Electric cars

Newsom Attempts To Mandate Full Transition to Electric Cars by 2035

Maybe California will figure out how to keep the lights on by then.

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California Gov. Gavin Newsom wants to end the sale of all gas-powered vehicles in California by 2035.

Apparently, Newsom is attempting to implement his own Green New Deal via executive order. He announced this plan Wednesday and released an order to phase out all in-state sales of gas-powered passenger vehicles by 2035, with a goal of 2045 for complete adoption of zero-emissions work vehicles.

Newsom's own announcement attempts to cast his order as, well, an order to the California Air Resources Board requiring it to end to all these sales (but not the ownership and use of gas vehicles) in 15 years.

But the actual text of the executive order shows that it's really just a wish list of what Newsom hopes will be feasible in 15 years. The order says it's a "goal," not a mandate, and requires that California Air Resources Board regulations be "consistent with state and federal law" to work toward this goal.

And that means Newsom isn't using this vague five-page memo to seize control over the state's entire car and fuel market. It's a bunch of calls for state agencies to create a "development strategy" for achieving these goals.

So how achievable is it? According to data from the U.S. Department of Energy, there were approximately 256,800 electric vehicles registered in California in 2018. According to InsideEVs, electric and hybrid vehicles comprise less than 14 percent of California's vehicle market share. The latest data about electric or plug-in vehicles in California shows that there have been 670,000 cars sold within the state total by the end of 2019.

California has a population of 40 million people living in 11.5 million households. While California has seen a high adoption rate of electric vehicles compared to all other states, it's still remarkably low. And keep in mind, this is with thousands of dollars of federal and state subsidies for the leasing and purchasing of electric vehicles.

As technological innovation continues, no doubt the adoption of electric vehicles will improve and the cost of owning and operating an electric vehicle will come down. But the current data shows that state leadership attempting to force adoption while threatening to prohibit fossil fuel-powered cars is a bad idea.

As it stands, California struggles each summer to keep the power grid operating. Electric cars use as much power each day as an average home. Try to imagine if California had millions of electric cars this summer while the state was implementing rolling blackouts on its hottest days. Under current adoption rates, the state projects that electric cars will consume 5.4 percent of the state's electricity by 2030. Newsom wants this to be much higher.

Amazingly, the other part of Newsom's order will actually make mass adoption of electric vehicles even harder by making energy less affordable. For instance, the order calls on lawmakers to ban fracking. California has about 650 fracking wells out of nearly 57,000 active oil and natural gas wells. The state has actually issued 50 new fracking permits this year.

Why is California issuing fracking permits as the governor calls for the entire industry to be banned? Because California still depends on fossil fuels for a significant amount of power. Even with some large wind and solar farms, its many, many natural gas-fired plants are vital to keeping the lights on.

Clearly, California needs fracking energy, and the people who work in that industry need their jobs. The state cannot currently abandon fossil fuels as an energy source and also pursue greater adoption of electric-powered vehicles. Perhaps it would work as a long-term goal if California were truly serious about using powerful non-fossil fuel sources that actually could replace the state's existing plants—like nuclear energy.

Instead, Newsom is proposing the kind of green energy program that, here in California, often serves as a transfer of tax money from the poor to the wealthy. Newsom can say in his executive order that he wants "broad accessibility for all Californians" to electric cars, but as Steven Greenhut noted in July, a study determined that California's energy policies "have been found to disproportionately benefit wealthier individuals." They're the ones who can afford the cars and the solar panels. The state's poor are those who have to live under the burden of California's disproportionately higher energy costs.

Amazingly, Newsom's grand plan is under attack by environmentalists for not being grand enough, according to the Los Angeles Times. The Climate Law Institute at the Center for Biological Diversity is mad that the state continues to approve permits for gas and oil drilling and is threatening to sue unless he halts all new permits.

There's nothing in Newsom's executive order that will actually lower the cost or energy or transportation in the Golden State. Newsom also certainly knows this, because he acknowledges and emphasizes that people will still be able to drive gas-fueled cars in California. He just wants to make it impossible to buy them here.

If California attempts to force this mandate into action, does anybody care to make any bets on car dealerships popping up in the tiny three-casino community of Primm, Nevada, just across the California border on the way from Los Angeles to Las Vegas?

NEXT: John Yoo: The Man Who Would Make the President King

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  1. The same people who have degraded the electrical grid to such a degree the state has rolling blackouts every summer, think they can all have electric cars.

    Democrats are the dumbest people on earth and maybe in all of history. I can think of no other group that is this stupid. I defy anyone to come up with a significant ruling class or political faction any time in history that believed something as stupid as what Newsome and California Democrats and by extension most Democrats in general actually believe.

      1. I quit working at shoprite and now I make $65-85 per/h. How? I’m working online! My work didn’t exactly make me happy so I decided to take a chance on something new…JHt after 4 years it was so hard to quit my day job but now I couldn’t be happier.

        Here’s what I do…>> Click here

    1. Progressives believe that magical thinking can overcome math and science and basic reality. It’s the Obama Effect: Speak of lofty ideals in beautiful words and you can make anything happen.

      1. It’s more that the “Progressives” only care that the goal has been stated and some kind of decree that “it will be done”. Once the decree is made, they stop paying attention and never really care that there’s never any follow-through (maybe because actually doing the thing pretty much always requires doing something that’s ideologically distasteful). The only part of the “Progressive” movement that’s actually about progress is the name of it; in practice they’re more dedicated to adherence to an ideological path than they are to reaching any goal that their path doesn’t currently go to, unfortunately for them (and anyone unfortunate enough to be ruled by them) that path doesn’t yet reach their alleged goals so actually getting anywhere will just have to wait.

    2. If you like walking to work, you can keep walking to work.

    3. These cars will not be powered by electricity. Duh. They will be powered by rainbows and unicorn farts.

    4. John, Democrats are generally dumb (not that I have much more respect for the Repubs), but the California variety is a breed unto their own.

      Venezuela-style electric grid? Add all the new cars to it.

      Traffic sucks? Close the roads.

      Water shortage in LA? Restrict water usage across the state.

      It rains and the water shortage goes away? See above.

      High unemployment? Put the private contractors out of business.

      A pandemic with bad effects on limited groups? Bankrupt the small and medium businesses.

    5. How about believing that Donald Trump is a modern day King Cyrus, here to do the Lord’s work despite being his own personal lack of morality or Christian behavior. That’s pretty whack.

      1. It’s easy to spot those assholes afflicted with TDS; speak of any subject and Trump becomes the subject. The wake up in the morning whining about Trump. and go to bed each night doing the same thing. It’s their LIFE!
        We can hope assholes of this sort have a fatal case and death is slow and painful in coming.
        Fuck off and die, asshole.

      2. No one believes that. They just support a President who doesn’t hate them the way the Democrats do.

        Thanks for proving my point about how stupid Democrats are. They believe stupid shit like you spew

        1. There are absolutely people who believe Trump is the modern day King Cyrus.

          1. “There are absolutely people who believe Trump is the modern day King Cyrus.”

            There are fucking TDS assholes who can’t seem to find anything else to occupy their attention, fucking TDS asshole.

            1. I quit working at shoprite and now I make $65-85 per/h. How? I’m working online! My work didn’t exactly make me happy so I decided to take a chance on something new…QAs after 4 years it was so hard to quit my day job but now I couldn’t be happier.

              Here’s what I do…>> CashApp

          2. Oh fuck off. You’re bringing up unrelated topics in order to try and redirect the conversation.

            You’re such a blatant Media Matters/DNC operative.

            1. “You’re bringing up unrelated topics in order to try and redirect the conversation.”

              So Tony then; guess that covers a multitude of TDS.

      3. Trump isn’t ruining California, they’re managing that all by themselves.

      4. John: “I can think of no other group that is this stupid.“

        I wasn’t bringing up Trump worshipers out of the blue.

        1. Asshole TDS victim: “How about believing that Donald Trump is a modern day King Cyrus,…”

          Yes, asshole TDS victim you did exactly that, asshole TDS victim.
          Fuck off and die.

          1. Notice how White Knight’s trying desperately to redirect.
            What a slimebag.

    6. No, they think THEY can have electric cars, and everyone else will be forced to ride mass transit.

    7. They’re very stupid. They need special laws because voting is too complicated for them. Apparently they also are not capable of getting ID cards.

    8. I would say Republicans and the war on drugs. Trillions spent, rights stolen, Constitution eviscerated to go from an overdose death rate of 1.7 in the 1960’s to 21.7 in 2017(source statista). Steal money from taxpayers and make thing worse.

      “Of all tyrannies, a tyranny sincerely exercised for the good of its victims may be the most oppressive. It would be better to live under robber barons than under omnipotent moral busybodies. The robber baron’s cruelty may sometimes sleep, his cupidity may at some point be satiated; but those who torment us for our own good will torment us without end for they do so with the approval of their own conscience.”

      ― C. S. Lewis

      1. Here’s another deluded Democrat. The war on some drugs is and always has been a bipartisan mess, and the Dems just picked an old drug warrior as their Presidential candidate.

    9. Of course, electric cars are a good way out, but I don’t think everyone can afford it. For example, for three years I have been saving money to buy a new car unsuccessfully and recently I bought a used Ford 150 (first I checked the history of this car at https://epicvin.com/ ) and I am happy about it

  2. By the time 2035 rolls around, CA will have dropped to a population of around 1 million or so, and have plenty of electrical power available. Unfortunately, those remaining will be the ones too poor to leave, and unable to afford an electric vehicle.

    1. It is also a complete violation of the negative commerce clause. This bullshit will never stand up in court and they know it. But sadly, they really are this stupid and really think they could do it.

      1. I think they can get away with banning the sale of electric vehicles. It’s not significantly different then setting their own emission standards on gas vehicles. It’s just not going to work.

      2. In what court? You think the fifteen member SCOTUS is going to worry about applying the Constitution when Gaia is in mortal peril?

        1. The Constitution is not a planetary suicide pact.

      3. With the chief justice we have now, my faith is not as firm as yours, John. If he could justify forcing you to buy insurance out of his ass, he can justify anything.

      4. I think he does know it and that is why it isn’t an order and has the caveat that everything be done according to federal and state law. The issue will be that the regulators will turn it into a mandate and will fuck with businesses until they can get a court date, drop the regulations, get the court to drop the case and rinse and repeat. Same as the gun control strategy.

        1. Newsom probably has his eyes on the Presidency someday.

          1. I have my eyes on him. Ideally being shot as a communist traitor.

            1. Though not by me. I favor a drumhead style trial by the feds, and a firing squad.

          2. “Newsom probably has his eyes on the Presidency someday.”

            You probably have your eyes on being a asshole TDS victim, asshole.

    2. The out-migration from CA is really only happening among taxpayers. The state’s been losing those in every single year for at least a quarter of a century.

      Transients, unregulated street vendors, and illegal immigrants (CA has something like 12-14% of the US population but 25% or more of the “undocumented” population) who live in a cash-only “under the table” economy are still flooding in, which is causing a net increase in the overall population even while the number who pay the bills is continually decreasing.

  3. I wonder what this will do to the agricultural sector in California? It is already under tons of stress from stupid irrigation rules, non science based animal right rules and non science based environmental regulations. Arizona and Florida’s produce farmers must be salivating at the prospect of more trouble for California produce farmers.

    1. Agriculture and agriculture driven economic activity is valued at around $143 billion.

    2. That was my thought as well. I don’t really see Musk’s cybertruck as being real practical for spraying ditches, hauling fence wire, and pulling pumps.

      1. Since it doesn’t actually exist and nothing is being done to develop it, it isn’t practical for anything.

    3. I thought the only thing you could grow in Arizona is cactus.

    4. “Arizona and Florida’s produce farmers must be salivating at the prospect of more trouble for California produce farmers.”

      A lot more of the country than that, it seems, rejoices in the problems Californians are facing. I foresee California gradually turning its back on the states to the east and aligning themselves increasingly to the Asian nations on the other side of the pacific, where California is still viewed with a certain wistfulness.

      1. Your ‘forseeing’ is so much bullshit.
        Put a time and a dollar amount on it, and those of us who are adults will end up laughing at you when it becomes obvious that you are full of shit.

        1. No, it’s true. Asians do tend to respect Californians for their creativity and dynamism. And they look upon California as a land of opportunity. Americans, and not just Arizona and Florida farmers, view Californians and their state with contempt.

          1. They see California as a baizuo hive.

            Africa and South America are Asia’s lands of opportunity.

            1. “They see California as a baizuo hive.”

              Sure, apologists for the Chinese government will always be ready to point accusing fingers at foreigners and their ways if only to direct attention away from the miserable failings of their own heavy handed and cynical leadership.

              The typical Chinese still take many of their cultural cues from California. They see California as home of Hollywood and Silicon Valley. San Francisco is a mountain of gold.

  4. When do people recharge their electric cars? At home at night, while they’re sleeping, so the car is ready for the day’s commute.

    When do solar panels stop generating electricity and there’s less wind for windmills to generate it, too? At night.

    Where is all this electricity to charge EVs going to come from, California? Your Green Paradise isn’t ready for them.

    1. A nuclear power plant safely tucked away in flyover country– sufficiently far from Barbra Streisand’s house.

    2. Half comes from large hydro plants, natural gas, and “nucular.” That’s what will power the cars.

  5. with a goal of 2045 for complete adoption of zero-emissions work vehicles.

    lol

  6. The only bad thing about this law is he didn’t make it 2025. It’s going to be a complete disaster, and I’d have preferred to have the disaster soon enough that even your average journalist could draw a line between cause and effect.

    1. I think in some industries it’s even sooner, I have heard 2024 for diesel school and transit buses not being allowed for sale in California. At least it’s somewhat feasible in those sectors.

  7. It’s virtue signalling and nothing more. It won’t take effect because it won’t be possible to produce that many electric cars, bar some technological breakthrough which avoids all those expensive rare earths.

    The pol will extend it, write in a zillion exemptions (“for work”, “for buying essentials like food and clothes”, “for transporting children under 26 and seniors over 50”), and do everything but actually repeal it.

    1. This is exactly the kind of virtue signalling to expect from Biden if elected. Cannot be implemented, as in physically impossible, no matter how many inflated dollars they throw at the Green New Deal and Paid Family Leave and all that other malarkey.

      1. You give too much credit to Biden, a lifelong corporate stooge. The push for electric vehicles in the US comes from companies like Google. They’ve got the confidence, the vision and the clout to make policies.

        Do you know anything about computers, Á àß äẞç ãþÇđ âÞ¢Đæ ǎB€Ðëf ảhf? Specifically the Google Chromebook? I suggest you get look at one to give you a hint at what Google has in mind for the future of cars. The Chromebook should give you an idea of the direction they are headed.

        1. “Do you know anything about computers, Á àß äẞç ãþÇđ âÞ¢Đæ ǎB€Ðëf ảhf? Specifically the Google Chromebook? I suggest you get look at one to give you a hint at what Google has in mind for the future of cars. The Chromebook should give you an idea of the direction they are headed.”

          Do you know anything about ‘falsifiable predictions’, scumbag?
          I suggest you try making one rather than posting vague bullshit claims.

          1. You’ve never heard of Chromebooks, either, have you? They must not be as common as I took them to be. I hadn’t heard of them either until a few weeks ago when someone called me to have a look at their computer which turned out to be a chromebook. It gave me an idea of the direction they want their tech to take.

            1. The government schools use them. A friend of mine went back to college and they gave him one. His middle school age daughter has one from her school as well.

              1. They give me the feeling that when Google runs our self driving electric transportation system, the closest thing we get to owning a car is owning the smartphone we use to summon a ride.

            2. “You’ve never heard of Chromebooks, either, have you?”

              Yes, in fact I have.

    2. But virtue signalling is the point. So it’ll work fine. He’s living in the governor’s mansion and sleeping on hair-product infused silk sheets. So who’s the smart one?

    3. ” It won’t take effect because it won’t be possible to produce that many electric cars”

      Electric buses are produced by the thousands every year in communist China.

      1. yeah, which is what the working class Californians will be taking to work, since they won’t be able to afford their own electric cars

        1. I wouldn’t be surprised if even the affluent didn’t own electric cars. The electric cars of the future, as envisioned by outfits like Uber and Google, will be self driving and owned by the corporation. They will also own and control the software that drives them. It makes sense seeing as how the average car today sits idle 90% of the time. Non self driving cars will naturally be phased out as the infrastructure necessary for self driving cars (specially adapted roads) won’t accommodate other vehicles.

          1. I wouldn’t be surprised if your bullshit predictions were, well, so much bullshit.

            1. “I wouldn’t be surprised…”

              It’s never been my aim to surprise you.

              1. It’s certainly well within your abilities to sling bullshit.

          2. Self-driving electric cars? Maybe in states with a sane energy policy. In CA, these will often be immobile cars, for lack of electricity to charge them.

      2. Thousands? Awesome. How about producing tens of MILLIONS of cars and trucks. I doubt the rare earth elements are available to do that.

        1. That’s trueman who posts here in the hopes of someone making a mistake, clicking on his name and thereby doubling the clicks on his blog.

          He is full of shit and worthy of being known as such:
          mtrueman|8.30.17 @ 1:42PM|#
          “Spouting nonsense is an end in itself.”

        2. ” How about producing tens of MILLIONS of cars and trucks. ”

          Don’t get your hopes up. China, the world’s largest producer and consumer has only something like a million electric vehicles yearly.

          The goal of those pushing for electric cars in America is not to match the 10 million gas driven cars produced in US yearly. Google and Uber have no intention of selling you an electric car which will sit idle for 90% of its life. They will keep the car, its software too, and make money from it 24 hours a day.

          1. Google and Uber aren’t major auto manufacturers. Ford, GM, Fiat Chrysler, Toyota, Volkswagen, Tata, Renault, and Daimler Benz are. Big ones. Plus the dozens of other smaller auto manufacturers out there. So I don’t think it makes a goddamn bit of difference what Google and Uber want to do. It isn’t up to them.

            1. Isn’t Google today’s wealthiest company in the world? They are probably as well placed to get into the self driving electric car business as anyone is. They’ve already made their intentions clear, as far as I know.

  8. Why do I have the feeling that the California government will be largely exempt from this requirement? Why do I expect that the governor will still be transported by large gas-guzzling vehicles? Is it because I’m cynical or something?

    1. But muh armored, bullet-proof, five-ton Escalade!

    2. Exactly, and the additional tax on the Lambo won’t impact the tech billionaires, so they’ll be functionally exempt as well.

  9. “Maybe California will figure out how to keep the lights on by then.”

    It’s really not productive for us Koch / Reason libertarians to criticize California. After all, the state has plenty of extremely rich people, plus one of the highest poverty rates in the country, as well as single-party Democratic rule.

    IOW California is what every state will eventually look like a few years after we implement open borders.

    #MakeAll50StatesLikeCalifornia

    1. Your hashtag is nonsense. No matter what the other 49 states do, California will always be like California, by definition.

      #TypicalDumbocrat

      1. But as Californians move to other states they become like California. That is the ultimate goal. Move and bring us those elitist values.

        #Alphabetsouptonuts
        #purplemigration

        1. It’s long past time to thin out the progressive population.

  10. In similar news, North Sentinel Islanders voted to reach the moon by 2035.

    1. You laugh but bow and arrow technology is the future.

  11. I’ve nothing against electric vehicles. They’re definitely the wave of the future. But we still have some problems to work before before governors unilaterally ban the internal combustion engine, not least of which is that they lack the authority to do so.

    First, we haven’t solved the problem of long distance travel. With a traditional car, you can stop at a gas station to fill up. With an electric vehicle you have to find a charging station and then sit around for a few hours while it charges. Good enough to charge at work or at home, but not for travel. We don’t have the infrastructure set up for it. Staying at a motel? Do they have chargers for every guest?

    Second, do we have the range for long distance travel? Most electric cars don’t. Some due, but you pay premium for the extra batteries.

    Third, electric vehicles are currently a luxury item for the affluent classes. You governors actually expect the working poor to spend most of a year’s salary on a car? And then continue to pay the high electric bills for constant charging? Face it, gas cars are significantly cheaper.

    Sure the chattering class will just posit that the government pay for the cars for the poor, because government has infinite money. But that doesn’t work in the real world.

    And of course, electric cars don’t solve the pollution and carbon problem when they’re all being charged with carbon based electricity. Wind and solar are NOT reliably, and won’t be until we get the battery technology we don’t currently possess. We need reliable carbon-free energy sources, and the only ticket for that is nuclear. Which has been forbidden. Let’s build some nuclear power stations, and then we can talk. Until then Newsome is just fapping a fantasy.

    We will get universal electric car usage, but we’re not close enough that we can be issuing mandates.

    1. Pretty much agree. I’d actually really like an all-electric vehicle, but I’m a cheap-ass and refuse to spend more than $15k (cash) on a sharply depreciating asset. And it’s not the government’s damn business what kind of car/truck I buy anyway.

    2. We will never get universal electric car use. To understand why, understand they are not electric cars. They are battery powered car. An electric car would be hooked up to a power line and run on electricity the way an electric train does. Cars don’t do that. They run on batteries. When you understand that and what batteries are actually made of, you realize there isn’t enough of the materials necessary to make batteries in the world to make battery powered cars anything but a toy of the rich and a few people.

      They are not the future. Hydrogen powered cars might be, but that won’t happen until they figure out a way to refine hydrogen in mass quantities economically and safely. And that is a long ways off.

      Battery powered cars are nothing but a tool for virtue signaling and a trojan horse to make people poor and less free.

      1. Yes. And dead batteries add a new layer of poison to the already accumulating waste. What is the Green New Deal there?
        In my opinion, wind farms and solar farms are also hideous landscape features. I question if any critical green thinking has considered how a large bank of solar panels affects the environment it is set up on and how arranging multiple structures that revolve with the wind might affect our weather patterns as they move west to east.

        1. Wind turbines kill eagles. Apparently somewhere around 5,000 annually was deemed acceptable by the Obama administration. That administration also forbid the public from seeing the actual reported numbers.

          1. Those Eagles probably voted for Trump anyway.

            But seriously that is sad

            1. Between those eagles and all the animals probably killed in wildfires….did environmentalists ever really care about anything they say they did? Or was it only ever about the communism

              1. The founder of Greenpeace left and renounced the organization because they went socialist and stopped caring about the enviroment

        2. It turns out wind turbines accumulate waste too. The bases are pretty long lived and being pretty basically metal are relatively simple (but not easy) to cut up, crush melt, recast, and/or reuse. The blades OTOH are specifically designed resin cast to custom size and shape. Their size and elasticity makes them resistant to conventional crushing. They can be cut up and then crushed but they have to be transported first and, since the resin can’t be broken down and recast, you’re cutting them up at a loss to ship them at a loss to crush them at a loss to store them at a loss until they don’t really break down.

        3. “Yes. And dead batteries add a new layer of poison to the already accumulating waste. What is the Green New Deal there?”

          Bullshit, like the rest of it.
          The green exterior is irrelevant; the red interior is what matters.

          1. They’re all pinko on the inside.

      2. Not necessarily. Look into sodium glass battery development.

        1. Look into sodium glass battery development.

          It’s still largely a pipe dream. Not even/barely prototyped, let alone mass produced and fielded.

          This is hardly the first time such promises about energy generation or power storage, even with Li-ion technology have been made falsely. Even if you accept all the hype at face value, the energy density of fossil fuels is still 20-50X greater than that of glass batteries.

          1. Ahhhhh I remember the glory days of the super capacitor dreams… Back in the late 90s early 2000s.those were the daus

            1. The energy storage of the future, and always will be.

      3. Several of the large automakers are busily working on hydrogen powered electric cars.

        1. And where is the energy to produce H to come from?

          1. Potentially on-site, but you need a lot of unused power to make it, like a nearby hydro dam to power it. There is one being built in Washington state, first one I believe.

    3. we haven’t solved the problem of long distance travel. With a traditional car, you can stop at a gas station to fill up. With an electric vehicle you have to find a charging station and then sit around for a few hours while it charges.

      Voice of experience speaking here.

      Nobody waits a few hours to charge their EV on a road trip.
      At most (and this is rare these days) you wait an hour, and you’d only do this if you had to cover a very long stretch with no fast chargers of any kind, like say deep into rural MT or ND.

      Typical charging stop is 15-20 minutes at a fast charger, and you do this about every 120-170 miles which honestly is about as far as most people will drive without wanting to stop for a piss, or meal.

      My longest regularly scheduled road trip (400 miles one way) takes a whole 15 minutes longer than it did when we made the same trip in a gasser. If I could make two charging stops instead of one it would actually take the same amount of time as the gasser as we normally make two stops on this trip.

      1. Battery tech and infrastructure has come a long way in just the past decade or so, and it will only get better. I would venture a guess that EV’s will comprise a majority of the new vehicle market in the next couple of decades… IF arbitrary mandates don’t screw it up. The watermelons need to accept that fossil fuel will always serve a vital role (rural, off-grid, and emergency reliability). Advocating for 100% renewable is foolish and, ultimately, counter-productive.

        1. Honestly I expect, absent economic calamity, that in 5 years EVs could be as much as 25% of new cars, and 50% in 10 years, without any mandates.

          1. Only if they are hydrogen

            1. BEVs have a huge jump on hydrogen gas EVs when it comes to infrastructure.

              I just can’t see the needle moving much on them in even 10 years absent some major innovations.

              Formic acid, or ammonia might start making waves in transportation though.

          2. Nope.

        2. That’s the thing. If electric cars dominate the market by then, then there was never a need for government to intervene (but the politicians will still take credit). If something happens (for example, engineers run up against a previously unknown physical limitation that makes further improvements to the technology infeasible), then government intervention will screw everyone over.

        3. “I would venture a guess that EV’s will comprise a majority of the new vehicle market in the next couple of decades.”

          Not the half of the population that lacks a driveway in which to do their charging at night.

          1. They’ll just use the smart cars that continuously roam the cities to alleviate parking and congenstion.

          2. Yeah, like I said, there’s probably always going to be a large portion of the population for which EV’s won’t be practical.

            Personally, I could get around the problem you mention for under $500 bucks and a day’s work by trenching UF-b wire out to the curb in front of my house. An outdoor rated outlet in a locked box would let me charge overnight. Probably an opportunity for power companies to make good money by leasing space in private parking lots to set up charging outlets with meters and credit card swipers.

            I really don’t know whether EV’s will be successful in the long run. I’m not rooting for or against them, but as far as I can tell there seems to be opportunity and viability in the marketplace.

      2. You have to stop every two hours to charge your car for 15 to 20 minutes? You consider that reasonable? I used to go visit my dad in another state, 6 hour trip, one tank of gas. You’re telling me an electric would have added an hour to that trip, and would have required me to stop in set locations to get the fast charger (assuming they even exist on that route, which I highly doubt).

        1. Did you drive it 6 hours straight, no stopping to piss, crap, or eat?
          Ya, I don’t do that either. I’d make 2 stops on that drive, gas or EV.

          My 400 mile drive is a 7hr trip in our gasser, and a 7hr 15m trip when we take the EV.
          Our stops are always once for a meal and bathroom break for ~45 minutes (about 15 minutes longer than it would be in the gasser), and then later once for bathroom.
          Currently there’s only one fast charger on this route. In the near future when there are two chargers on the route instead of having to sit the 15 minutes, we would leave when done eating and then charge again at the bathroom stop.

          If I wanted to do an 800 mile day, it would go much the same. The first drive would be longest at 225 to 250 miles, but after that I’d charge up only as much as it takes to get to the next stop which usually takes about 10-15 minutes, and can get you 2hrs or so down the road.

          It sounds like it would be annoying, but from my past gasser road trip history, on an 800 mile day I’d make 5 stops, usually after about 2hrs driving or so.

          Ya a single dude who can run in and piss in 3 minutes it will take a bit longer in an EV. Families though won’t notice much difference.

          1. If I bought an EV, I know there would be times I would forget to charge it just like I sometimes forget to charge my phone.

            1. Only a problem if your EV is like your phone and only can has enough juice for one day of regular use.

              That type of ev is a commuter only vehicle.
              Because of how batteries work those are actually a poor way to make a BEV car because even though most people drive less than 50 miles a day the battery will wear out faster due to excessive cycling.

          2. My 400 mile drive is a 7hr trip in our gasser

            Interstates and state highways across the US are 65-75 miles an hour and you’re averaging 57 mph.

            If I wanted to do an 800 mile day, it would go much the same. The first drive would be longest at 225 to 250 miles, but after that I’d charge up only as much as it takes to get to the next stop which usually takes about 10-15 minutes, and can get you 2hrs or so down the road.

            800 mi. day? ~4 stops? Just this summer we drove the kids to Yellowstone in just over 18 hrs.

            Ya a single dude who can run in and piss in 3 minutes it will take a bit longer in an EV. Families though won’t notice much difference.

            Horseshit. They will notice the extra stops to feed the car. You’re bullshitting your way through this one and doing it poorly.

            1. Just this summer we drove the kids to Yellowstone in just over 18 hrs.

              That is, just over 1200 mi.

            2. There really is no great way to do this particular 400 mile drive.
              Less than half is interstate and a quarter of that is urban.
              6h30 minutes driving time straight through if I didn’t stop at all. 62 mph average.
              45 min of stopping is by no means an excessive length of time for such a drive.

              I take this drive 3 or 4 times a year so I’m quite familiar with it.
              No matter what we drive its three stops when leaving home (last stop is a super quickie just outside St Louis because like hell do I want to stop for an emergency bathroom break in St Louis after 9PM), and two stops on the way back home.

              As for longer road trips, we do them in the gasser because we pull a camper. The 7 year old is not going beyond 3hrs w/o a break and the other is in diapers. I know from google’s ever present spying that on our road trips I usually do 150-180 miles between stops, and I know how long those stops take (15-20 minutes usually)

              1. DaveSs
                September.25.2020 at 12:53 am
                “There really is no great way to do this particular 400 mile drive…”

                Whine much? Yes you do.

              2. First, I said interstates *and state highways*. If you’re doing a 62 mph average around St. Louis, it’s because you’re a dumbass who can’t read road signs.

                The 7 year old is not going beyond 3hrs w/o a break and the other is in diapers. I know from google’s ever present spying that on our road trips I usually do 150-180 miles between stops, and I know how long those stops take (15-20 minutes usually)

                So what you’re saying is, if you have the bladder of a 7-yr.-old girl, electric cars aren’t that inconvenient.

          3. If your pissing that much you may want to get checked for diabeties

            1. Ain’t me, its the females in the vehicle.

          4. DaveSs
            September.24.2020 at 8:36 pm
            “Did you drive it 6 hours straight, no stopping to piss, crap, or eat?…”

            Yes.
            Fuck off, whiny asshole.

            1. I don’t understand how this is seen as a feat? I mean sure, good idea to have a drink and/or snack handy but it’s not a trip to the fucking moon.

        2. 6 hr road trip for me is a one stop affair most of the time.

          The Volt was/is still the best way to get an EV. Fits seamlessly within the current grid/gasoline infrastructure, pure electric driving for a reasonable portion of one’s commute, and the freedom of refueling at one of the 115K or so gas stations littered throughout the country.

      3. Typical charging stop is 15-20 minutes at a fast charger, and you do this about every 120-170 miles which honestly is about as far as most people will drive without wanting to stop for a piss, or meal.

        My longest regularly scheduled road trip (400 miles one way)

        “If I pad my schedule with a gas vehicle, and pretend like I’m a regular road tripper, I can verifably say that electric vehicles, if I’ve planned my route well, are only slightly worse than the same gasoline powered vehicle.”

        Wife, three kids, (and at one point two dogs) 400 miles is zero stops for gas and 1 stop at most for biologicals, and that’s with ~25% more cargo capacity and ~50% of the up front cost of a Model X. Moreover, 3-4 different vehicles from 3-4 different manufacturers fit this description.

      4. Let’s just grant for a moment your assumptions are reasonable. That’s only true now with low adoption of EVs and thus low waiting times for charging.

        Right now, waiting for a car or two at a gas pump isn’t too bad. Waiting 15 minutes *per EV in front of you*? Brutal. And because the charging time is longer than time to gas a car, expect the lines to be longer in terms of cars waiting because they’ll back up more readily. You’d need at least 3x the charging spaces as you have gas pumps today just based on relative refueling times, and then multiplied by the ratio of travel distances for a ‘full’ vehicle.

        It’ll take more than 15 years to build the infrastructure sufficient to accomodate large numbers of EVs.

        1. I don’t think large numbers of electric vehicles are a valid assumption. Ownership of passenger vehicles is not in the plans of those pushing the idea of electric vehicles most enthusiastically. There will probably be more electric mass transit vehicles as well, like trains and buses.

      5. “Typical charging stop is 15-20 minutes at a fast charger”

        a) Compared to 5 minutes to fill up with gasoline.

        b) How many charging stalls are at the station? An average station off the interstate in rural Michigan has 8-12 pumps. To handle as many cars per hour would require at least 24 charging stalls.

        c) And that’s not going to happen unless the power company builds new power lines to the station. You only get your fast charges without a long wait before even getting hooked up because there are few electric cars are on the road.

        d) And each fast charge takes some life off your battery.

    4. “Third, electric vehicles are currently a luxury item for the affluent classes. ”

      Buses are vehicles too. They are often the choice for working class travelers. No self respecting member of the affluent classes would consider travel by bus to be a luxury. There are almost 100000 electric buses sold each year around the world. But mostly in Communist China.

      1. “There are almost 100000 electric buses sold each year around the world. But mostly in Communist China.“

        And they are mostly recharged with electricity generated by coal plants that are much more polluting than any in the U.S.

        1. “And they are mostly recharged with electricity generated by coal plants”

          I’m not sure about that. It would depend on the city. China has also what is probably the world’s most ambitious hydro electric facilities across the Yangtse, it generates an enormous amount of electricity. China also has the most active nuclear generating program in the world, so there’s that as well.

          1. CA wants to breach three of their damns, and one n OR currently.

            1. Why should Californians be any better at managing their hydro electric capacity than they are at forestry?

              Maintaining dams cost money. Money that could be spent on important things like gender reveal parties.

          2. China also has the world’s most aggressive coal-power-building program. (It recently completed a 500-mile railway devoted to carrying coal.)

            1. Coal burning in China will continue to increase for the next few years. The plan is to peak CO2 emissions at around the year 2030.

    5. hyrdrogen power is the wave of the future

      1. Thought tidal power was the wave of the future. 🙂

    6. “…They’re definitely the wave of the future…”

      Assertions =/= arguments, especially when they include the ‘wave of the future’ which has been such since, oh, 1903 and gone not much further than that in the interim.

  12. Good luck with that Cali. In my entire lifetime there has been only one governor in that state who had any sense of reality and rationality. He had to good sense to abandon the democrat party and become a republican. But one party rule has led to a degenerate state and populace that will not be fixed by electric cars and wishful thinking.

  13. With any luck an earthquake will burry sf, LA, and Sacramento (yeah I used the Oxford comma bitches). The progressives have turned California into a literal flaming pile of shit. And yes I do mean literal.

    1. I was watching San Andreas and thinking how nice it would be if the post-earthquake California became two separate states, now that they were literally two separate lands. Would probably save the eastern side a lot of headaches.

      1. If they’re going to make 57 states out of the District of Columbia, the least they could do is split California into 4 states.

  14. An executive order no less! Even with Democrats controlling the legislature.

    Sacramento is a joke and Governor Newsom is an idiot.

  15. I know California has the blueprint to facilitate the exit of its sitting governor.

  16. I love how the left is making edicts from on high while also claiming Trump is a dictator.

  17. Maybe I should starting looking to build a car dealership on the CA/NV border.

  18. I predict “Partial Completely Electric” cars. Similar to “Partial Zero Emissions” cars that California already gave us. They will require that you plug them in every day in order to run, but that is just for show. They will still run on gas. They already passed a law somewhere around 20 years ago that all vehicles sold in CA would be zero emissions by 2015. They just need to enforce that one.

  19. All hail the powers and successes of Central Planning!

  20. They don’t have electricity for lights, but they want to power their cars with it?

  21. I am of the age where I no longer care what happens to the world or the country. I am over 30. I only have one question. Should I invest in nuclear power or not? 😉

  22. Clearly, California fracking needs a new governor.

  23. Forget that. I’m holding out for a Mr. Fusion.

  24. I wonder what kind of fuel they’ll use to provide electrical power to the new charging stations in every garage, millions of ’em.

    1. Simple. You will ride a stationary bike or turn a crank all night to charge your EV so you can get to work in the morning….assuming you will still have a job to go to.

  25. “If California attempts to force this mandate into action, does anybody care to make any bets on car dealerships popping up in the tiny three-casino community of Primm, Nevada, just across the California border on the way from Los Angeles to Las Vegas?”

    California won’t allow an out-of-state car to get California plates unless it has over 7500 miles on its odometer. So those dealers had better be selling used cars.

  26. Here’s what I hope becomes practical: Methane fuel cells:
    https://www.blue.world/the-fuel-cell/

    1. MasterBlaster runs Bartertown!

  27. CA working at monopolizing the electrical industry. Gosh, they already have the highest per KWH rate of the intercontinental U.S. and a growing rate of lack-of-service.

    Sounds like Obamacare; the main purpose is to gun-force higher prices and piss poor quality. What’s so ironic is the same people cheering on their own costly demise are the same people crying about non-livable wages and a UBI.

  28. Electric cars in a state with power blackouts and a semi perma cloud of smoke blocking the sun for the solar panels.

    Besides electric cars are lame, do it right and pass a law that we all have Star Trek transporters to beam us where we need to go and clear the highways at the same time.

    1. CA Mandate Revision – By 2035, anyone who doesn’t have a Star Trek transporter will be executed. 🙂

      Progressive-ism seems not to be about what kinds of possibilities the future holds but instead has everything to do with reverting/banning any progress already made.

      The “new deal” world of cave-man days.

  29. yep
    the extension cord to my on street parking from my apt place will probly be snatched by some low life.
    Oh well it costs muny to live in the beach town of losangels

    uh huh

  30. Aside from “progressive” enclaves like Berkley and Cambridge, does anyone ever replace an electric or hybrid car with another one? I seem to recall reading that most people, having done their virtue signalling revert back to the IC engine when trade-in time comes.

    Good job Gavin! Give the people the choice of any form of transport, so long as it’s what you approve.

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  32. Here is my proposal. Let’s start with a small experiment.
    Beginning in one year, the governor, his family and his staff all must use only elecrtic cars. Then try that for two years. If it works, expand to all California state employees. Then try that for another two years. Then we can discuss the rest of the population.

    I mean you can live by your own rules, right Governor?

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