Star Wars

Star Wars' Identity Crisis

And our own

|

"It is a period of civil war," begins the opening scroll of the very first film in the Star Wars series, which just goes to show that these movies have always been more than space chases and lightsaber fights. The 1977 movie that would eventually spawn a multidecade, multimedia, multibillion-dollar franchise (with at least one of those billions dedicated to Baby Yoda merchandise alone) was inspired as much by the postwar landscape of the 1970s as by the samurai films and movie Westerns to which it owes an obvious cinematic debt. Years after Star Wars debuted in theaters, creator George Lucas told the Chicago Tribune that it was "really about the Vietnam War, and that was the period where Nixon was trying to run for a [second] term, which got me to thinking historically about how do democracies get turned into dictatorships? Because the democracies aren't overthrown; they're given away."

Four decades later, not much has changed in the long-ago, far-away galaxy where Star Wars takes place—but the franchise is more relevant than ever. In 2020, Star Wars isn't just political; it's a microcosm of the fractious, tribal, exhausted landscape of American politics—and not only because of our 21st century predilection for making every major motion picture a battleground for the culture wars. The most recent trilogy of films, billed as the third and likely final act of the saga's mainstage space opera, is as confused about its message as a Democratic primary candidate; as ambivalent about technology as a millennial in a love-hate relationship with her iPhone; as steeped in nostalgia as an old-timer wearing a "Make America Great Again" hat and muttering that the factories will reopen any day now. It's a funhouse-mirror reflection of a democracy having an identity crisis…which, incidentally, is what the franchise itself is doing, too. More than anything else, it's the lack of a coherent narrative that makes Star Wars such a potent meta-commentary on the politics of the last five years.

The Force Awakens marked the dawn of the Trump era: Released on the eve of the 2016 election, it captured a brief moment of liberal optimism—a time when the future of both Star Wars and the presidency seemed destined to be female. Then came The Last Jedi, made in those shell-shocked months following Trump's election and inauguration. Our heroes reckoned with the consequences of putting their faith in the wrong leadership, and the movie leaned heavily on the kind of progressive rhetoric emphasized by Democrats who thought that 2018 would usher in a wave of radically progressive politicians (rhetoric that fell as flat with voters as The Last Jedi did with most fans). Finally, there was Rise of Skywalker. Premiering almost exactly a year before our next presidential election, the film read like a flailing Hail Mary attempt to get things back on track, reuniting the (fan) base with a familiar narrative, canon characters, and apologies for the excesses of the film that preceded it.

Star Wars lost its narrative footing just as pop culture was increasingly becoming the lens through which our political conflicts take place. The personal is the political, fandom is religion, and the release of every Star Wars film is accompanied by a spate of breathless Twitter-sourced news stories about problematic fans boycotting the movie or bullying minority cast members off social media. As a result, the new trilogy is seen as a proxy for America in the age of Trump. Luke Skywalker, the anointed leadership of a new generation of Jedi, now lives in self-imposed exile on a distant planet after failing to live up to expectations. (Hillary Clinton, without a spaceship on hand, had to settle for the Chappaqua woods.) Ben Solo, the son of Han and Leia, was pushed into the arms of the evil First Order by the mentor who feared his dreams of the dark side—and became the pop-culture patron saint of disaffected young men who, seeing themselves as unfairly demonized by the progressive left, veer to the right in search of belonging. There's even a ripped-from-the-headlines plot twist in Rise of Skywalker in which the First Order's Admiral Hux is revealed to be a secret rebel mole, for no other reason than that he's lost confidence in the temperamental Kylo Ren; the only thing missing is an anonymous op-ed assuring the galactic public that the First Order administration still has adults in the room. (Perhaps ominously, things do not end well for Hux.)

But it's not just about liberal vs. conservative, left vs. right, or the light vs. dark sides of the Force. Both the fictional Star Wars galaxy and our present political landscape are trapped between the competing lures of burn-it-all-down progressivism and wallow-in-the-past nostalgia. And while the former had its disastrous trial run during The Last Jedi, the latter isn't necessarily working either, as evidenced by the franchise's uneasy relationship with advances in technology.

Take the action scenes, which have always been inspired by real-world combat: samurai sword battles, tank warfare, high-flying dogfights at close range. Behold the thrilling spectacle of the rebels navigating their X-wings through the twisty, turny trenches of the Death Star before a well-timed torpedo incinerates its core—or, 40 years later, the gut-punching Last Jedi opening sequence, in which the Resistance "bombs" the First Order as it closes in on a planet housing the rebel base, losing countless lives and resources in the process.

But where combat tech hasn't evolved much in the world of Star Wars, our own has been revolutionized by targeted missiles and unmanned drones. This makes kicking off The Last Jedi with what's essentially a suicide mission—all to destroy one lousy dreadnought—seem that much more incongruous. Back in 1977, remotely detonating your enemies from thousands of miles away was a movie villain's game. In the 21st century, it's how Nobel Peace Prize winner Barack Obama preferred to wage war. An American military operation no longer takes the form of a few plucky pilots standing up to a massive, organized, military-industrial machine; we are the machine, the uniformed leadership with our finger on a button, obliterating our enemies from space (where no one can hear them scream).

Even as it ignores modern drone warfare, Star Wars has swung dramatically in the opposite direction when it comes to anxieties over the internet. In the real world, bots sow chaos on social platforms, A.I. sex dolls create consent controversies, and Jordan Peterson's YouTube channel just might be a rabbit hole to alt-right radicalization. In a key Rise of Skywalker plotline, C3PO deprives the Resistance of valuable information because of a flaw in his programming: The droid cannot translate an inscription written in Sith, a quirk that feels like a warning about the dangers of suppressing speech. Trying to silence their enemies leaves our heroes dangerously ignorant of the key to defeating them. Worse, the only way to retrieve the essential information is a hack that also wipes C3PO's memory—and the decades' worth of information, and relationships with his human comrades, that memory contains.

The whole thing is distasteful, and it highlights the inconsistencies in how droids are treated: At the same time they're cooly weighing the need to scramble C3PO's brain, the rebels are coddling an abused droid named D-0 who rebuffs them when they get too close, rolling back with a panicked "No, thank you!" (Insert your best R2-#MeToo pun here.)

That's an exception that proves the rule: In the Star Wars universe, droids may be servants, companions, soldiers, or co-pilots; the one thing they aren't is autonomous. When they try to exert control over their own lives, bad things happen. In the spin-off film Solo: A Star Wars Story, we learn that Lando Calrissian once had an unrequited love affair with a temperamental droid named L3-37. L3 is a tireless advocate for droid emancipation, and she gets catastrophically injured after inciting a droid revolt; the only way to save her is to upload her consciousness to the Millennium Falcon, where she's subsumed into the ship's navigation system. Though nobody says so, it's an ethically fraught moment: L3 survives, sort of, but at the cost of her personhood. It's not hard to imagine the rambunctious droid balking at her new future as a vehicle, her jilted lover and his pals literally riding around inside her head. And all this droid-rights rhetoric is happening at a moment when real-life science is finally getting advanced enough to raise complicated questions about our relationships with A.I. and related technologies.

Your Alexa may not be colluding with Siri and Google to overthrow the government or kill you in your sleep, but she's listening in on your conversations, collecting your data, and violating your privacy—and your trust. But whose fault is that? In a world where we allow algorithms to guide what we watch, where we travel, even who we date, we have to ask ourselves which kind of intelligence is truly in control. What would have happened if C3PO, rather than welcoming his amnesiac future with a resigned farewell, screamed and wept and begged his friends not to erase his mind?

As though the franchise weren't confused enough in its reckoning with the ways technology has changed us, there's also the fact that the actual politics of the Star Wars universe somehow haven't changed at all. Four decades after the first films, our heroes are still fighting the exact same ideological battles as before, a conceit so bizarre that it bypasses nostalgia and veers into self-delusion.

At the start of The Force Awakens, the opening scroll informs us that Princess Leia and her band of resistance fighters are once again on a quest to liberate the oppressed, re-establish the Republic, and "restore peace and justice" to the galaxy—in other words, a quest to spread democracy on a massive scale. But as three decades of real-life American foreign policy have taught us, democracy can't be foisted on an unwilling public, and Star Wars doesn't make a particularly convincing case that the galaxy even wants what the Resistance is selling. Thirty years after the Battle of Endor, the Republic established by Leia has already fallen into ruin; in The Last Jedi, a wrecked Resistance sends out a frantic distress call and is met with silence. The people have lost hope, someone says—but what if it's worse? What if they're simply sick of it all?

By the time we get to Rise of Skywalker, the idea that anyone appreciates what the rebels are doing becomes a literal punchline, as Rey uses a Jedi mind trick to brainwash the First Order's stormtroopers into welcoming her aboard. "It's OK we're here," she says. "You're relieved that we're here."

"Thank goodness you're here," the stormtrooper agrees.

It's funny because it's bullshit.

By the time we reach the climax of Rise of Skywalker, the lines between good and evil, oppressed and oppressor, light side and dark side are hopelessly blurred. Remember, the Resistance is ostensibly mobilizing to regain control of a Republic that rightfully belongs to them, having won the war for the galaxy a good 30 years ago. Yet they still call themselves rebels, and they still operate less as an organized government and more as a slapdash militia with questionable leadership, which spends most of its time being dominated by the better-funded, better-organized, technologically superior First Order. Even their big, final battle is won only at the last minute by the lucky arrival of a populist army of private citizens, all of whom just happen to have ships with advanced battle tech on board. (Nobody mentions it, but the Resistance would've been a lost cause from the get-go if the new Republic had decided to get serious about gun control.) And the enemies they're here to fight? After you've spent three films peeking under the armor of the First Order's storm-troopers, learning their backstories, and even meeting some who defected, escaped, and have lived peaceful lives ever since, it's a lot less clear in these final moments that the Resistance victory is a cause for celebration.

Knowing that the First Order's army is made up of kidnapped child soldiers who were ripped from their families and trained to kill, are we really meant to enjoy the spectacle of them running, screaming, helplessly trapped in their ship and dying en masse as it crashes and burns? And are the galactic masses, including the recently defeated, really going to welcome their new overlords under the current circumstances? One can't help noticing that this war wasn't even about the competing armies at all. The battle that mattered was an intimate, secret stand-off between Rey, Palpatine, and Ben Solo—in other words, just another power struggle between members of the galaxy's ruling elite. If the people can't be arsed to join the fight, maybe it's because it's all the same to them: No matter who ends up in charge, it's Force-sensitive family dynasties all the way down. Palpatines, Skywalkers. Sith lords, Jedi knights.

Culture critics often compare the interplanetary government of Star Wars to the United Nations, but the fractious galaxy with its unregulated movement and free trade among various worlds feels much more like a single nation of cooperating states: ours. And on the eve of the 2020 election, Star Wars feels like a cautionary tale about the dangers of putting your faith in leaders who turn out to be sore winners, of scorching the earth you have to live on when the war is over, of win-at-all-costs tribalism when you still need the losers' acceptance in order to govern effectively. A long time ago, in a galaxy far, far away, people were divided, fearful, frustrated, exhausted, and justifiably pessimistic about things ever being otherwise.

May the Force be with us.

NEXT: Child Custody Determinations Can't "Discount the Role" of Working Parent in Favor of Stay-at-Home Parent

Editor's Note: We invite comments and request that they be civil and on-topic. We do not moderate or assume any responsibility for comments, which are owned by the readers who post them. Comments do not represent the views of Reason.com or Reason Foundation. We reserve the right to delete any comment for any reason at any time. Report abuses.

  1. Stuck inside on a rainy lockdown day and what do I get?
    A Star Wars article. Now if it was Dune.

    1. Arrakis. Desert planet.

      1. “God created Arruckus to annoy the Faithful.”

      2. Let’s hope the new Dune movie is better than the utter disaster than that David Lynch movie made in 1984. I love David Lynch’s other works, but that movie was a dumpster fire. I haven’t been excited about a movie in years. Too bad Jodorowsky never got to make his Dune movie. Salvador Dali was gonna be the Emperor, Pink Floyd was gonna do the soundrack, Giger was gonna do the art.

        1. I love that movie. Is it true to the book? Hell no. Is it a great movie? Hell yes. The problem with all Dune movies that stay mostly true to the book is that the story in the book makes a bad movie. If you want a good movie, you have to change the story a bit. Either do that or stick so close to the book that you end up with a long series instead of one movie. And then it’s kind of boring with an unsatisfying ending.

          The new movie will not be good. Sorry. They changed Liet Kynes into a woman ffs. Josh Brolin as Gurney Halleck? Fuck off.

          1. Well, the new Dune movie is only the first half of the book.

          2. This is why I often silently pray to any Power that whoever has the rights to adapt Joe Haldeman’s The Forever War, doesn’t.

            1. I just read that last year. I loved it!

              1. It is terrific. The sequel is odd.

      3. De Gualle was worse than Montgomery when it came to believing his own press. There was absolutely no reason strategically to liberate Paris. And his insistence that it be done by French troops despite the US actually having done most of the heavy lifting was the height of arrogance. Then his betrayal of NATO… Yeah, de Gualle was a total pompous asshat.

    2. Stuck inside on a rainy lockdown day and what do I get?
      A Star Wars Trump article. Now if it was Dune.

  2. The problem with the latest Star Wars is bad writing. The idea a female hero cannot be allowed to be flawed and have character growth or really have to learn anything. A disrespect towards the the original trilogy’s main characters. Two directors over three episodes who trash each other’s plot points. A generally, prickly, sullen, passive aggressive attitude towards any criticism amounting to outright disgust at the built in fan base. Rehashing the plots of the two original movies, poorly. In the last movie, you two character deaths milked for pathos that are immediately reset. Etc., etc.

    “Knowing that the First Order’s army is made up of kidnapped child soldiers who were ripped from their families and trained to kill, are we really meant to enjoy the spectacle of them running, screaming, helplessly trapped in their ship and dying en masse as it crashes and burns?”

    Their ships are equipped with planet killer weapons and their leadership have been known to use them indiscriminately as well as being the worst kind of authoritarians. So yes, actually.

    “In the real world, bots sow chaos on social platforms, A.I. sex dolls create consent controversies, and Jordan Peterson’s YouTube channel just might be a rabbit hole to alt-right radicalization.”

    How about we do not accept the Left’s paranoid and demented delusions as facts?

    1. George Lucas told the Chicago Tribune that it was “really about the Vietnam War, and that was the period where Nixon was trying to run for a [second] term, which got me to thinking historically about how do democracies get turned into dictatorships? Because the democracies aren’t overthrown; they’re given away.”

      Explains a lot that George Lucas was right there with Pauline Kael. Nixon wasn’t just “trying” to run for a second term, he won in an historic landslide because he was wildly popular. But sure, pretend that taking 49 states in the election is somehow imposing a dictatorship on the ruins of a democracy and ignore the fact the heroes of the resistance turned out to be Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders and Che Guevara. If you want the perfect Star Wars movie, it’s The Phantom Menace where, after an interminable meeting of the UN, our heroes have elected Palpatine as Chancellor, agreed to train the young Darth Vader, and given us Jar-Jar Binks as a cultural rallying point.

      1. Whenever the Democrats lose to the GOP, in the mind of the left, it is a blow against democracy (leaving aside we aren’t a fucking democracy).

      2. “he won in an historic landslide because he was wildly popular”

        1) Part of the reason for that popularity is that he was lying to Americans about that war.

        2) Another part was the conservatives’ overt racism, in a country that was substantially more bigoted than today’s America is.

        I recognize the Republican Party has apologized for its Nixon-era racism, but that doesn’t erase or excuse it.

        1. 1) Of course he was lying, same as the Pentagon and the CIA and all the war profiteers. But also the same as the likes of Jane Fonda and Tom Hayden and John Kerry and Jerry Rubin and Stokely Carmichael and John Lennon and on and on and on. They were lying about being pro-peace, they were pro-communist revolutionaries whose heroes were the men with the strength and determination and moral certainty to be willing to murder tens of millions of human beings in order to shape their imagined perfect societies. And as much as they were lying about being pro-peace, they were lying even more to themselves about being the good guys.

          2) The United States has never been as racist and sexist and bigoted and evil as it is right at this moment, but still far less than it will be next year. Haven’t you heard? We elected Literal Hitler specifically so he could round up everybody who’s not a member of the “Master Race” (kind of ironic that they’re all inbred moron Bible-thumping anti-science bigots too stupid to realize that far from being a Master Race they are in fact sub-human scum destined to extinction) and exterminate them once and for all.

        2. Still pushing the myth about the southern strategy I see. And as for your first poont Nixon’s strategy from day one was to extract the US from the Vietnam quagmire Johnson and Kennedy created. Much like how Eisenhower had to clean up the mess in Korea that Truman started.

          1. Much like how Eisenhower had to clean up the mess in Korea that Truman started.

            Unfortunately the mess in Vietnam was [re-]ignited by Eisenhower too. Being talked into the domino theory and out of the military-industrial-congressional complex defies a man who otherwise made some really good decisions in his life.

            1. Eisenhower’s weakness was a willingness to try a placate our European allies. Stopping Patton from cutting off the retreating Germans during Operation Cobra and Operation Market Garden come to mind. Vietnam was another example of this. He was originally talked into it by the French.

              1. Eisenhower’s weakness was a willingness to try a placate our European allies.

                It was his strength as well. His ability to get massive egos to work together towards a common goal was why he was selected Supreme Allied Commander. Unfortunately he and the rest of Washington were petrified of communism. That is why Vietnam wasn’t handed to the Viet Minh at the end of World War II and the only possible reason to put up with de Gaulle.

                1. De Gualle was worse than Montgomery when it came to believing his own press. There was absolutely no reason strategically to liberate Paris. And his insistence that it be done by French troops despite the US actually having done most of the heavy lifting was the height of arrogance. Then his betrayal of NATO… Yeah, de Gualle was a total pompous asshat.

            2. I thought it was Kim Il-sung, not Truman, who created that mess in Korea.

              1. Truman’s decision to fight a limited war, a police action turned it into a quagmire.

        3. “the conservatives’ overt racism…
          the Republican Party… its Nixon-era racism”

          Which party was the antebellum pro-slavery party?
          What party was Chief Justice Roger B. Taney and all the Supreme Court justices who ruled in Dred Scott v. Sandford a member of?
          Which party did the architects for the The Chinese Exclusion Act and the Geary Act belong to?
          Who was the party that controlled the Klan?
          Which party enacted every single one of the Jim Crow laws?
          Which party drove the Blacks out of the civil service?
          Which party interned the Japanese?
          Who was the party that came up with ” separate but equal”?
          Who was the party of the “Solid South”?
          What was the party of George Wallace, Jim Clark, Bull Connor, Ross Barnett, Albert Boutwell, Laurie Pritchett and every other elected segregationist in the 60s?
          Which party’s members filibustered the Civil Rights Act of 64?
          Which party’s members filibustered the Fair Housing bill?

          (Hint: It wasn’t the Republicans)

          1. You forgot: Which was the party of much-mourned KKK Grand Wizard Robert Byrd?

        4. And another part was the radical (at the time) platform of George McGovern. Being scared of McGovern was not necessarily an endorsement of Nixon.

        5. @Kirkland as faggy and stupid as ever. Haven’t drank turpentine yet, fuckwad waste of air and space?

      3. Nixon wasn’t just “trying” to run for a second term, he won in an historic landslide because he was wildly popular.

        No. He won in landslide because his opponent was wildly unpopular. That’s the only reason.

    2. A.I. sex dolls create consent controversies

      Excuse me, what??

      1. Oh, it was discussed. Don’t forget, we’ve all but exhausted the meaningful debate topics and genuine outrages. We’re left now to inventing new ones every day.

      2. Pretty soon they’ll be interning teenage boys en masse, because their gym socks and boxes of tissues did not consent.

    3. Hollywood needs to learn how to write heroic female characters that aren’t Mary Sues. My current favorite female character is Kim Wexler from Better Call Saul. That’s how you write a strong woman.

      1. Most of the time even when they try they fail and the character turns into a Mary Sue. Example ST:Discovery. Michael was started out as a criminal and traitor that was distrusted by her peers and soon became the savior of the Galaxy and everyone seems to have forgiven her treason.

        1. Never watched Discovery. I stopped with DS9, which I consider the best series from the ones I watched. And of course DS9 is just a Babylon 5 ripoff.

      2. Wexler rocks. Saving Jimmy from Lalo showed why you don’t mess with lawyers.

    4. The problem with the new star wars starts way before writing. It was bad concepts all the way down. TFA was just ‘let’s redo A New Hope, because new stuff is scary’. No character growth allowed, nothing can change. Han Solo it retconned back to before his face-heel turn, ffs. And since it’s decades later, nothing being allowed to change is what caused the ridiculous ‘somehow we’re still rebels’ thing in the first place.

      1-3 may have been bad, but at least Lucas recognized he couldn’t just repackage 4-6 and tell them again.

      1. The prequels were the best trilogy of the series. Anakin’s descent to the dark side was the most compelling story told.

    5. All this. Also, they threw out decades of established lore that was popular with the fans, and instead decided to build up their own bullshit from the ground up, and like you said, changed direction twice over 3 movies.

  3. Or maybe, just maybe, someone got all greedy after finding a western in space can make a bazillion dollars, and hollywood writers can’t write?

    1. I agree with your take, with the added caveat that it had to be edited to get past the Chinese censor. All about the money, why else would they have brought in JJ Abrams.

    2. I agree. Regardless of what Lucas said, I think everything after the original Star Wars (Part IV) was milking it, with all the p.r. being post-hoc rationalization. Lucas turned out a great pastiche of the old movie serials with more expensive production values, hitting all the inside jokes for movie buffs. It was time to move on, but Hollywood finds original ideas too few and far between.

    3. Spot on. The first was just a space opera and had no hidden meaning, no philosophy. Maybe Lucas had some grand vision, but it sure didn’t show — rebels vs empire was as political as it got.

      People like to pretend the second was good because it had a political background continuing the rebel vs empire theme. Hogwash — Lucas threw all that crap in along with his long-term story arc which ruined the entire series. And somehow the public lapped up the idea of elites being the good guys who are saving the empire from the bad guys who corrupted parliament.

      And Han shot first. Revisionism like that is exactly the attitude which ruined all movies after the first. Stalin FTW!

  4. “It is also true that health care in America is too expensive. We spend more than $248 billion a year on an entire industry of billers, coders and IT professionals whose purpose is to resolve the friction between insurance companies and physicians in the payment of bills. No other country organizes payment like this, and the waste is astounding.”

    Y’all we should get rid of for profit health insurance companies. They serve no useful purpose and that money could used for things that are actually useful. Tell me why I’m wrong. Tell why we need insurance companies.

    1. According to Richard Epstein’s analysis, they help control costs.

    2. Instead, assume markets do their job of finding solutions to failures (market failures are an oxymoron) and ask where those failures came from. The answer in health care is government intrusion — tax codes, tax code loopholes, enforcing the AMA’s occupational licensing, government strangulation of drugs, the list has no end.

      Get government out of the way and you’d have a much cheaper, faster, better health care industry. It’s already the best in the world — look at how many foreigners come to the US for procedures they can’t get at home. Infant mortality stats look bad because other countries don’t try to save as many premature births as the US does, and/or don’t count deaths in the first few days as live births.

      The more government involves itself in anything, the more it fucks it up.

    3. “Y’all we should get rid of for profit health insurance companies.”

      You should fuck off and die.

    4. Yeah, sure. And let’s also get rid of for-profit entertainment companies, especially those middle entities who take stuff already made, mark up their costs, and charge us money to watch stupid movies.

      A need for insurance companies?
      1. A way to voluntarily pool resources and share risks.
      2. A better solution than mandatory government programs.
      3. Financial incentives for policy holders to alter behavior–but again by choice.
      4. A tax on stupid (instead of a tax on success).

    5. Health insurance companies negotiate rates for patients while collecting fees in a similar way that unions negotiate pay for workers in exchange for dues. This helps keep patient costs down. Tell me why I’m wrong. Tell why insurance companies serve no useful purpose.

    6. Tell me why I’m wrong. Tell why we need insurance companies.

      How about we start with the real problem, government: tell us why we need government.

      Insurance companies are a very natural and useful market solution to spreading financial risk. If you can’t understand that, you are so ignorant of markets and real life and financial risk itself; spreading financial risk goes back thousands of years, at the very least to the first merchant ships owned by multiple people to spread the risk, and development of the first maritime laws spreading risk of cargo loss even when the ship itself survived bad weather.

      Government is even older, because despots and thieves and “might makes right” have always been the credo of those with more brawn than brains. So why don’t you try enlightening us on why thugs have any moral right to tell everyone else what to do?

    7. I’ve fixed this for you so you have a chance at recognizing your error from your own (fixed) words:

      No other countrygovernment organizes payment like this, and the waste is astounding.

      Hint: government fucks up everything it touches. Look a little bit closer at every ill you see in society, and you will discover government.

      1. Government causes date rape? Who knew?

        1. Bill Clinton?

          1. Joe Biden?

    8. What makes health insurance different from auto insurance?

      1. If you total a car you can get another one?

    9. Thanks for clearing that up, Axelblood.

    10. Don’t like for profit health insurance companies? Then don’t purchase a policy from one. Any hospital will be happy to take cash.

    11. And Medicare and Medicaid billing has none of those flaws. It is simpler and more friction free than…

      I’m sorry, I can’t keep the joke going. It’s too absurd

  5. “An American military operation no longer takes the form of a few plucky pilots standing up to a massive, organized, military-industrial machine; we are the machine, the uniformed leadership with our finger on a button, obliterating our enemies from space (where no one can hear them scream).”

    Surely this writer is aware that the Empire was always supposed to represent the American military? The Rebels were a stand-in for the Viet Cong. She even quotes Lucas saying the original movies were about Vietnam.

    Lucas is also on record comparing Obama to a Jedi. I guess it’s true: Obama did have a strong influence over the weak-minded.

    1. Lucas can make a entertaining film, but his writing skills are only occasionally good and his political judgment is standard 70s leftist. Which makes his politics look sane and reasonable only compared to the current crop of Leftists.

      This is the guy who made an intended breakout character that was offensive to everyone.

      1. Interestingly his movie THX1138 is more close to todays lockdowns that the totalitarian left just doesn’t want let go of

  6. What happened to the idea that it was a parody-cum-celebration of the old adventure serials — no heavy thinking required? At that the 1977 entry succeeded excellently.

    1. Exactly. It’s just a movie.

      1. Nope, there are Jedi orders now and Force churches. People take this stuff seriously.

    2. He used a series of archetypes from mythology and folklore and interweaved them with prevalent unconventional beliefs of the day.

      Luke Skyalker is the knight-errant. Chewbacca was a Sasquatch.

      He took archetypes from folklore and married them to the paranormal beliefs of average people in the ’70s to connect with them–of course Big Foot is from a UFO! Now it all makes sense.

    3. With time Lucas felt he needed to prove it was more than old fashioned entertainment to show he has liberal credentials

  7. “That was the period where Nixon was trying to run for a [second] term, which got me to thinking historically about how do democracies get turned into dictatorships? Because the democracies aren’t overthrown; they’re given away.”

    Interesting fact – The Roman senate continued much as it had for six centuries after the establishment of the empire. In the east, the senate in Constantinople continued until the 14th century.

    Most of our divisions of how and when things change are retrospective. We’ll probably become an empire long before we call ourselves one–if we aren’t one already.

    If you allow slaves to pick their own masters, that doesn’t mean they aren’t slaves, and if you let the people pick their own emperors, that doesn’t mean they aren’t in in empire either.

    1. It comes across most clearly when the most frightening thing to invoke is that some sector of life is relatively unregulated.

    2. If you allow slaves to pick their own masters, that doesn’t mean they aren’t slaves, and if you let the people pick their own emperors, that doesn’t mean they aren’t in in empire either.

      You just nailed some of the many reasons why I no longer vote.

      1. I realize confession is part of recovery, but you really don’t need to keep telling us you’re a lazy drunk, we got it already.

    3. The US became an empire in 1898.

    4. We’ve been an empire since the Spanish-American War.

      1. Florida has a sad.

  8. “A stranger comes to town”

  9. Lucas was so clever with his political commentary that the villain of The Phantom Menace was named “Nute Gunray” because it sounds pretty close to Newt Gingrich.

    1. Probably why they blew up that moon base too.

  10. The problem with “Star Wars” is it’s a ripoff of “Valérian and Laureline” a French graphic novel from the 60s. Once Lucas ran out of source material he had nothing.

  11. The two biggest ways in which Star Wars changed us:

    1) Merchandising.

    They threw Lucas the merchandising rights because they weren’t thought to be worth anything. Of course, this destroyed the franchise because afterwards, selling merchandising and branding rights became the primary purpose of the films. The reason Burger King and others pay to brand Star Wars cups and shit is because sales typically triple at stores that are branding that way when the movies come out.

    2) Before Star Wars, nobody in Hollywood really believed there was a market for people who wanted to see a movie more than once.

    They had catalogs where your local school could rent reels of a movie to show through a projector for one day–they might charge you a couple thousand dollars for the reel. And your school would do that as a fund raiser for the basketball team’s new uniforms or something and send the kids out in a contest to sell tickets–mostly to their parents. Unless the movie was shown in edited form on television with commercials, that was pretty much the only way you were ever going to see a movie after it exited the theaters. The studios didn’t want to sell copies of the movie to consumers because they thought the only reason people would want to do that was so they could charge other people to see it.

    It wasn’t until Star Wars sat in the theater for more than a year–mostly due to people coming back to see it again and again–that Hollywood realized that there was money to be made by selling copies of a movie directly to consumers because they really did want to see a movie more than once! No doubt, porn would have driven a lot of VHS sales anyway, but it was Star Wars that convinced Hollywood to make their back catalogs available to consumers that way. From every movie you ever rented at Blockbuster to the existence of Netflix (which started out as a DVD home delivery business and still has a substantial business doing that), you can thank Star Wars for all of that.

    1. Before Star Wars, nobody in Hollywood really believed there was a market for people who wanted to see a movie more than once.
      Actually many movies. especially blockbusters were re-released by the studios.
      “Gone with the Wind” maintained it’s box office championship this way. It was even recut to widescreen and presented in 70mm in the late 60s. The broadcasting rights were sold for megabucks in 1976 and TV viewership set records.

      I saw many films in re-release that I was too young to see when they first came out.
      In the days of the giant downtown theaters some movies played over a year much of that was repeat business. “Sound of Music” played for over two years at some theaters. “South Pacific” played in one London theater continuously for 4 years.

      As for marketing, Disney learned that very early. There were selling collectibles from the 30s “Sleeping Beauty”

      1. True. But how many of those see-over-and-over were made for original release between 1967 and 1977? Practically none. That’s why in that era were were re-watching movies made earlier!

        About the same time movie houses started multiplexing (and likely for that reason), feature films became “disposable”, and remained so for a long time. You needed more releases to fill those screening rooms, but you didn’t need them for long.

        I remember when it was routine for the same features to be playing at a house for 2 months. People had air conditioning at home, didn’t need to go to an indoor movie to cool off in the summer.

        1. By the early 60’s Studios made big bucks selling the broadcasting rights to the 3 networks. You could always catch a movie on tv a few years after general theater release. Afterwards they were sold to independent stations. Janus films, which controlled a lot of foreign and art house movies opened their catalog to TV broadcasting. Many of the Criterion collection movies were from Janus and I saw many of these broadcast on indie station WGN.
          1976 was the year RCA marketed it’s VHS VCR, soon another market opened up for viewing movies. There was no need to re-release films to theaters.
          Now with Blu Ray and 4k and inexpensive large screen high def tvs there shouldn’t be a need for theaters at all.

    2. Actually up to about a decade before Star Wars, there had been some movies people would pay to go back to, usually with other company, but you’re right, by 1977 there practically weren’t any more.

      The studios were right that individuals would have bought prints only to share the costs with many others, just because the media themselves were so expensive, especially in competition with other entertainment options like TV. Not many people had sound projectors, and those who did might have only ones with a magnetic rather than optical sound track, and feature length would’ve been a LOT of 200- or 300-foot reels. Daddy used to rent silent Castle Films (often B&W prints of color shorts) to show on our 16 mm Bell & Howell.

      1. Lots of institutions, though, would have movie nights as you describe — a movie maybe 5-10 years old shown, usually outdoors in the summer, on what I guess was a 1-day license to an audience such as a beach club or motel guests, sometimes as part of a multiple feature, just as a perk of membership or being a paid guest. I never experienced it for fundraising as you describe, but that seems about right. There were also dedicated catalogs of such for nonprofits and institutions such as nursing homes and libraries which would do it on a weekly license.

    3. While merchandising definitely existed before Star Wars, where Star Wars innovated was in creating the action figure. Before star wars, there were toy soldiers (who couldn’t be posed), and dolls for boys (the forgettable GI Joes from the 50s). Kenner’s action figures were hugely successful, as were Hasbro’s GI Joe shortly thereafter.

  12. ‘George Lucas told the Chicago Tribune that it was “really about the Vietnam War…”‘

    Yeah, I don’t think so. Old Georgey is famous for making up shit he supposedly was thinking while making Star Wars because it sounds good in the interview he’s currently giving

    1. There were directors and others claiming in the 70s that there movies made in the 50s were really really about “McCarthyism”. “The Invasion of the Body Snatchers” is an example.

      1. That’s a great movie for its budget, especially the 1970s version. When the whole point is that the monsters look like regular humans, you’ve not only increased the horror quotient, you’ve saved a bunch in costumes and effects.

      2. Some of it was. “The Robe,” for example, is a blatant allegory of McCarthyite persecution of Hollywood commies.

    2. Right. If Star Wars was about Vietnam Lucas is/was deranged.

  13. Nobody mentions it, but the Resistance would’ve been a lost cause from the get-go if the new Republic had decided to get serious about gun control.

    Nobody mentions it for a reason. I’d like to think Star Wars writing was that meaningful, but I’m guessing that we’re reading a little much into what are in reality just plot contrivances and deus ex machina.

    1. Like they could get rid of guns in a galaxy spanning civilization. Personally Star Wars hasn’t held up well. When I saw the original as an 11 year old it was awesome, now it’s kinda shitty. The Empire could build the Death Star and yet it’s only defenses are slow firing proton cannons. A few relatively dumb missiles full of ball bearings could have easily taken out the Rebel ships.

      1. Oh and don’t get me started on the fact that ships at light speed can hit other ships is canon now. It makes the original Death Star attack just beyond stupid.

        1. The Model T looks dumb next to an Explorer. But you wouldn’t have the one without the other.

          1. Only if the Explorer runs on water and everyone was saying “Oh the Model T could have run on water too.”

          2. It’s more like if the Model T with added flame paint job suddenly gained the ability to float on water. Hyperdrive tech didn’t change significantly for thousands of years as evidenced by the plug and play death nebula beacon. The idea that no one would have tried ramming speed at any point over those millennia is idiotic.

        2. And you’re not even going to mention the explosions and the sounds of the explosions in space? (“In space, no one can hear you scream” certainly did not apply in the Star Wars universe.)

          1. It doesn’t apply to most Science Fiction. Some Star Wars authors did try to explain this by stating it was the residual oxygen burning off in space. Not a great explanation.

            1. But at least it recognized that science doesn’t support the explosions, fires and noise in a vacuum.

          2. Movie logic and what it takes to make a movie enjoyable to watch aren’t the same thing.

        3. and, like Star Trek, they skip the whole problem with people aging at different rates when they travel near light speed.

          1. They travel faster than light.

          2. The warp theory, which actually is a thing, posits that you warp space around yourself, creating a bubble of normal space. You actually aren’t travelling faster than lighter but are moving space around you faster than light.

      2. Meh, the empire was over-confident and never imagined the rebels doing something insane as a last-gasp suicide attack with every single pilot they had left, which still had a near-0 chance of success. I can give the script the benefit of the doubt enough to buy something like that.

        There’s some truly fantastic set building in those movies though, not to mention the sound design and music. Smoke a fat blunt or two and sit back and enjoy the craftsmanship that went into creating those crazy ass movies.

        1. I saw the world premiere in SF in 1977, Thursday night, almost by chance — had no idea what to expect — third row — and I swear the entire audience gave a standing ovation when the modeler credits rolled by at the end.

          1. None of that actually haopened.

          2. Star Wars didn’t have what would be considered a premiere. It opened in 32 theaters on Wednesday, 25 May, 1977 (The Coronet in San Francisco was one). The first showing would probably have been in a city on the East Coast.

        2. If a ship at light speed can hit stuff their over confidence verges on insanity. The Death Star doesn’t even really make sense. With their technology you can just push a huge asteroid down onto a planet and destroy it.

      3. It’s all ball bearings these days.

  14. This video shows what a train wreck Lucas’ original vision was and how Star Wars was saved in the edit.
    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=GFMyMxMYDNk
    Lucas was lucky in the people he had around him and when he got the idea that he was some sort of filmmaking genius his worst instincts came to the fore.

    1. Thanks for that — amazing how Lucas keeps on editing it so stupidly (Han shot first!!!) and yet thinks editing is his strong suit.

  15. In 2020, Star Wars isn’t just political; it’s a microcosm of the fractious, tribal, exhausted landscape of American politics

    Yes, the two “tribes” being those who want a progressive, authoritarian, collectivist technocracy, and those of us who prefer a classically liberal society with small government.

    The Force Awakens marked the dawn of the Trump era: Released on the eve of the 2016 election, it captured a brief moment of liberal optimism—a time when the future of both Star Wars and the presidency seemed destined to be female.

    “Liberal” is newspeak for “illiberal” and “collectivist”, and Darth Vader turned out to be female.

    I think it’s pretty obvious that the author is coming down on the sides of collectivism and opposes classical liberalism.

  16. Another article on the sequels written by someone who has not seen them, only read other people’s articles about them. And then adds a ham-fisted attempt to link them to the real world.

    Well, at least its not ‘orange man bad’ this time around.

    1. Unlike Star Trek in which Roddenberry made no attempt to hide the underlying themes. In TOS Klingons were the Russians, Romulans the Chinese (the secret empire, this was before Nixon opened up China) that we had fought a war with (Korea) but had little interactions with after the war, the Vulcans the Japanese (in the first season the even referred to the Vulcans as a conquered race), the Federation the UN or NATO. There were themes about racism, segregation, women’s rights etc. TNG explored a post Cold War world, with the Federation exploring it’s new relationship with an old for, the Klingons Empire and even mirrored the power struggles in the new Russian Federation. The Borg were a loss of individuality as we became more dependent on technology, the Ferengi a criticism of materialism and unhindered capitalism (I personally liked the Ferengi).
      Star Wars was simple entertainment (at least the original trilogy) whereas Star Trek was definitely a societal critique, especially while Roddenberry was alive. Voyage and Enterprise less so, although DS9 did more so. But even Voyager, Enterprise, Discovery and Picard at least attempted to weave in some social critique.

      1. What is more science fiction authors at the time of TOS were exploring some deeper themes, Braddenbury, Asimov, Heinlein, Dicks, Orwell etc.

      2. The Trouble with Tribbles was a clear anti-immigration screed.

        Nah, just f*ing with ya’s.

  17. (Nobody mentions it, but the Resistance would’ve been a lost cause from the get-go if the new Republic had decided to get serious about gun control.)

    Jesus Christ. ‘The Resistance’ is the New Republic’s actual military – written and named by people who, again, never saw the movies and were just interested in making ‘Star Wars, but, like, different’.

    Star Wars had the Rebellion, TFA was deliberately built to be basically the same as SW, so TFA needed a ‘rebellion’ even though having a group of autonomous fighters makes no sense when they would be the actual government at that point.

    1. Yes the New Republic defeated the Empire and governed a good portion of the Galaxy buy didn’t have an endogenous military? That never made any sense. Also, how did the First Order, built from the rump of the Empire, have the resources to build it’s fleets? Disney should have just made the Zahn trilogy. It was so much better.

      1. The biggest problem was always that the sequels were crafted by a team of Millennial and late Gen-X women who were never all that interested in Star Wars, headed by a woman who had ridden on Spielberg’s coattails for 30 years and was desperate to make her own mark.

        The result was similar to what Filmation did when it made She-ra–it took the template of a highly successful pop culture franchise and changed the gender of the primary hero. They saw the archetype, but never understood what made it compelling.

        1. The whole point of post modernism (leftism) is to deny the veracity of archetypes

      2. The Zahn trilogy is great.
        You see Han & Leia’s relationship, conflicts among the new republic leadership, and Luke coming into a mature understanding of the force.

        I also would’ve liked to see a story based around the new republic becoming the new tyranny with various politicians jockeying for power.

  18. The simple truth is, Star Wars was a action sci-fi adventure with clear cut good vs evil arch type of movie (Plus politically neutral) . When you throw a bunch of politics in this kind of entertainment it will flop hard. People watch things like this to escape reality, Not to have politics crammed down are throats.

  19. What did the Star Wars franchise in was bad writing and even worse choices. And the blatant insults to long-time fans was the final, killing blow.

    Making it about divided politics is basically accepting the premise that people who don’t like the Disney trilogy are just misogynists. Yeah, that’s why the long-time fans all hated the strong, independent figure or Princess Laia. It also explains why Rogue One, with its female protagonist was a box office bomb, while the Han Solo movie, centered on a male character, was a huge box office success. Right? Terrible writing with poor characterizations that even Mark Hamill openly questioned had NOTHING to do with it, that’s all just Trump supporters’ talking points.

    Yeah right, tell me another!

  20. Some of you clingers seem unusually cranky this morning.

    Did you forget to chug your disinfectant?

    1. Brush your teeth and put on deodorant for once in your life Rev. You’ve got a flock waiting for you in your clapboard church.

  21. “Star Whores” is about politics? Who knew? Not me!

    Then I got to thinking about it… And that’s correct! To “grok” this, read “Parliament of Whores” by PJ O’rourke
    https://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0802139701/reasonmagazinea-20/

    The BEST (“star”) whores who make the most money, are NOT the prettiest, or the best in bed… They are the ones most talented at lying (faking their love for, and fascination with, some greasy but rich old geezer) about how they adore the old fat fart who never could treat women nicely enough to get a long-term girlfriend! So good hookers are actually actresses, who act as if they “love you long time” to give you the “girlfriend experience”!

    So what do star politicians and star whores have in common? They both pretend, OOOOOH so sincerely, to “love you long time”! But in both cases, their orgasms are all fake! Fake you long time, Jake, you AND your trouser snake!

    1. Maybe so, but when politicians jerk you around, you don’t get a damn thing other than having any hopes you had let down and your take home pay a bit smaller. At least with the Star Whores you mention, you get some brief periods of actual pleasure.

      I have far more respect for practitioners of the world’s oldest profession than I do for ANY of those who tout themselves as “our leaders.”

  22. Begin winning $120-$200 every hours for working on the web from your home for scarcely any hours every day… Get ordinary installment on a week by week premise… All you need is a PC, web association and a little available time… Peruse increasingly here Read more here>https://bit.ly/2V0yjLa

  23. I wonder if they think up the toys first, then write plots featuring the characters the toys represent?

    Maybe not, but it’s as plausible as being a metaphor for modern politics.

    1. I shouldn’t say “toys” or “dolls,” of course. I should say action figures.

      1. Somebody’s never watched Saturday morning cartoons.

    2. It worked for Hasbro with GI Joe and Transformers. But neither pretended to be anything but what they were.
      Now I know.
      And knowing is half the battle… GI Joooeeee.

      1. Read the story of the real GI Joe (Mitchell Paige) some time… amazing:

        https://www.reviewjournal.com/opinion/g-i-joe-was-just-a-toy-wasnt-he/

        “Coming up at dawn, battalion executive officer Major Odell M. Conoley was the first to discover how many able-bodied United States Marines it takes to hold a hill against two regiments of motivated, combat-hardened infantrymen who have never known defeat.” (the answer is…. ONE).

    3. You’re not far off there. From a 1977 interview:

      https://www.rollingstone.com/movies/movie-news/george-lucas-the-wizard-of-star-wars-2-232011/

      “One of my motivating factors for doing the film, along with all the other ones, was that I love toys and games. And so I figured, gee, I could start a kind of a store that sold comic art, and sold 78 records, or old rock ‘n’ roll records that I like, and antique toys and a lot of things that I am really into; stuff that you can’t buy in regular stores. I also like to create games and things, so that was part of the movie, to be able to generate toys and things. Also, I figured the merchandising along with the sequels would give me enough income over a period of time so that I could retire from professional filmmaking and go into making my own kind of movies, my own sort of abstract, weird, experimental stuff.”

      1. Well, good for him.

        And he got the weird part down later. I’m not sure about the abstract and experimental stuff.

      2. Certainly this is probably the origin of the “looks-like-Boba-Fett-even-though-he-isn’t” series. Probably the origin of Baby Yoda too.

    4. Of course. The irony is that the toys and action figures from the Disney Star Wars films have not sold well at all. Most end up in bargain bins or just collect dust.

      It goes to show you that even kids care about quality.

  24. “Jordan Peterson’s YouTube channel just might be a rabbit hole to alt-right radicalization.”

    uh, what? It seems in the last couple years Reason has gone from reasoned to yet another garbage outlet. I really miss being able to trust this magazine.

    1. Think that was meant as tongue in check, but hard to tell with the Voxplainers being so prevalent here these days.

    2. Totally out of left field. I almost stopped reading at that moment.

  25. “The battle that mattered was an intimate, secret stand-off between Rey, Palpatine, and Ben Solo…”

    You mean, like the secret stand-off battle between Luke, Palpatine, and Darth Vader?

    Yeah that one. The one they ripped off from themselves. This was never a sequel, it’s a reboot. And like all reboots suffers from the flaws of the original, the unrealistic expectations of the audience, and the incompetence of filmmakers who think lens flares are pretty cool.

    1. They should have made the Zahn Trilogy. Yes it had a similar story arc but was better written with better characters.

      1. And Mara Jade redemption story arc was much better than Rey’s.

    2. So is Ben Solo supposed to be Mitt Romney?

  26. I just watched Episodes 2 & 3 with my kids yesterday. The senate keeps giving Palpatine emergency powers to deal with the separatist crisis.

    I told my kids to be wary of anyone that says they need emergency powers to act in a crisis. More often than not they’re going to turn out to be like the Emperor.

    1. Yes. Governor Whitmer anyone?

    2. Yep, and that’s the hilarious part. Lucas did a ham-fisted Iraq War allegory and ended up foreshadowing the actions of a whole bunch of state and local officials.

  27. Haven’t seen the last one, but what I want to know is: how is there a “resistance”?
    They lost 90% of their people in the 2nd one because of that dumbass escape plan.
    There were like 20 resistance fighters, max, left at the end of the movie.
    And, to be honest, no one really seemed all that upset that their compatriots had just been totally massacred

    1. Lando can be very persuasive.

      1. Could have been a recruiter for Auburn, if the Star Wars galaxy had football.

    2. They lost 90% of their people in the 2nd one because of that dumbass escape plan.

      General Hodor had a big ol’ plan.

  28. Are you looking for best mod apk paids app for free then you must visit our site for best 2020 free mods on Modlelo

  29. Kat overthinks this. Star wars was a lysergic movie, like Woodstock and Yellow Submarine. Without the hippie baggage it caught on and attracted hangers-on, lampreys, infiltrators, whacko ideologues and mystical brainwashers. The third iteration was a kiddie movie able to make any grownup spew. In a way it models the travails of the LP, with its really good 1972 platform scaring the schaisst out of the kleptocracy. Immediately it was misportrayed, infiltrated, diverted, polluted and sabotaged. Unlike the franchise, the LP is recovering.

    1. Was Johnson’s 3 percent showing the recovery, or just another infiltrator?

  30. That new Star Wars trilogy sucked, mostly because of bad writing and partly because of progressive activism. Putting a guy like Rian Johnson in charge of the second movie was especially weird; he monkeyed with the narrative and JJ Abrams foolishly and painfully tried to fix the damage in the third and all of this contributed to it’s colossal failure as a work of art. It still made lots of money, but hopefully it killed any thoughts of a fourth trilogy.

    Now if only reason could publish something about libertarianism…

      1. To soon… To soon. Brown Coats will rise again.

        1. I’ll settle for an in-depth look at The Expanse.

  31. All but checked out of the franchise after Finn, having never touched a light saber before (not to mention he has no powers whatsoever), managed to defeat Kylo Ren. After that… and much like many of the new movies… whats the point…apparently Jedi and The Force are about as worthless as the new movies.

    1. I kind of liked Finn going postal.. it was one of only a few emotional chords that struck true.

      Lightsabers are absurd weapons of course; ridiculously dangerous even in the hands of a skilled user. It suggests that only superhumans with mental powers could possibly wield one and not slice bits of themselves off in the process.

      1. and the last thing you want is the handle to have light saber lasers too, like Ren’s does.

        1. George should’ve quit the movies (or gotten more ‘operatic’) after video games became a thing. Once the game makers figured out that if you could control them without touching them, then there’s no reason to hold a lightsaber. Of course, once you figure that out, you start to question why ground forces don’t have air or orbital support, how ground forces consistently subvert interstellar occupation forces, etc.

  32. Your Alexa may not be colluding with Siri and Google to overthrow the government or kill you in your sleep, but she’s listening in on your conversations, collecting your data, and violating your privacy—and your trust. But whose fault is that?

    “Alexa, whose fault is it that you’re listening in on my conversations, collecting my data, and violating my privacy—and my trust?”

    1. “I don’t understand the question, but I believe you bought me Rich.”

  33. It looks more like these studio Fem-O-nists are not really interested in finding a new audience for these types of movies but are actively trying to ruin the experience for boys. Plus being Marxists adds the side benefit of bankrupting the privately owned companies they work for. As David Burge noted,
    1. Identify a respected institution.
    2. Kill it.
    3. Gut it.
    4. Wear its carcass as a skin suit, while demanding respect.

  34. What I want to know is, why is it called “The First Order” when it came after the Empire? And how did the rebels F it up so badly after they had won? And what Empire in its right mind would destroy multiple planets? Who’s going to pay the taxes to support the Empire? It’s like shutting down your state economy for some virus with a low fatality rate, cutting off your own sales tax receipts.

    1. It’s obvious. Tax the rich!

    2. “And what Empire in its right mind would destroy multiple planets?”

      Mao’s “Great Leap Forward” killed 10s of millions. Of course, that’s not the same thing at all, but I bring it up only to illustrate that governments historically have been plenty willing to kill off citizens. Just think of vaporizing a planet or three as merely a galactic empire scale dekulakization.

    3. “…It’s like shutting down your state economy for some virus with a low fatality rate, cutting off your own sales tax receipts.”

      Who in hell would be dumb enough to do that?
      Paging JFree and Hihn!

    4. What I want to know is, why is it called “The First Order” when it came after the Empire?

      The Red Letter Media guys reviewed Rise Of Skywalker and Mike made an off-the-cuff rationalization about ‘the versions of Palpatine’ that, while derivative writing, was still better than what turned out to be the actual explanation. Mike’s explanation turns out to accommodate this snafu as well.

  35. Daily dose of TV news overheard as wife watches in the other room:
    Sports guy interviews someone, who says ‘sport will open soon, but you’ll have to pass through some sort of thermal-testing station’.
    Yeah, we’ll be back to ‘normal’ real soon, the new ‘normal’ being something to behold.

  36. The Last Jedi did a bang up job of ruining the franchise! I believe the only real way to repair the damage is to simply reboot the story. Pretend the entire sequel trilogy just didn’t ever happen. Luke Skywalker is alive again and he is training jedi at his academy. Rey, Finn, Poe just never existed…

  37. but the franchise is more relevant than ever

    And… stopped reading.

    Anything that proceeds under the above assumption can’t be correct and is likely ‘inspired’ by Disney.

    Even if like the fact that Disney effectively turned classical piece of cultural art into an SJW diarrhea platform (imagine if A Streetcar Named Desire or Gone With The Wind were re-written or sequeled with with a black lesbian lead). The fact is, the franchise is well past it’s prime and Disney was stupid to buy in. It would be like buying Ford in the 70s and making the Gen 3 Mustang and declaring Ford to be more relevant than ever. I like Ford and think it’s as relevant as ever, but the 70s and 80s were clearly waning years culturally. Same with Disney now.

  38. and Jordan Peterson’s YouTube channel just might be a rabbit hole to alt-right radicalization.

    Wait, wat? I’ve never understand the raging hatred lefties seem to have for a guy who’s greatest sins seem to be that he advocates you take responsibility for your own life outcomes and that being forced to use made-up pronouns shouldn’t be in the government’s power.

    “alt-right radicalization”? Please. You literally must get all your info on this man from Vox or something.

  39. Dems are just pissed that it was Nixon who normalized relations with China.

    The Republic was a system of regional warfare and slavery with the Jedi as enforcers. The Republic created the clone army.

    The 8th movie was the story of how a rogue pilot managed to sabotage his admiral’s plans and ultimately get (almost) everyone killed.

    Fuck those assholes.

  40. Premiering almost exactly a year before our next presidential election, the film read like a flailing Hail Mary attempt to get things back on track…

    My high school English teacher used to ding me on papers when I failed to expound upon a statement like this. What does “get things back on track” mean? Back to spying on a house of Congress? Back to spying on journalists? Back to life, back to reality? Back to liking and therefore keeping a health care plan?

    Be less vague Kat Rosenfield.

  41. tahan tahan tenaga kita goyang santai

Please to post comments

Comments are closed.