Donald Trump

Trump Reversing Record Number of Regulations

President signs four more Congressional Review Act rollbacks, bringing total number to seven…or six more than all his predecessors combined

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Warren G and Nate Dogg obviously ahead of their time. ||| GW Regulatory Center
GW Regulatory Center

President Donald Trump's big moves today on energy/climate policy, assessed in detail by Science Correspondent Ronald Bailey below, are far from his only deregulatory heaves this week. On Monday, for example, the president signed into law four regulatory rollbacks presented to him via the Congressional Review Act (CRA), or three more than were enacted between 1996-2016 combined.

The previously obscure CRA, which Scott Shackford wrote about at length in January 2015, gives Congress 60 working days to reverse any new regulation added to the Federal Register. (That's congressional working days, so in fact the 115th Congress has had the ability to pick off any unwanted Obama-administration reg enacted after mid-June of last year.) The only successful deployment of the CRA prior to Trump came in March 2001, when President George W. Bush signed out of existence a controversial November 2000 Clinton administration rule requiring employers to prevent ergonomic injuries in the workplace. The unified Republican Congress of 2015–2016 presented five CRA rollbacks to President Barack Obama, and he vetoed each one.

President Trump now has seven CRA notches on his belt, and more coming his way. The latest, as summarized by USA Today:

* The "Fair Pay and Safe Workplaces" rule, which barred companies from receiving federal contracts if they had a history of violating wage, labor or workplace safety laws. That regulation, derided by critics as the "blacklisting" rule, was already held up in court. […]

* A Bureau of Land Management rule known as "Planning 2.0," that gave the federal government a bigger role in land use decisions. The rule was opposed by the energy industry.

* Two regulations on measuring school performance and teacher training under the Every Student Succeeds Act, a law Obama signed in 2015 with bipartisan support.

The other three CRA reversals so far have been a Security and Exchange Commission rule requiring publicly traded resource-extraction companies to disclose payments made to foreign governments, a Department of Interior framework governing stream runoff of coal mining operations, and a Social Security Administration policy (covered by Scott Shackford here) to share the names of people it classifies as having a mental illness with the federal gun database in order to deny them access to weapons.

Other Trump deregulatory activity has included:

* His January 30 executive order requiring agencies to identify two existing regulations to kill each time they promulgate a new one.

* His February 24 executive order instructing each agency to appoint a Regulatory Reform Officer, who will head up a task force that suggests regulations to euthanize.

Speaking of late entertainers…. ||| Quickmeme
Quickmeme

* His appointment to the Supreme Court of Neil Gorsuch, a judge most famous for his criticism of excessive deference to regulators.

* His appointments to the Cabinet critics of and reformers to the departments they now head, including Education's Betsy DeVos, Energy's Rick Perry, Transportation's Elaine Chao, and Health and Human Service's Tom Price.

* His nomination of drug-approval-process critic Scott Gottlieb to head up the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), and his three paragraphs in the State of the Union Address talking up FDA reform.

* His appointment to head up the Federal Communications Commission regulation skeptic Ajit Pai.

There is no doubt that the early Trump presidency has made deregulation a priority. It remains to be seen how much Congress will share that appetite, and how much the administration's efforts will be constrained or counterbalanced by Trump's own meddlesome proclivities into other areas of individual and corporate behavior.

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42 responses to “Trump Reversing Record Number of Regulations

  1. All pissy little regulations.

    1. That’s not what I’m hearing in the media.

    2. lol

    3. So? Pissy little regulations need to be eradicated too. Maybe more.

  2. It remains to be seen how much Congress will share that appetite…

    Without an expansive Executive Branch bureaucracy, running our day-to-day lives falls to Congress. They can’t possibly be on board with that.

  3. Ha! I actually saw somebody making the argument that the CRA was an end-run around Chevron with the implication that Congress is illegitimately interfering with the executive-branch agencies authority to make laws, as interpreted by SCOTUS, which makes it the Supreme Law of the Land. Congress’ authority to even create the executive-branch agencies and delegate their legislative authority to them was a highly dubious proposition if you ask me, but to claim that the executive-branch agencies’ authority is higher than Congress’ authority? You’re on drugs.

    1. Stupid’s a hell of a drug.

    2. It would be unconstitutional if it weren’t for the fact that its products are acts of Congress. Some characteriz’ns of the CRA don’t make that clear. The CRA just enforces a procedural rule on Congress making it easier for them to get out such legisl’n. They’re still bills.

  4. So,the comments working now? I see the comment count has been down.

  5. a Department of Interior framework governing stream runoff of coal mining operations

    You’d think landowners downstream from coal mines would have the right to not get toxic waste dumped on their property without permission, but apparently that’s crazy commie talk.

    1. Summon coase!

    2. You’d think that people living downstream from EPA worksites would have the right to not get toxic waste spilled on their property without permission, but apparently that’s crazy anti-government talk.

      Yeah, the EPA was supposed to be remediating the toxic waste from earlier mining but they certainly made the situation worse, not better.

      As for the people downstream, they do have a right to sue if someone dumps toxic waste on their property.

      The Navajo nation has sued the EPA. People are suing the TVA for their coal ash spill. There are also a number of on-going lawsuits against the government for their failure to enforce environmental laws. And there are several lawsuits pending against actual coal mines.

    3. Well since coal mining wasn’t invented in 2016, nor was it unregulated up until that time, I think a little more analysis is needed to predict the actual impact of having or not having a particular coal mining regulation that was passed last year.

  6. There is no doubt that the early Trump presidency has made deregulation a priority.

    LIBERTARIAN MOMENT

    1. Looks longer than just a moment from here. This is going to last a while.

      1. 4 million votes last a good while when they cover the gap in eleven states.

  7. There is no doubt that the early Trump presidency has made deregulation a priority.

    LIBERTARIAN MOMENT

  8. You had me at ‘overturning Obama’.

  9. Q: Why did Bailey stop manscaping?

    A: He found out Mrs. Bailey does not believe in Shaved Ron Deference.

    1. I can’t believe I’m the first to golf-clap.

      1. have time to golf clap but no time to fix broken ass comment system? Come on, Matt. PRIORITIES! Your indentured servants are getting uppity.

  10. Hey, as long as Trump allows oil companies to just spew their shit everywhere without some regulator raising a finger every couple of years I’d say that’s progress. Cutting the EPA’s budget by 2.6 billion and then raising the DOD’s budget by 60 billion is just more libertarian winning. And we’ve won sooo much, lately.

    1. Is there some reason you continue to use a handle to look like mine? I’d thought you’d stopped that and moved on to one of the other ones.

  11. But but but the world’th coming to and end and global warmin’th going to kill uth

  12. can he:

    1. get rid of the shitty non-vented gas cans?
    2. get rid of ethanol or at least let you guy gas without ethanol other than avgas?

    1. He was pro-ethanol on the campaign trail, so the main hope for the anti-ethanol people around him is that the previous mandate will fall apart on its own, due to not hitting targets or something.

    2. I consider the shitty non-vented gas cans to be a form of market protection for the makers of brass fittings.

  13. Even a blind squirrel…..

    1. I don’t think that metaphor works. Trump doesn’t seem to be doing things blindly. We may not agree with his priorities, but he isn’t just flailing about.

  14. What I got from this was that Congress worked 60 days in the last 6 months, for which they were compensated roughly $125k (just kinda guessing since I last looked maybe 5 years ago at actual pay rates).

    Which means we pay these motherfuckers way too much to make our lives hell.

    1. my bad, 9 months. 60 days in 9 months.

      Worst part? I wish they worked less.

      1. Read PARLIAMENT OF WHORES. Congresscritters work almost constantly. They may only meet in Congressional session a few days a month, but the out of session workload is heavy.

        Now, WHAT they work on IS often a problem.

  15. bringing total number to seven?or six more than all his predecessors combined

    What a high bar. He should be revoking in job lots.

    1. Probably not too practical. Each reg is a bit of agency turf, and the agency in question will fight bitterly for it.

      Get the Washington establishment accustomed to the idea, and it may pick up speed.

  16. And THIS is the kind of shit I was hoping might ACTUALLY happen after I found out he won. I didn’t vote for him, but crossed my fingers he would follow through on this part of his campaign rhetoric. If he really keeps going shit canning tons of useless regulations and rejiggers the tax code like he’s talking about all the other mess of him being president will have been worth it. Plus the liberal tears. Those are pretty awesome too. Haha.

    According to his previous talk he’s planning on total slash and burn, and the way he has started out is not bad, so I’m just gonna keep my fingers crossed.

  17. And THIS is the kind of shit I was hoping might ACTUALLY happen after I found out he won. I didn’t vote for him, but crossed my fingers he would follow through on this part of his campaign rhetoric. If he really keeps going shit canning tons of useless regulations and rejiggers the tax code like he’s talking about all the other mess of him being president will have been worth it. Plus the liberal tears. Those are pretty awesome too. Haha.

    According to his previous talk he’s planning on total slash and burn, and the way he has started out is not bad, so I’m just gonna keep my fingers crossed.

  18. “Sure, he is the antithesis of everything we believe in every other area…but he’s cutting a few regulations! So worth it!”

    1. Shrillary was/is ALSO the antithisis of everything we believe, and she wouldn’t have done this, so we are,coming out ahead.

      A little.

  19. None of this really has much to do with the current Republican Prohibitionist Figurehead. The LP 328% increase in votecount has every pious looter prohibitionist pawing through the LP platform for additional issues to take off the chessboard. These same considerations led to the legalization of gay rights–something only the LP has had the guts to defend for decades. Declines in aggregate religiosity track declines in perceived Congressional infallibility, and both figures spur Organized Mysticism to seek a firmer purchase on the reins of government and its sinecures by all possible means–even at the cost of greater freedom! The article inadvertently shows 4 million Libertarian spoiler votes in action repealing bad laws. Not one of those vote was wasted.

  20. just as Gerald implied I am in shock that a person able to earn $7711 in 1 month on the computer . go now>>>>>>>>>>> https://qr.net/eyGRuC

  21. The Department of Defense has more regulations than just about everybody else. The soldiers are doubtless looking forward to not having as many of those pesky things around to muddy the waters and screw everything up. Once they are no longer forced to obey their officers and NCOs market forces will be able to take over. They’ll be free to sign on with whichever (military) company or battalion offers them the most money and the best booty. (That’s “booty”, not “bootie”, although I’m sure they’ll get some of the other as well once Trump kicks all those namby-pamby equal opportunity regs to the nearest exit.)

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