7 Modules for First Amendment (Speech and Religion)

Powerpoint Slides and Videos from "An Introduction to Constitutional Law"

|The Volokh Conspiracy |

This year, professors will have to adapt their classes for distance learning. One helpful tip is to break down the doctrine into small, manageable bites. The buzzword is module, which is synonymous with unit or topic. To help professors, I have divided the corpus of constitutional law into separate modules. Each module will link to a set of Powerpoint slides, as well as previews of videos from An Introduction to Constitutional Law. The slides are free. Students can purchase our book ($23.99) to access the full video library. I encourage professors to consider recommending our supplement for this semester. Our book matches up with all of the leading casebooks. If you would like a review copy, please e-mail me: josh-at-joshblackman-dot-com.

The first post in this series focused on Constitutional Law I (Structure and Powers). The second post included sixteen modules for Constitutional Law II (Rights and Equal Protection). This post will share seven modules for an upper-level First Amendment Class (Speech and Religion).

Module 1: "Clear and Present Danger"

Module 2: When Is Conduct Speech?

 

Module 3: Does Money Equal Speech?

 

Module 4: Does the First Amendment Protect Tortious Speech? 

 

Module 5: Does the First Amendment Protect "Offensive" Speech?

 

Module 6: Generally Applicable Laws Burdening Free Exercise

 

Module 7: Governmental "Purpose" to Advance Religion

 

NEXT: Today in Supreme Court History: July 22, 1937

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  1. Anyone know if the book/video purchase price includes supplements going forward? Are the authors making new videos and adding new cases at the end of each term, especially if a recent decision overruled or significantly changed the significance of one of the cases included in the book’s 100 cases? Thanks. I’m thinking of purchasing the book/videos for our homeschooling (at under $24, it’s quite the bargain), just to increase the kids’ general knowledge (there’s no indication that any of my children wish to follow their old man into the legal profession, which makes sense as they have seen the ungodly hours I work). But it would be nice to know that we’re not limited to the original 100 cases as some of them become obsolete, even if there is a small fee to purchase videos on more recent cases.

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