Jobs

The Bipartisan War on Work

Urban Democrats may be leading the charge, but Republicans, too, have enlisted.

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President Joe Biden often talks about how his father used to tell him, "Joey, a job is about a lot more than a paycheck. It's about your dignity."

It's ironic, because on Biden's watch, a war on work is gathering momentum.

"Working Less Is a Matter of Life and Death" is the headline over a Sunday New York Times staff editorial. It relies on a newly published study by a World Health Organization (WHO) and International Labor Organization team that claims working more than 55 hours a week "led to" 745,000 deaths from stroke and heart disease in 2016.

Neither the editorial nor WHO specify how many deaths might be attributable to people not working enough. That is relevant information. Without it, the public health message becomes "work less," rather than "find the golden mean of moderation between working too much and working too little."

At this point, WHO has zero credibility. Syria, a brutal regime that routinely bombs hospitals and uses chemical weapons, was just elected to the WHO executive board. The WHO is to blame for what The Wall Street Journal calls the "Wuhan Whitewash," a report that downplayed the lab leak hypothesis for the origin of the COVID-19 pandemic and that instead pushed the far-fetched idea that the virus got to China via frozen food.

Yet WHO's war on work is aligned with recent U.S. public policy. Over the past 20 years, the civilian labor force participation rate has plunged to 61.7 percent from 66.9 percent. Some of that is the demographics of baby boomers retiring, but some of it reflects shifting priorities and choices.

Biden's proposed higher tax rates will punish those who work hard. Instead of subsidizing work via the earned income tax credit or incentivizing work via welfare time limits, domestic policy increasingly pays people not to work, through programs such as expanded unemployment and the expanded child tax credit.

Cambridge, Massachusetts, recently announced it would offer "$500 no-strings-attached monthly payments" to 120 households. The announcement press release said, "Cambridge joins a growing number of direct-cash pilot projects across the country, including Baltimore, MD, Paterson, NJ, Oakland, CA, Madison, WI, and 13 other cities."

Mayors for a Guaranteed Income, the group behind the experiments, has a statement of principles that says, "everyone deserves an income floor through a guaranteed income, which is a monthly, cash payment given directly to individuals. It is unconditional, with no strings attached and no work requirements."

This delinking of welfare payments and work requirements threatens to reverse one of the major bipartisan achievements of the 1990s, the welfare reform enacted by former President Bill Clinton and former House Speaker Newt Gingrich (R–Ga.).

Urban Democrats are leading the war on work, but Republicans, too, have enlisted. Former President Donald Trump's administration created the Pandemic Unemployment Assistance Program that provides payments to, among others, parents who stay home to supervise their child's remote learning. In Trump's 2020 State of the Union address, he said, "I was recently proud to sign the law providing new parents in the federal work force paid family leave, serving as a model for the rest of the country. Now I call on the Congress to pass the bipartisan Advancing Support for Working Families Act, extending family leave to mothers and fathers all across our nation."

The Wall Street Journal recently published an article by Sohrab Ahmari adapted from Ahmari's new book "The Unbroken Thread." Ahmari, a Catholic and the editor of the conservative New York Post, appreciatively quoted Rabbi Abraham Joshua Heschel's words about the Sabbath: "He who wants to enter the holiness of the day must first lay down the profanity of clattering commerce, of being yoked to toil."

I'm an admirer of the Sabbath and of Heschel, but without commerce or toil on the other six days, the Sabbath is just another vacation day, not special at all. The Bible talks about observing the Sabbath, but it also talks about working the other six days. Psalm 128 says people who eat from the work of their own hands are happy.

It's great that Biden can, by quoting his father, convey that, as the president put it May 18 in Michigan, a job is "about respect. It's about your place in the community." Republicans have been intermittently good at explaining how Democratic tax increases erode incentives to work, but they haven't quite risen to the task of explaining the war on work as an attack on basic American values like industry, upward mobility, self-reliance, human dignity, earned success, and the pursuit of happiness. Gingrich used to frame the choice as "food stamps versus paychecks," which is stark, but getting close.

Biden's father died in 2002. For America to thrive in the decades ahead, it will need more messengers, in both parties, who can articulate why a job beats "no-strings attached" cash payments, family leave, or extended unemployment. Never mind WHO and the Times editorialists: The real threat the country faces isn't overwork, it's the rising percentage of Americans who aren't working at all.

NEXT: Biden Wants To Track Cryptocurrency, but Bitcoin Seems Safe (for Now)

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  1. Vote everyone out, every time.

    1. From your lips to God’s ears, brother.

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  2. c’mon Ira … amongst the elected (R) is (D) is (R) is (D)

  3. Should we call it the WuWHO Flu?

    1. Think branding, TrumpFlu, like the tie and steaks its the best.

      1. Did Reagan give you the AIDS as well?

      2. Think lying pile of TDS-adled shit: M4e!

        1. Starting to think he really is a parody. It’s hard to be that dumb.

  4. So the one example of Republicans was a program to allow parents to stay at home because other parts of government fucked them over? Not really even close to an equivalent nature as to the democrat desires.

    Hate both programs. Don’t want to pay people to not work. But I also hate this bullshit false equivalency Reason is hell bent on pushing.

    1. Doing both sides must be in their contracts at this point.

    2. Yeah, Republican helicopter money is totes better because there are like, good reasons for it and stuff. Those bad nasty libruls just waste the money because they are evil and bad and don’t care. If only we’d elected Donald Trump again so that you could keep blaming the democrats in congress for overruling him while he gleefully signs his name to every check and give every republican pork handout a pass because at least it’s not as bad as what THEY are doing.

      Yes, right now the republicans aren’t wasting as much as the democrats right now… because they are out of power, but there isn’t a fiscally responsible bone in their bodies and the only person you are joking is yourself if you say otherwise.

  5. As a sex positive feminist, I absolutely agree that work brings dignity. I see many beautiful shiksas who have their spirits lifted and their sense of worth restored in my part time business selling high quality interracial pornography. We need to normalize sex work as something that is respectable and that low skilled women can pursue as a career without the mountains of debt that a normal college education would entail. I think the promotion of pornography and prostitution are the best ways to diversify the Libertarian party and encourage more women to join our ranks.

  6. At this point, WHO has zero credibility. Syria, a brutal regime that routinely bombs hospitals and uses chemical weapons

    I thought that story had as much credibility as the WHO.

  7. Cambridge, Massachusetts, recently announced it would offer “$500 no-strings-attached monthly payments” to 120 households. The announcement press release said, “Cambridge joins a growing number of direct-cash pilot projects across the country, including Baltimore, MD, Paterson, NJ, Oakland, CA, Madison, WI, and 13 other cities.”

    […]

    Urban Democrats are leading the war on work, but Republicans, too, have enlisted. Former President Donald Trump’s administration created the Pandemic Unemployment Assistance Program that provides payments to, among others, parents who stay home to supervise their child’s remote learning.

    I don’t wanna be that guy again, but one of these is not like the other. Both, yes, are not ideal, let alone good. But

    1. But again, one tries to recompense people who were fucked over by the government, the other just says, “here’s some of your neighbor’s money, just for being you.”

      1. Dear Teachers and Teachers Unions,

        Parents can do yours, the lunch lady’s, the janitor’s, the gym teacher’s, the guidance counselor’s, the vice principal’s, the principal’s, and even the Sunday School teacher’s jobs, 24/7 all at a fraction of the cost of a teacher’s salary. Get back to work.

        Sincerely,
        Donald J. Trump

        Reason: See! Republicans disencentivize work!

        Not giving is taking. Wet roads cause rain.

  8. My father saying was this, “The great thing about a job is you are making money and your too busy to spend it all.” I have passed this on to my children.

    I think the answer to getting people working is more difficult that just eliminating the safety nets. People choosing to sit on the sidelines are there for a reason.

    It maybe that they can make more not working. But it is also likely that they would be going back to crappy job. I did that kind of work when I was going to school, but I knew there was an end and I would get a better job. What it like for the person going back to the minimum wage job knowing there is no end in sight?

    What about the person that likes working from home. They may not want to go back to a 45 minute commute to and from work. Or to have to deal with the talkative coworkers.

    I am not sure there is an easy answer to the work question. Like many disasters this pandemic will have permanent fallout and one of those maybe in how we think about work.

    1. “…I have passed this on to my children…”

      I pity them having such a dishonest and imbecilic parent. Please do them an us a favor: Offer them up for adoption.

    2. My father saying was this, “The great thing about a job is you are making money and your too busy to spend it all.” I have passed this on to my children.

      Not spending all of the money one makes from their job can be smart, assuming that one is able to do so, if that means saving for the future. Simply being “too busy to spend it all,” on the other hand, sounds like people that are living to work, rather than working to live.

      Like many disasters this pandemic will have permanent fallout and one of those maybe in how we think about work.

      People working at the production level and low-skill service jobs have seen their incomes lag way behind white-collar professions and the executive and investment classes for decades. To at least some extent, the pandemic has really shown these people the raw deal that they have been getting. They are the ones that had to take the most risks continuing to work in person in conditions that were less safe (think the meat processing facilities with all the outbreaks), relied on public transportation that was less safe, and had the most trouble dealing with schools being closed and not being able to find care for their kids. People in jobs with pay that has managed to grow decently or well in the last ~30-40 years were the ones more able to work from home, taking care of their kids themselves, and were even able to order food and everything else to be delivered.

      Maybe some of these people are just tired of barely being able to go paycheck to paycheck just so that the rest of us can have cheap shit to buy.

    3. Almost no one works long term at a minimum wage job.

  9. “Biden’s proposed higher tax rates will punish those who work hard”
    No…..it will tax high-earners more. Equating high-income with hard workers belittles and ignores the everyday day people who work in valuable positions but don’t earn over $400,000 a year.

    1. If the position was truly valuable, the pay would be higher.

      1. Another bootlicker who equates doing a meaningful job that needs done with poverty wages.

        Way to go genius- you’re truly making the 1% proud sticking up for them.

        1. It isnt difficult to work your way out of a job that pays poverty wages. Sorry youre such a failure.

          1. It is when you’re dumb like shitbrunches.

      2. Lots of low wage positions are valuable. It’s just that there are lots of people who can do such jobs, so the price for labor is low.

    2. Youre not working hard if that is your take.

      1. I worked far harder at my lower wage jobs than my current one.

        The idea that you make more for doing more work is completely laughable when you look at the morons who are CEOs and lose billions.

        But hey, keep licking those boots.

        1. Lol. Harder doesn’t mean more work. Work is measured in output. If I figure out a way to manufacture an object quickly to up output to 100 an hour from 5 an hour, I’m doing more work. I may work less hard as I am not using my physical output, but mental output allowed my full work load to increase.

          1. Dummies don’t know that.

          2. The output of work is not measured in the number of widgets that get produced, but in the value to other people of those widgets. Produce one widget that is worth $1000 in one day vs. 1000 widgets that are worth $1 each, and that is the same economic output.

            I find a lot of debate online about the alleged statistical gap between worker productivity and worker compensation, for an interesting take on that, see here. The point seems to be that there is a lot to try and understand that goes beyond simple ideological talking points.

            1. That is only true in a free market.

              nb – that means an actual free market (in this case for labor) not merely a phrase you chant whenever you want to pretend that the status quo is exactly equivalent to the end-goal as well.

        2. CEOs work very hard. Even the ones who are failures in my experience. I’m not convinced that everything they do is useful all the time, but they work all the time.

          1. But you are right that you don’t make more for doing more work. You make more for having some valuable skill or ability and making the most of it.

    3. Here, have some of these, ☭☭☭, save yourself some keystrokes.

    4. “…Equating high-income with hard workers belittles and ignores the everyday day people who work in valuable positions but don’t earn over $400,000 a year.”

      This was posted by an imbecile who assumes to know the value of a good better than the market.

  10. Another braindead article from the losers of Reason.

    War on work? More like war on work for slave wages.

    Everyone should be working to live, not living to work. If you wanna go above and beyond, go for it and be an idiot.

    We’ve been what- like 2 or 3x more productive than the 1980s and have jack shit to show for it. We could be working 30 hour weeks and enjoying life but no, the idiots would rather have more money (and less time to spend it).

    It’s funny how the workhorses of the world (US, Japan, etc.) rate far lower in the happiness index than other places who have figured out that the key to life isn’t slaving away for some other jackoff but rather enjoying the little time we have on this earth.

    1. Feel free to start your own business, and work as much as you want, for the lifestyle you want.

      1. ^This

    2. There is nothing wrong with the FIRE movement (super savers in order to retire early), nor folks who would like for there to be more decent jobs that allow you to go part-time.

      I have a problem with the idea that people should expect farmers to grow their food, butchers to prepare their meat, utility workers to keep their lights on and water flowing, and skilled trades to build and maintain their housing without contributing anything to the economy. You want to work to live? Great! I respect and honor that choice. You want me to work so you can live? That is a problem, in my book.

    3. slave wages
      Do you know what slavery even is? There aren’t generally wages and you can’t quit. Some low wage jobs suck, for sure. But it’s an insult to people who have actually been enslaved to call it “wage slavery”.

      1. People crusading for more free shit are generally dishonest in their arguments.

    4. This guy is too uneducated to even reference the Labor Theory of Value, much less understand why it is ridiculous

  11. BIDEN: “…young black entrepreneurs are just as capable of succeeding given the chance as white entrepreneurs are, but they don’t have lawyers, they don’t have accountants…”

    1. Black people don’t make good lawyers or accountants.

      —Progressives

    2. How does SleepyJoe get a pass on stuff like this?

      IMPEACH!

      1. Tantalizing leg hairs glowing in the sunlight.

    3. To normal humans who live normal social lives, the intent behind a statement is what matters and what is received by the audience.

      Infantile gotcha games are for sociopaths who eat small animals without cooking them.

      1. What was the intent? Black people are inferior? There is no good way to parse that statement.

        1. “In 2020, the American Bar Association (ABA)’s Profile of the Legal Profession (“ABA Profile”) collected data revealing that African-American attorneys represent just five (5%) percent of all attorneys in America. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, African-Americans make up approximately thirteen (13%) percent of America’s population. Black attorney representation, at an amount of five (5%) percent, has remained unchanged for the last ten years. The North Carolina State Bar reports that of the twenty-two (22%) of African-Americans that make up its total population, only nine (9%) percent are lawyers while eighty-six percent of its lawyers identify as Caucasian/White.”

          “Overall participation of African-Americans in the accounting profession continues to be low. According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), African-Americans represent 12.1% of the employed workforce but only 8.2% of the accountant and auditor workforce.”

          If you want to read a statement a particular way, then you can parse it the way that you want to. If you look at the larger context, then you might see something different, on the other hand.

          Biden was obviously overstating things to say that they don’t have lawyers or accountants, but the data is clear that Blacks are quite underrepresented in those professions, which likely does hold back Black entrepreneurship. If they lack the numbers of people in those professions that go out of their way to help those looking to build up Black communities, then that is going to be an obstacle to that goal.

          We may want a color-blind society where there aren’t “Black” and “White” communities, but that isn’t the country we have right now. That dream didn’t get realized largely because some people thought that making discrimination illegal was enough to fix the effects of the racist past. The attitude seems to be: “We are all equal under the law now, so anyone that doesn’t make it simply wasn’t smart enough or didn’t work hard enough or both.”

          Wanting to believe in the American Dream, that we live in a meritocracy, doesn’t make it real. Talent, smarts, and hard work matter, but so do luck, the advantages or disadvantages of many circumstances that we face throughout our lives, and societal biases will obviously play a role, as well. If you believe in taking the world as it is rather than as you want it to be, then accepting these truths is necessary.

          1. Black entrepreneurs don’t require black lawyers, they just require lawyers. There are plenty of white lawyers who go out of their way to assist needy communities.

            Entrepreneurship doesn’t exist in a vacuum. It has a cultural component, and a value component – my guess would be that we’re not creating entrepreneur-positive communities in urban neighborhoods, and we’re not instilling entrepreneurial values (either at home or in the schools) at comparable rates in black communities. Certainly public school isn’t doing anything to promote the value of entrepreneurship, which is the one thing government could do.

            Want to bet most of those white entrepreneurs come from middle class white families, where the home life instilled the requisite values of independence and hard work? And there’s a deficit of working class background entrepreneurs, generally?

            This isn’t a racial story, it’s a class story. And its a story about the failure of public education.

    4. Hmm. Maybe the problem is that they need lawyers and accountants to comply with complicated regulations and taxes.
      Interestingly enough, the same applies to entrepreneurs who don’t have a lot of capital no matter what color they are.

      1. This! Exactly! I am retired, and financially comfortable. But I am not disabled and, IMHO, still have useful skills. I would love to make a few bucks solving problems for the companies and individuals in my community. But I do not want to engage with a system in which one false move sends me to jail, or costs me my retirement. I cannot make enough money to compensate me for that risk. I cannot make enough money to surround myself with fixers to enable me to simply ply my trade unmolested by the bureaucrats. And I am sure I am not the only one, black or white. So, the labor participation rate drops by one person. Then another, then another, . . .

        1. But I do not want to engage with a system in which one false move sends me to jail, or costs me my retirement.

          What work do you do where this is a realistic risk?

  12. This isn’t the place for a “both sides” argument. A temporary program in the middle of enormous job loss because government schools wouldn’t watch your kids, and regulations have made it impossible to pay someone an affordable rate to watch your kids for you is nowhere near the same magnitude as screwing up the recovering economy by extending the unemployment bonus way past the economic reopening. Another difference is that I’ll bet the Democrats were giddy with joy at the Republicans handing money to working mothers. Whereas Republicans were making noise even at the time that extending the bonus to September would screw up the recovery.

    This is a moment for Libertarians to say “Republicans are right about work, and they should also be saying…”. We can save the “both sides” arguments for stuff like marijuana, zoning/construction regulation, and occupational licensing (with a few notable exceptions on the R side).

    1. I know. HyR, probably Reason generally, does a disservice when they stretch and strain to find a “both sides” angle that isn’t legitimately there, because it dilutes and diverts from the message. What would be so awful about finding out that one major political party is much to be preferred to the other on an issue, or on a broad range of issues? The only thing seems to be that it takes away from the promotion of the libertarian movement — actually probably not the whole movement, but just its self-proclaiming leadership, or specifically Reason — as something distinct, not to be tied to anything else that’s heavily promoted in this world.

      But that’s a damaging lie, because as you point out, there are plenty of ways to distinguish libertarian ideology: a bunch of issues over which “both sides” really is an appropriate observation. But who’s going to believe that after all this wolf crying?

  13. Poor Old White Joe. He’s too old and too white do do an honest day’s work.

    1. and doing it for 48 years.

  14. Over the past 20 years, the civilian labor force participation rate has plunged to 61.7 percent from 66.9 percent. Some of that is the demographics of baby boomers retiring, but some of it reflects shifting priorities and choices.

    Since the author isn’t going to mention that the trend accelerated after the Great Recession, but then seemed to be leveling off, perhaps even climbing slowly again at around 63% before the pandemic hit, then I will. That he doesn’t mention these obvious factors into what happened to the labor participation rate in the last 20 years along with baby boomers retiring doesn’t speak well to his objectivity or the quality of his analysis. A real, quantitative analysis of what has been affecting the labor participation rate can be done, and I’m sure that there are economists that have done so. Mr. Stoll could have informed us what those analyses found rather than speculate mostly based on his own political beliefs.

  15. “basic American values like industry, upward mobility, self-reliance, human dignity, earned success, and the pursuit of happiness”

    Racist.

  16. I’ve met plenty of people, mostly younger that believe the narrative that they’ll never achieve anything through work, mostly because they’ve been taught the system is rigged against them. Most of these people seem to be those with less than 5 years in the workforce outside of college and base this on working unskilled low wage jobs followed by the tedium of office life.

    What’s interesting to me though is that the people I know without degrees but with vocational training and careers tend to be thriving and generally see more advancement in the same period of time. Most of them have already experienced a degree of economic mobility while the college graduates tend to focus on not already achieving the same successes their parents did after a careers worth of effort.

    1. Blame the focus on liberal arts, which tends to give the impression, “If I’m so smart (actually not particularly smart but just knowledgeable in a certain subject range they can share with a wink with others), why ain’t I rich?” See the attitude satirized (?) in Stevenson & Osbourne’s “The Ebb Tide”.

  17. Thos may be the dumbest BOOOOOOTTHH SSSIIIIIIIDDEEESSSS ever
    And that is saying quite a lot

  18. Somebody needs to explain what business a radical individualist philosophy has telling anyone what to do with their own time.

    The basics:

    Yes, we need people to do work, for at least a couple hundred more years. We have climate change to deal with. It will require the most work the human species has ever done.

    That is not a radically individualistic project, as you embarrassing science-skeptical children have so frequently squealed about.

    But to be clear: The work ethic being promoted here on these secular, individualistic pages comes from the goddamn Puritans. Work hard until you die, lest you see a tit and get an erection.

    That’s all the “work ethic” is about. Sometimes it’s hard to recognize that you have a culture when you’re immersed in it. You’re selling body-control by insane people who fled across the ocean to practice their bizarre penis-and-vagina-policing rituals.

    So given that we need work but don’t want to force people to live by a flawed, insane ethic invented by moronic savages, the only solution is a sort of progressive work ethic. The kind of work that is incentivized is that which enhances the welfare of the human species.

    That doesn’t mean you pay people to be mothers necessarily, but it also means you don’t starve mothers for the crime of spending time with their children.

    It also means taking away the predatory and useless sectors of the economy, of which there are many now that it’s been deregulated.

    I could explain why this is all perfectly in line with libertarianism, but fuck off, you aren’t willing to think 1/10th this hard about the shit you think you’re talking about.

    1. GFY

  19. but they haven’t quite risen to the task of explaining the war on work as an attack on basic American values like industry, upward mobility, self-reliance, human dignity, earned success, and the pursuit of happiness.

    The leadership hasn’t, but what’s new? The R party has traditionally been the Employer’s party while Dems have been the Employee party.

    No one seems much interested in being the “Entrepreneur Party.”

    With the Democrat shit against work and for welfare, the R leadership haven’t adjusted and are still arguing for the benefit of Employers – automation, h1b, and migrant labor. They haven’t quite figured out that the almighty debt issue requires increasing employees or, far better yet, building more businesses! But that would require lessening the regulations that their corporate donors demanded. Good luck with that, suckers! R party likes being a whore.

    1. Lowering regulation and marginal tax rates is all about entrepeneurs

    2. No one seems much interested in being the “Entrepreneur Party.”

      How many people are ever going to be “entrepreneurs”? The vast majority of people that work are going to spend their working lives doing a job, not starting and running their own business. Whatever ideology a political party takes, it can certainly include fostering innovation as part of it. A dynamic economy that benefits everyone requires that. That said, though, the bulk of the population will always be made of people just out there doing work that needs to get done. Any political party that wants to represent a majority of the people is going to need to keep that in mind.

      1. True. But there could be a lot more entrepreneurship if there was more of a movement to remove the taxes and regulations that create such a high barrier to starting many types of business.

      2. You might be surprised how many set up tents in their yards and braid hair for their neighbors for money if they didn’t have rules against operating out of their house or needing a license.

        Small outfits pulling in small money should be unregulated entirely. Regulations that are necessary can be scaled in as a business grows.

        A lot would do it if they could. More would do it if they needed to. Start at could. Work on need after.

      3. Maybe we have so many big employers because the rules are stacked against small businesses so hard.

        We don’t need a McDonald’s every 3 miles.

        1. Yes throw in a Wendy’s or Taco Bell every now and then.

  20. “Vote for us and we’ll give you free money. Bribery? Not at all. Just free money if you vote for us.”

  21. For America to thrive in the decades ahead, it will need more messengers, in both parties, who can articulate why a job beats “no-strings attached” cash payments, family leave, or extended unemployment.

    Cry me a river.

    IF a job beats any of those three, then there’s no need to articulate anything because people can see it.

    IF it doesn’t, then ‘articulating’ is just a fancy word for ‘lying’.

  22. 61%…. 61%….. If anyone has to wonder why their work doesn’t pay anything there it is. Just about for every hour you work you give away an hour of your labor to some other lazy-bum mooching off someone else. This is absurd especially if you throw in political non-productive employment that is counted even though it gets nothing done. I’d be less than surprised if actual ‘producers’ are clear down to 10% and shrinking. A community cannot survive on pipe-dreams – it has to have producers!

  23. It maybe that they can make more not working. But it is also likely that they would be going back to crappy job. I did that kind of work when I was going to school, but I knew there was an end and I would get a better job. What it like for the person going back to the minimum wage job knowing there is no end in sight?

    What about the person that likes working from home. They may not want to go back to a 45 minute commute to and from work. Or to have to deal with the talkative coworkers.
    ( https://wapexclusive.com )I am not sure there is an easy answer to the work question. Like many disasters this pandemic will have permanent fallout and one of those maybe in how we think about work.

    1. “the person going back to the minimum wage job knowing there is no end in sight?”

      You miss the bigger picture. Minimum wage today would buy an extremely nice house in a single year but only 50-years ago. That difference in pricing is a direct result of National Socialism (def; Nazi control of your labor/produce.) With DNC politicians running there Ponzi scheme on ‘fiat’ slave labor; it won’t be much longer and you’ll be working a full day for a can of beans.

  24. Oh we all had the same gripes about work 30 years ago.

    We just didn’t whine about it as much.

  25. You’re never going to connect the costs of these policies until America really starts failing. Then the economy won’t be able to prop up this bullshit any longer.

  26. Reading Heschels book now. I also admire his erudition and style but glad I’m not the only one to notice his snooty tone. He really comes across as an elitist egghead who never had to work a real job pleasing customers.

  27. First rule of economics – anything you subsidize, you get more of. Subsidiz unemployment and laziness, that is what you get.

  28. The sub headline is deceptive and lacking in context, a click bair swipe against republicans to draw in your publication’s more liberal readers. Saying that Donald Trump providing financial assistance to parents, who cannot work because their children were forced out of schools, amounts to a republican green light of the welfare state is classic deflection and partisan hackery on the part of the author.

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