray tell, Raspberry, did you do about the 2.7 Million people who died in 2017? Were you shitting up the threads with appeals to emotion then, too? WHo the fuck am I kidding. You probably were.

      2. "...the second you ask someone to do something themselves it's like all hell has broken loose."

        Who in the fuck asked anything? Your kind mandated, shutdown, persecuted, prosecuted, and othered for two goddamn years. And still 800,000 died. I can only imagine what you people will demand next time.

      3. Fuck you. Seriously. You are an evil piece of shit.

        People object to the extreme government reaction exactly because the do care about people. It's fucking assholes like you who only care about deaths and harms from one tiny cause and think everyone else should suck it up and suffer. Go fucking eat shit. There are other things in the world that matter besides the tally of deaths with SARS-Cov2.

      4. It's almost like there's a difference between military attacks on American soil and a natural respiratory virus that has killed some small fraction of a million people who were merely infected with the virus at the time of their death. You know, like how Spanish Flu and WWII killed approximately the same number of people.

    2. Watch where you point that "we", white man. I govern myself just fine.

    3. Are we Americans too cowardly to self govern, or too stupid?

      Yes.

    1. With a large dash of nerp.

    1. Good news. What about federal contractors? I skimmed the article but didn't see anything.

      1. My understanding is that it's across the board.

    2. "As disease and death continue to mount, this Court tells the agency that it cannot respond in the most effective way possible. Without legal basis, the Court usurps a decision that rightfully belongs to others. It undercuts the capacity of the responsible federal officials, acting well within the scope of their authority, to protect American workers from grave danger,"

      I would like the see the work shown on this claim. The court has not "usurped" anyone's decision. It has merely decided that said decision is not OSHA's to make.

      Please, Kagan, Sotomayor, and Breyer, do tell me from whence OSHA gets this authority.

  10. Good if it turns out.

    I think we just need to legislate that unvaxxed get turned away once hospital capacity hits 70% then we'll be golden. Just open the floodgates and be done with the pandemic.

    1. Add fatties. Drug addicts. Gay men with AIDS.

      1. Undocumented immigrants, regardless of other health status, goes without saying, right?

        1. If they cannot produce verifiable, authentic documentation of vaccination plus boosterization then, per raspberry bidet, they should be denied hospital access once the hospital has reached 70% occupancy.

          1. Healthcare is a human right, subhumans. Be sure to vote for us come November!

            1. and be sure to budget for paying for it or plan another mortgage on your primary residence...

              It's only "fair," ya know. YOU have enough wealth to pay for whatever they say!

      2. And all democrats.

  11. In 2019, the typical occupancy rate on maintained beds where I live was ~65%. By your logic if a 100 bed community hospital has a whopping five extra cases (read: during every flu season) they are forbidden to admit unvaccinated stroke, heart attack, and trauma patients.

    That's not stupid, it's downright evil. You are a bad person for thinking that this is a good idea.

    1. That's one of shreek's socks. He literally fucks children and watches and shares child pornography. His retarded opinions about COVID are among the least evil things he believes in.

  12. We are all hoping that Omicron is the last hurrah of Covid19. There is reason for optimism, but seriously, it's not over until it's over.
    This disease should never had been political as it seems to have confounded politicians access the spectrum.

    1. I think you're confused.

    2. It's over whenever people decide to just get on with their lives and ignore the edicts. The virus isn't going to be eradicated. We just need to stop with all the testing and counting and accept that there is another flu-like illness that will come around once or twice a year in most places.

      1. Just knuckle up when Fauci sends a few hundred thou to the next overseas virology lab.

  13. The number/rate of new covid cases is almost certainly much higher than what is being reported to/by the CDC because covid tests have become very difficult if not impossible to obtain in many/most states (unless you are admitted to a hospital).

    Many people who have covid have not been able to obtain tests, and thus cannot be counted by CDC

    1. Jan 6 covid deaths: 1959
      7 day average: 1398

      Jan 12 deaths: 1256
      7 day average: 1859

      1. jan 12 deaths: 2756.

        Damn typos.

  14. We just need two weeks to flatten the curve.

    1. What s brilliant idea! Why hasn’t anyone tried that? That is sure to be the path out of this.

      1. Like Marxism, it wasn't tried correctly, so a few more bodies piled up and I'm sure we'll get it right.

        1. 5 yr. plans are hard.

  15. Been symptomatic for more than a week. First day was rough, since then, head cold stuff.
    Got a summary of a meeting from a friend: Everyone is going to get it; get over it. It will be like the seasonal flu or plain, old, rhino-virus.
    Stuff it up your ass, droolin' Joe, Newsom and Breed.

    1. When I had it I had a mild to moderate fever for about a week and had minor upper respiratory symptoms.

  16. "Even COVID-positive patients without serious symptoms add to the stress on health care systems, since they need to be isolated.... But people infected by omicron, which accounted for an estimated 95 percent of newly diagnosed COVID-19 cases as of January 1, are much less likely to experience life-threatening symptoms than people infected by the delta variant..."

    So maybe, no, they don't need to be isolated, nor even hospitalized.

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