Police

Police Serve Warrant to Wrong Address, Kill Man Who Lives There

Authorities say they were trying to serve an arrest warrant for a man wanted for assault.

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Southaven Police Department

Ismael Lopez awoke to a commotion outside his front door on July 23rd, shortly before midnight. Moments later, he was dead.

A police officer shot Lopez after he allegedly refused to put down the gun he was holding when he answered the door. Police were looking to serve an arrest warrant for an assault that had occurred earlier that day. Only after Lopez had died did they realize their mistake: they had gone to the wrong house.

Lopez was not the man they were looking for, nor was he wanted by police for any outstanding warrants. His death was entirely preventable‚ÄĒanother casualty in the long list of victims of excessive force on the part of law enforcement.

It should go without saying that the above statement is not an indictment of all police officers, but it is nothing short of dishonest to attribute these sorts of incidents to just a few bad apples as people have often done in the past. The rot is much more severe than many Americans are willing to admit. As police departments across the country have become more militarized, incidents like these are far from unheard of, and it's impossible not to conclude that law-enforcement culture and norms play a role.

It's been over two weeks since Lopez was shot, and the names of the Southaven Police Department officers involved have yet to be released. While many police departments do release the names of those in "officer involved shootings," it's not a uniform practice across the country. Police union rules often govern when names are released to the public, if at all. According to a Washington Post report from 2016, around 20 percent of officers involved in fatal shootings do not have their names disclosed.

This practice undermines public trust in the police and prevents bad cops from being held accountable for their actions. Police officers do deserve some privacy protections, as all citizens do, but they are also given powers to take away a person's freedom and in some cases their life. Powers like those demand increased accountability to protect against abuse.

There have been protests outside the Southaven Police Department in the weeks following the shooting, with locals demanding an explanation for Lopez's death and greater transparency from the authorities. "We want the truth to come out. We want justice to be served for Mr. Lopez," said Pastor Rolando Rostro, the organizer of the protests, adding that "there's a lot of stuff that should've been released by now and those officers names should've; they serve the public."

When a local news channel asked the police department if the officer who fired shots was still patrolling the streets, the department responded, "We don't discuss personnel issues."

By refusing to disclose the names of the officers involved, there's no way of knowing if these individuals have been involved in similar incidents in the past. As Reason's Ed Krayewski has covered extensively before, there's no database or registry for police with histories of abuse of power and excessive force. It's about time we had one.

In Lopez's case, the initial police report appears to have been sloppily compiled, listing Lopez, who is Hispanic, as "caucasian" and labeling him as an "offender." The family's attorneys are calling for the resignation of the police chief and several other city officials for their handling of the case. They claim that the official story of investigators is not accurate, using pictures of the crime scene as evidence that Lopez was not pointing a gun out the door at officers as had been claimed previously.

"You can track the trace of the bullets. Three bullets went into that door and the door was shut when those bullets went into the door. My investigative team has concluded it was direct line. There were three bullets. There is no way the door was cracked open and someone was there," said Murray Wells, one of the family's attorneys.

The recently released death certificate would seem to partially confirm these claims.

In any case, Lopez would have been perfectly justified in grabbing his gun given the circumstances. Plenty of people wouldn't hesitate to grab a firearm if they heard banging at their door in the middle of the night. And given that he wasn't actually an "offender," Lopez would have had no reason to think it was the police on his porch.

It remains to be seen if charges will be placed against the officer who fired the fatal shot, but there's a good chance this case may turn out like the others before it. Saying "I feared for my life" will mean a lot coming from the officer involved. It may even get him/her out of criminal charges.

But Ismael Lopez probably feared for his life too. It's a shame he's not alive to say it.

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  1. Live in a thug’s house and you get treated like a thug.

    1. Live in some house vaguely nearby a thug’s, get treated like a thug

      1. Besides, he might have been keeping a dog, drinking tea and growing tomatoes.

        1. Or worse, using his camera to record a video of a public servant doing something – in public!

    2. WTF does that mean? He deserved to be executed?

  2. This practice undermines public trust in the police and prevents bad cops from being held accountable for their actions.

    Silly prole, the only bad cops are the ones who don’t shoot people indiscriminately, the ones who rat on the good cops who do shoot indiscriminately, and cops who might once have been dominatrixes.

  3. Delivering a warrant to the wrong house is super emarassing. I would have shot him too just from the burning shame and embarrassment.

  4. Bad boys bad boys
    Whatcha gonna do?
    Whatcha gonna do
    When they come for you?

    1. They’re going to hide behind their union lawyer, and department regulations that prevent the release of their names.

  5. The family’s attorneys are calling for the resignation of the police chief and several other city officials for their handling of the case.

    LOLOLOLOLOLOLOL!!!!1

  6. A police officer shot Lopez after he allegedly refused to put down the gun he was holding when he answered the door. Police were looking to serve an arrest warrant for an assault that had occurred earlier that day. Only after Lopez had died did they realize their mistake: they had gone to the wrong house.

    While I’m sure the cop will be found not guilty, Mr. Lopez’s actions are textbook self-defense.

    Cops burst into the wrong house and they should have no more protection than any other home invader.

    1. You have to be charged to be found not guilty. Return to step one.

      1. Disheartening, but you’re probably right.

        After all, it was a “mistake”.

    2. They didn’t “burst” in, they knocked and he answered.

      Lesson, if you feel you have to have a gun in your hand to answer the door – then it is too dangerous to answer the door.

      Just don’t.

      1. Hi Dumphy.

      2. Lesson 2. American cops are grossly inept.
        Lesson 3. American cops are a bunch of pussies.
        Lesson 4. American cops lack even the most basic humanity.
        Lesson 5. The chance of an American cop ever facing justice for their crimes is absolute zero.
        Lesson 6. We live in a police state.

        Just wanted to finish your thought there.

      3. and you automatically believe the police version

      4. Cops would have kicked the door in and shot him just the same except now they could say he was “barricaded” and refused to come out and fired his weapon first (they always do). They would say they didn’t have the wrong address, the man was in the wrong house.
        A person has every Right to kill an officer or shoot at one that is going to harm him. The courts will determine that later, after your funeral.

  7. Lopez was not the man they were looking for, nor was he wanted by police for any outstanding warrants.

    This kinda makes it seem like we’d be okay with police shooting an otherwise wanted man dead in his home or that shooting someone dead in their home and then looking for an outstanding warrant for them is a reasonable policy.

    1. Probably half or so of people who read this will still say, “Well cops have a hard job, we need to cut them some slack.” If he was even an alleged criminal that number would probably rise to 75%.

    2. Also, if I’m a home invader, the first thing I shout going through the door is “POLICE!”

      1. No home invader would ever do that because impersonating an officer is illegal!

      2. And the victim probably couldn’t tell the difference until he noticed that his dog was still alive.

    3. Lopez mistake was unlike the cops he hesitated before shooting unknown intruders into his home.
      Lesson here is when someone enters your home shoot first and often.

      1. I’m sure the police hit squad would take his initial innocence into consideration when paying a follow up visit.

      2. Lesson here is when someone enters your home shoot first and often.

        Keep the dog(s) between the curb and the porch. Make them answer the dog(s) first.

        1. Yeah, watching people kill your pets is a good way to de-escalate things.

          1. Yeah, watching people kill your pets is a good way to de-escalate things.

            I’m curious where you think things should de-escalate to after someone shoots your dog in your yard. The idea is that any establishing of intent and/or de-escalation occurs in the front yard rather than in the house. I’m not entirely sure you and I value pets, family, or both the same way.

  8. midnight no knock raids are far more dangerous than approaching in the middle of the day but hey how else are they going to get over time and opportunities to play with their equipment

    1. These euphemisms are…not very euphemistic?

  9. I guess Lopez didn’t have a puppy for them to shoot.

    1. If he’d had a dog I’m sure it would have been to first to go down, then maybe we’d just be talking about another cop vs. dog story, and that the dog was an immediate and viable threat and all.

      1. If he’d had a dog I’m sure it would have been to first to go down

        That’s the idea. This is why I wept at the end of Old Yeller and laughed, hard, at the end of The Fallen.

        1. Sorry, laughed at the end of The Departed.

    2. According to the WaPo article officers also shot at a “pit bull” that ran out of the house at some point. No word on whether they hit the dog.

      1. According to the WaPo article officers also shot at a “pit bull” that ran out of the house at some point. No word on whether they hit the dog.

        So they shot at the dog and he answered the door, gun in hand, and they still got the drop on him? Or did they shoot a man dead in his home and *then* proceed to attempt to murder his dog?

        Fuck.

  10. Police officers do deserve some privacy protections, as all citizens do

    Um…

    Does the arrested and presumed innocent arrestee ever get privacy?

    These fuckers work for me. In their capacity as a cop, they have no rights, only powers granted them by the citizenry. I fuck up and the whole world knows about it. The government fucks up and they have rights? Seems a little backwards to me.

    1. arrested and presumed innocent arrestee

  11. The cops should have to answer for armed home invasion and murder.

    Dragging them back to the house, forcing them to kneel in the middle of the street, administering 300 grains of Trepanizine, then processing the corpses through a woodchipper would be a fine start. Time to make a stand against terrorists wearing badges.

    1. Sounds like a fine start to me.

    2. The reason this happened is because of America’s gun culture. Had Lopez not been armed, he’d still be alive.

      1. If the officers hadn’t been armed he’d still be alive. That’s the level of disarmament I’m looking for – not even the police carry guns. Something tells me the police will be a whole lot more willing to deescalate situations if they’re not packing.

  12. The only thing that matters is the heros made it home safely after their shift.
    The ONLY thing that matters.

    1. Well, there is the sweet, sweet overtime that union brothers and sisters will rack up “investigating” this unfortunate, but reasonable, death of a civilian.

  13. A warrant is good for a specific address.

    If I knock down the door on someone else’s house it is a B&E. If I kill the occupant, it’s murder.

    So if the cops do that at an address not on the warrant, they are felons, “mistake” or not.

    If you kill the occupant of the wrong house, it is felony murder, not ‘self defense’.

    1. You don’t get to claim self defense. You had no legal right to be there.

      1. You don’t got a steenken badge, do you?

        1. Exactly.

          I have to follow the law. I’m not part of the Warrior Caste.

    2. Look, these heroes made a split second decision that they were at the perp’s trailer. You want to put our heroes in extreme danger by second guessing them!

      1. I want these rampant murderers prosecuted, convicted, and executed in a speedy fashion. If possible, by the legal system, if not, by vigilantes.

    3. If you kill the occupant of the wrong house, it is felony murder, not ‘self defense’.

      Well, probably more along the lines of manslaughter, but point taken.

      1. Well, probably more along the lines of manslaughter, but point taken.

        Depends on intent at the first house. If I, as a citizen, intend to take someone from 123 Main St. by force and accidentally kill someone at 124 Main, it’s a pretty clear cut case of felony murder. If was just popping by 123 Main for a friendly chat, that’s a different story. One that would be heavily scrutinized if I showed up for a friendly chat wearing bullet resistant clothing and armed to the teeth.

        1. man?slaugh?ter
          ?man?sl?d?r
          noun
          the crime of killing a human being without malice aforethought, or otherwise in circumstances not amounting to murder.

          There was no intent to kill (at least that’s provable), at either address. I don’t approve of DAs overcharging people to get them to cop a plea. I’ll be consistent when people I dislike commit egregious acts.

          I would equate it with a drunken driver killing someone. The death was caused by gross negligence.

          1. felony murder doctrine
            n. a rule of criminal statutes that any death which occurs during the commission of a felony is first degree murder, and all participants in that felony or attempted felony can be charged with and found guilty of murder. A typical example is a robbery involving more than one criminal, in which one of them shoots, beats to death or runs over a store clerk, killing the clerk. Even if the death were accidental, all of the participants can be found guilty of felony murder, including those who did no harm, had no gun, and/or did not intend to hurt anyone. In a bizarre situation, if one of the holdup men or women is killed, his/her fellow robbers can be charged with murder.
            http://dictionary.law.com/Defa…..lected=741

            1. a. It wasn’t in the commission of a felony

              b. FMD is a bullshit law

          2. Funny thing is, I’d bet we all agree that even a manslaughter charge would be a step in the right direction.

            When they get criminal charges for this shit, they’ll learn to read a map in no time.

            1. regardless of mens rea, they are still guilty of a crime.

          3. The rule of felony murder is a legal doctrine in some common law jurisdictions that broadens the crime of murder: when an offender kills (regardless of intent to kill) in the commission of a dangerous or enumerated crime (called a felony in some jurisdictions), he/she is guilty of murder.

            I didn’t mean to say it’s de facto not possibly manslaughter/always felony murder. Just that there is, conceivably, a case for felony murder.

            It sounds like they shot at the dog and, in other cases, the police have shot dogs and people while executing search warrants. If the warrant was to search the house for drugs and the officer went in guns blazing, there’s plenty of evidence for felony murder.

            I don’t know the reason for the warrant in the first place. I understand it was an arrest warrant, but if the guy was wanted for tax evasion or failure to pay child support with no other history, there’s a reasonable question of why (apparently) the guns were out before the door was opened.

            You’d better believe that if the guy (Lopez) was wanted and accidentally shot the cop, the DA would be leaning on felony murder, whether you approve or not.

            1. Not germaine to your point, but felony murder is sometimes broader than that. If a death occurs at all it can be invoked. There was a recent case where individuals broke into a house. The homeowner killed one of the intruders in self defense. The other intruders were charged with felony murder.

    4. A logical and legally sound argument. But it carries no weight in an illogical, unjust society. Try using an emotional or superstitious criticism of the murder.

      The U.S.S.A. (United Socialist States of American) is infested with a majority of political zombies who chant MSM slogans as their mantra, e.g., “if it makes us safer”, “if it’s for the children (especially the unborn)”, “it’s national security”, “he was in fear for his life”. These are not arguments, but they are all you will get in this society.

      My point: Identify the reality of the society we live in, no matter how horrible, how insane, and you have a better chance of surviving in it. Or, you could run for your life, except the sickness, the superstition called govt. is everywhere.

  14. So, did they ‘forget’ to turn on their body cameras again?

    1. According to a Carrion Ledger article I found, the officers in Southaven do not have body cameras at all.

  15. Never let the police officer kill you, they won’t be punished for it, and they know it.

    If you fear for your life, eliminate the threat. Let the jury sort it out. ‘Nuff said.

  16. Just like anyone accused of cold-blooded murder, the officer is in a cell while we’re figuring out what happened, right?

  17. I know I’m preaching to the choir and this has been said but why the fuck do they go full Gestapo over an arrest warrant for assault? Some guy gets in a fight in the Wal mart parking lot after a guy cuts him off and he has gets to look forward to ten guys rushing his house at midnight? They can’t knock on his door at noon with a bad ass looking guy standing there with hand on holster?

    Aside from this tragedy at the wrong house, why the hell would this be a reasonable show of force for anyone other than a killer on the run or serial killer?

    1. Aside from this tragedy at the wrong house, why the hell would this be a reasonable show of force for anyone other than a killer on the run or serial killer?

      Even for the serial killers and otherwise considerable threats, you don’t wait for them to open the door, gun in hand. See Whitey Bulger.

    2. See how REASON distorts things?
      There were only two officers. They weren’t serving a warrant, but were responding to reports of a domestic assault in the area.”…it’s very possible that the officers were at the wrong address.” said the District Attorney.
      The wife of the guy says they awoke to the dogs barking and saw a police car outside. The man opened the door and their dogs ran out. Then the cops said the guy had a gun that he refused to drop when told to.
      In the front yard was a sign that said “Beware of the Dogs” and another that said “Never mind the dog, beware of the owner.”

  18. A police officer shot Lopez after he allegedly refused to put down the gun he was holding when he answered the door.

    I’d wager he was not presented a chance to put down the gun and that this incident occurred at night. Because how dare someone have a gun when armed thugs are beating on your door.

    Three bullets went into that door and the door was shut when those bullets went into the door.

    Police do not practice BASIC firearms safety like not shooting at what you cannot see.

    1. You shouldn’t always believe what the attorney representing the family says – or what Reason puts out there, either.

  19. I’ll bet the police union is looking right now through the victim’s past, Facebook, etc, to come up with something, anything, to smear him with.

  20. Police Serve Warrant to Wrong Address, Fatally Shoot Man Who Lives There

    I feel like I’ve seen this movie before…

  21. I am 70 years old and there have always been bad cops. Because of police unions they are nothing more than gangs. If it has members that rape, rob and kill and others officers look the other way then what is the difference between them and MS13 or any other gang. Really not sure about big cities, but rural city police departments across America are made up of school bullies and dumb jocks. I suspect the dumb jock is a large part of the big city police also.

    1. I grew up in a rural area. A friend went to police academy and his first job was to a nearby town. The cops were corrupt beyond belief, and they tried to trick him into illegal activities they could use to as leverage to keep him quiet about all the corruption. He quit in less than a week and went to the neighboring town. It was night and day, and the new police chief said he got most of his recruits from those who left the other town in disgust.

      Nothing anyone could do about it, because the next higher authority was the County Sheriff who was one of the biggest drug dealers in the state.

  22. If you feel you have to answer the door with a gun in your hand, then –

    DON’T ANSWER THE DOOR. Retreat to a safe space, and wait, or call 911 (and then be very careful).

    Discretion is almost always the better part of valor.

  23. Wasn’t this the opening bit in the movie Brazil? Has reality turned into a Terry Gilliam dystopia?

  24. I live in the city in which this happened. As you can guess, it’s been huge news around here. Here are some things that I do not believe were mentioned in the article or comments, but if they were, forgive me:

    The family has lawyered-up, and the only information coming out is pretty much coming from them. The city is not putting out any information right now.

    The lawyer’s office sent someone down to Jackson to examine the body and they are reporting that Lopez died from a single shot to the BACK of his head.

    They are also claiming that only two guns were in the house. Neither of them were close to Lopez’s body. A rifle was tucked behind the couch and a handgun was in the bedroom.

    The dog was inside the house the entire time (according to Lopez’s widow). The officer reported shooting at it, but did not kill it.

    Lopez’s address was prominently displayed on his mailbox. The mailboxes for the correct address (a duplex) were next to Lopez’s. Both doors of the duplex had the correct address number displayed above the doors. The correct address also had a huge decorative “P” above the door. The real suspect’s last name starts with P.

    The warrant in question was not issued until AFTER the shooting. The police stated they were going to perform a “warrantless” arrest since the incident occurred within 24 hours. However, that same night, the police did question the correct suspect and did NOT arrest him. Once the warrant was issued, they went back and got him.

    1. God damn that is horrific

      1. Horrific and just the tip of the iceberg. But it must be put in context. This reign of terror is the product of a dangerous superstitious faith in monopoly authority held by the majority worldwide, as expressed by the institutionalization of violence. When people forfeit their sovereignty by granting an elite authority over themselves they act irrationally. When they force their irrationality on those who chose to remain sovereign, they act immorally, anti-social.

        But this the world we live in, where the morally blind inflict their violence (govt.) on all, doing so with ignorant arrogance, and claiming it’s for the “common good”. No myth could be less true or more fatal.

  25. If I owned a business in Southaven I’d at least be tempted to put up a sign:
    “As a precaution, until SPD releases the names of Ismael Lopez’s murderers, none of its officers are welcome here”

  26. It is not uncommon for police to raid the wrong address. Often the officers are told it is te [for example] yellow house on the corner. But the house is yellow only in daylight. At night the white painyed house looks yellow under the amber street lights.
    House numbers are often hard tom see or even non-existent.
    Honest people citizens don’t expect the police, they expect a home invasion burglary.
    Drug dealers and criminals do expect the police and are more likely to comply.
    Home invaders do shout “police” to gain entrance.
    Police warrant raids procedure need to be updated. A telephone call, a polite knock on te door during daylight saves police and innocent civilians lives.

    1. Police warrant raids procedure need to be updated. A telephone call, a polite knock on te door during daylight saves police and innocent civilians lives.

      Yeah, the overwhelming majority of these cases would be prevented by a daylight drive-by by someone involved in the subsequent raid. Let alone an hour’s worth of recon or, you know, actual fucking detective work.

      Police are consistently decrying the flushing of drugs down the toilet, but as anyone who’s worked with plumbing and/or sewage lines can attest, it’s pretty dead simple to turn off a water line or otherwise prevent drugs from being flushed, let alone retrieved after being flushed.

      They’re not really interested in saving lives or, at least, not really incentivized to.

      1. So, they turn off the water – and all that happens is that the tank doesn’t refill after the flush goes down.
        Maybe you need to try working on plumbing and/or sewage lines to be able to attest to anything.
        Not too many homes have Flushometer valves.

        1. Maybe you need to try working on plumbing and/or sewage lines to be able to attest to anything.
          Not too many homes have Flushometer valves.

          I’m going to give you the benefit of the doubt and just assume you haven’t had your coffee. Otherwise, if you’re engaged in any sort of criminal enterprise, I recommend you stop now, you aren’t smart enough to avoid the police and, if you have competition, you certainly aren’t smart enough to outwit them.

          I’m talking about shutting it off at the buffalo or b box which is on public property. With a trivial amount of police work, you can know when the occupants of a house get up ‘in the morning’. With zero police work, you can guess what the first thing they do is. Additionally, presuming the goal is to save lives, this would only be an issue when we’re raiding houses with distribution amounts of drugs which presumably require multiple flushes. I’d love to believe that all the cases where a dime bag got flushed were hard core drug users and worth Mr. Lopez’s life over but, I’m fairly certain of the fact a good percentage of the time there weren’t even any exogenous drugs to begin with.

        2. I’ve routed city lines and stood in open septic systems. I’ve pulled month-old remnants from lines. Hell, pretty much any city worker will tell you that those flushable wipes aren’t flushable and the workers at the treatment plant can routinely measure the trace amounts of drugs in the inflow (I’ve done so myself with pesticides). I wouldn’t wish particular aspects of those jobs on anyone but then, for most people, I’d be less willing to wish two in the chest on them.

          In any event, *if* they were really worried about drugs being flushed rather than just kicking in doors and shooting (pets, people, whatever), they’d (well, first, make sure they had the right address) render the toilets inoperable. Repeated evidence strongly suggests that instead, they’re more interested in kicking in doors and shooting. I mean, if I had illegal property to get rid of I wouldn’t use a toilet and, if I were forced to, I’d use a public toilet anyway.

  27. if the coppers were to be required to maintain as high a degree of accuracy as WE their victim/public are expected to maintain, such things would be far more rare than they are. Seems these coppers don’t bother to double check addresses, or the residence address of record for their target. I’d like to seee some explaination as to HOW the “wrong house” was raided. Yeah, I “get” the need for surprise…. though it does seem, in most similar cases, that the surprise works to the detriment of justice. Here the surprise meant the surprise death of an innocent man.

    How about having one officer, in good body protection, calmly approach and knock up the door… with half a dozen in concealment/cover as backup. If the guy answers the door with a gun, fine… calmly explain the reason for the visit. If the guy opens fire (almost never happens… if he would, he’d have been watching and opened fire long before the coppers reach the porch) then return…..

    but this “wrong house” nonsense MUST STOP. It is inexcusable.
    If I hand the copper the wrong registration for my car, will he be quick to “give me a pass”, blow it off, and carry on as though nothing had happened? Not in MY experience….. or that of anyone else I know.

    1. The city’s current narrative seems to be a “confusing mailbox” situation. Also, the numbering doesn’t follow standard rules. Both addresses ended in an odd number but were on opposite sides of the street.

      However, a simple search on google maps shows the correct address. Street View shows what the house looks like. Suspect was supposed to be in a duplex, which should have been indicated by an “A” or “B” after the address they were given. Lopez lived in a trailer.

      I’ve reached out to the mayor on FB and actually had a dialogue with him about the necessity of the city obtaining body cameras. Right now I’m getting the usual response… concerns over costs of data storage and privacy concerns. Body camera would have shed light on this.

  28. At least we know these officers will receive additional training.
    I mean, we wouldn’t want them to get the wrong venue address for their upcoming valor commendation ceremonies.

  29. I have a dream. I dream that some day, an officer who says “I was in fear of my life” gets told “you have need to be. You are clearly guilty of murder, and we have the death penalty in this state.”

    1. Awesome

  30. The lesson to be learnt here is that the next Lopez had better shoot first. We’ve seen what happens when he doesn’t.

  31. A long time ago, I made the determination that the chances of a gun helping me is outweighed by the chances of it hurting me. This adds to the odds.

  32. Cops cannot be trusted. Cops lie all the time and everywhere. They lie for no reason other than that they can get away with it. They lie, lie, lie, and lie again. They lie on their arrest reports, they lie in court, they lie to get a brother cop out of a jam. They lie with abandon. They lie with aplomb. They lie with sincerity. It’s the first lesson in police academy: “How to lie sincerely.” This is the reason you never, never trust a cop. Every word out of their mouths is a lie. And if they don’t like being called a bunch of scum-bag liars, let’s see them call out their fellows when they know they’re lying.

    That will never happen. Why? Because cops have NO integrity, NO honor, NO ethics, NO morals. Well, Perhaps they do have a bit of honor, that which is referred to as “honor among thieves”.
    After all, even the disreputable and unethical adhere to certain moral codes among themselves.
    Cops also have their code: 1) Never tell the truth about a fellow cop. 2) Take your cut and keep your mouth shut.

    1. Sounds like you have the police confused with lawyers.
      Now, there’s a group that lie all the time.
      Cops get into big trouble if the lie and the evidence proves they have. They aren’t immune to perjury charges. They get fired all the time for presenting false testimony, reports or corrupting/misreporting evidence.
      You don’t know what you are talking about.

  33. “The “good/bad cop” question can be disposed of decisively. We need only consider the following:

    i. Every cop has agreed, as part of his job, to enforce laws; all of them.

    ii. Many of the laws are manifestly unjust, or even cruel and wicked.

    iii. Therefore, every cop has agreed to act as an enforcer of laws that are manifestly unjust, or even cruel and wicked.

    There are no good cops.”

    ?- Dr. Robert Higgs

    1. Stated by a self-described libertarian anarchist.
      You bolster the argument of those opposed to libertarianism.
      Sane people realize, if we are to have laws, there must be people to enforce them and they are not in a position to be able to say whether those laws are to be enforced – that is for the people you elect.
      If we aren’t to have laws, then you advocate anarchy.
      Good luck with that.

      1. “Sane people realize…” that if I take a job were I am informed I must not use my conscience, e.g., I must obey dept. policy, one such policy being: Never testify against or expose a fellow officer, then I can agree or refuse the job. I can not later claim “I was just following orders and had no choice” because I did chose, at the beginning.

        As for law, it is an artificial social constraint, often illogical, unclear and open to interpretation, sometimes contradictory, sometimes immoral, but always enforced for the benefit of the enforcers, not the people who lie to themselves that it is for their social stability.

        The myth that violence is stabilizing protection is a worldwide superstition that is killing humanity every second and may result in our extinction.

        Only reason as expressed in a voluntary society can bring about social stability.

  34. It should go without saying that the above statement is not an indictment of all police officers . . .

    Why?

    Because, from my point of view, police are simply people willing to enforce the diktats of the powerful – no matter what those diktats may be. That they occasionally ‘protect and serve’ doesn’t change the base fact that they’re there to enforce compliance with the whims of the politically connected.

    They’re enforcers *first*, protectors second.

    That, by itself, is an indictment of *all police officers*.

  35. I’d disagree that all cops are bad, but I would agree that all cops are potentially bad if they aren’t punished for mistakes, especially ones that result in injury or death. If there are no consequences for mistakenly serving a warrant at the wrong address and then shooting the justifiably armed innocent resident, then what’s going to motivate cops to make damn sure they’re at the right address, that they aren’t overreacting to or escalating a situation or using a little restraint and even common sense? Not much. They ought to be held to the same standards, hell, even higher standards, than civilians. I accidentally blow away some Girl Scouts selling cookies because I feared for my life and I doubt I walk scot free.

    1. But get your facts straight.
      They weren’t serving a warrant. They were investigating reports of a domestic assault, which are notoriously inaccurate when it comes to locations. So, while this might not have been the place reported, the officers didn’t know that – they didn’t make an error of commission. They honestly thought they were at the right location.
      There were only two officers and the residents, by the wife’s own reporting, knew they were the police when they opened the door and let the dogs out.

  36. Is this what Trump meant by saying the police should be a little rougher on suspects? I guess we will never learn or be at a point where the police should belong to the public or community they serve and not the other way around. Immunity for the police when poor decisions are made should never be acceptable. Obviously the Southhaven police department and their government don’t want to accept responsibility for their actions when mistakes are made. Perhaps their training videos come from the Middle East, or Venezuela, or North Korea, or the White House.

  37. funny that the anti-gun crowd pushes so hard for disarming of civilians, but never disarming of police

    1. The anti-gun argue from emotion, not reason. As such they defend their fears with one irrationality after another. They do so dishonestly, e.g., denying the contradiction of taking guns from everyone except the authorities.

  38. The shooting will be ruled justified. A settlement will be paid to the family. The police will claim they will try to do better next time.

  39. “and no Warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by Oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized.”

  40. I’ll bet the police union is looking right now through the victim’s past, Facebook, etc, to come up with something, anything, to smear him with.

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