Pennsylvania

Philadelphia Cops Arrested for Detaining a Man Without Cause

An investigation concluded that there was no way the officers could have seen a man using drugs as they said they did.

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|||Philadelphia Police Department/Office of Media Relations/Public Affairs
Philadelphia Police Department/Office of Media Relations/Public Affairs

Last April, Philadelphia Police Officers Matthew Walsh, 30, and Marvin Jones, 48, stopped a man, handcuffed him, and searched him and his vehicle. Walsh and Jones detained him for 15 minutes before driving him one block away and releasing him. On Wednesday, the officers were arrested and charged with a felony count of tampering with records and misdemeanor counts of criminal conspiracy, false imprisonment, obstructing administration of law, and official oppression.

According to a statement given to Reason by the Philadelphia Police Department, Walsh and Jones reported that they stopped the man for "apparently using narcotics." They said they searched him because he kept his hands in his pockets. The man, whom the department did not name, was not charged following the interaction and later filed a complaint against the officers.

An investigation was subsequently conducted by the Internal Affairs Bureau. After combing through surveillance footage and police records, investigators concluded there was no way that Jones and Walsh could have witnessed the suspected drug use. They also found that the man was compliant during the stop and search, which turned up nothing but prescription medication. The officers allegedly falsified their report following the stop and failed to disclose the search.

Walsh and Jones, who have worked for the department for four and 10 years, respectively, were arrested on Wednesday. Philadelphia Police Commissioner Richard Ross suspended the officers for 30 days. They will be dismissed at the end of their suspension.

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  1. Christinabucket they pissed off the wrong boss.

    1. I mean, was that guy the mayor’s kid working undercover for the DEA or something?

  2. On Wednesday, the officers were arrested and charged with a felony count of tampering with records and misdemeanor counts of criminal conspiracy, false imprisonment, obstructing administration of law, and official oppression.

    Sounds to me like procedures were followed, what’s the complaint?

  3. What’s wrong with that guy’s face?

    1. Look, I don’t know where you store your acorns…

    2. A little tobacco between the cheek and gum will last all day

  4. This is so infuriatingly haphazardly enforced. It’s the luck of the draw that this one incident inside of thousands actually led to a charge. I’m guessing it was the false report that really got them in trouble.

    Also, Filthadelphia.

    1. I’ve read the story twice and I really don’t even know what to say. We’ve got cops shooting unarmed homeowners in the face with written reports that completely contradict the video and the official reaction is… “meh, furtive movement…”.

      And now the tussle a guy in a street corner and not only are they suspended but arrested.

      It really makes you wonder if there’s something else going on with these two that pissed off the right people.

      The man, whom the department did not name

      The only thing I can come up with, is the “unnamed” man was connected to someone powerful at city hall.

      1. Maybe the “unnamed” man is the DA’s kid.

      2. Are we at the point where we should be happy with any scraps that fall off the table? I’m not sure.

  5. This sort of criminal activity from today’s AGW (armed government worker) happens to everyone, everywhere all over this country.

    Dealing with any AGW is always dengerous.

    American copping: You will trust these people at your peril, ESPECIALLY if you’ve done nothing wrong.

  6. My question is, what did these two cops REALLY do that got them in trouble? By all accounts, what they did is standard operating procedure in pretty much every PD from coast to coast. When we see this sort of targeted prosecution of officers, it’s because they crossed the thin blue line. They were seen as disloyal to other officers. Otherwise, they would have been protected by their fellow officers.

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