Donald Trump

Law Enforcement Leaders Release Agenda Calling for Trump Administration to End 'Unnecessary Incarceration'

Current and former prosecutors and police chiefs say "today's crime policies...are simply ineffective in preserving public safety."

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Screaming into a void
Natan Dvir/Polaris/Newscom

Law Enforcement Leaders To Reduce Crime & Incarceration—a group of over 175 distinguished current and former law enforcement officials—has released a 28-page "agenda" which includes five major policy recommendations for the Trump administration:

  • Prioritize Resources to Combat Violent Crime
  • Support Reducing Unnecessary Incarceration and Federal Sentencing Reform
  • Increase Mental Health and Drug Treatment
  • Bolster Community Policing
  • Preserve and Expand Recidivism Reduction

The document's focus on reducing crime through more efficient federal assistance to local law enforcement agencies, and also through efforts to reduce the prison population, are in direct contrast with President Trump's recent executive orders—which included volatile law and order rhetoric and an insistence against all available facts that the United States is engulfed in a violent crime wave. The report is also in direct contrast to the stated interests of police unions such as the Fraternal Order of Police (FOP)—which endorsed Trump's candidacy and support his call for more punitive sentencing requirements.

Noting the $5.5 billion in federal grants given to local law enforcement agencies by the Department of Justice (DOJ) in 2016, the report's authors write, "to a large degree, these outlays are not targeted at fighting violent and serious crime. In fact, some of these dollars are expended on antiquated law enforcement tools, such as dragnet enforcement of lower-level offenses. This misses an opportunity to prioritize resources towards more effective ways of fighting violent and serious crime in the states. Without such change, states will continue inefficient enforcement techniques."

Insisting that "Bloated prison populations harm more than they protect," the authors rebuke Attorney General Jeff Sessions for opposing (as a U.S. senator) the Sentencing Reform and Corrections Act of 2015 (SRCA), which they supported on the basis that "Reducing unnecessary incarceration will free funding and time for our officers to focus on targeting and preventing violent crime, making our streets safer."

With regards to imprisoning addicts or the mentally ill, the authors write, "Individuals with mental illness cost taxpayers significantly more to incarcerate than other inmates for a variety of reasons, including a higher likelihood of violating prison rules, high medical examination costs, and increased staffing needs." They add, "As a result, when these people are released they are, at best, no better off than then they went in — and often worse. They are practically destined to commit more crimes and cycle into prison."

The authors argue that to reduce recidivism rates in the name of public safety, "prisons must start preparing inmates for release from the first day they are behind bars to the last. This includes effective support for ex-offenders once they re-enter society." They also call for bringing back Clinton administration-era levels of funding for the Justice Department's Office of Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS), which once had an annual budget of $1 billion in grants to aid local agencies in community policing, but which now as about a $200 million annual allocation.

The report is co-authored by former Dallas Police Chief David Brown and former New Orleans police superindentet Ronal Serpas, and some of the group's more notable members include New York City District Attorney Cyrus Vance, Los Angeles Police Chief Charlie Beck, former Virginia Attorney General Mark Earley, and former New York and Los Angeles Police Commissioner William J. Bratton.

Read the whole document, titled "Fighting Crime and Strengthening Criminal Justice: An Agenda for the New Administration" here.

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  1. I’m sure he’ll get Sessions right on that while enlisting Giuliani to run point with the media.

    1. Sessions: Boss, when can I get them potheads?, they’re not good people!

      Trump: Calm down Tattoo, don’t you still have some Mexicans to deport?

      Sessions: Wait, I’m not Tattoo, I’m Attorney General Sessions! Remember, you just appointed me?

      Trump: Oh yeah, well you sort of look like that Tattoo from Fantasy Island, in a garden gnome sort of way.

      Sessions: But those potheads ARE the biggest threat to our freedom, sir.

      Trump: Grab my golf clubs, Tattoo, I gotta get out of here for a while! I’m the greatest golfer president ever, my game is yuuuuge, you’re going to be really impressed Tattoo, we’re making golf great again.

    2. Meanwhile, Black Lives Matter will double down on its insanity to discredit any opposition from libertarians.

      See Black Lives Matter co-founder appears to label white people ‘defects’

      From the Toronto Star’s quote taken from Yusra Khogali’s Facebook page: “Whiteness is not humxness, infact, white skin is sub-humxn.” [sic]

    3. “This misses an opportunity to prioritize resources towards more effective ways of fighting violent and serious crime in the states. ”

      End Prohibition you fools. It is as if we learned nothing from Alcohol Prohibition.

  2. I don’t see ‘end the drug war’ on that list.

    Also: Increase Mental Health and Drug Treatment.

    Oh, I see, now you can harass and arrest people and then send them to drug treatment against their will instead of jail. I somehow think this will worsen the situation. But some drug treatment center cronies are going to get filthy rich.

    1. Well they wouldn’t want to increase the unemployment figures.

    2. some drug treatment center cronies are going to get filthy rich.

      And isn’t that what’s really important? Why do hate drug treatment center cronies?

      Let’s Make Cronyism Great Again!

    3. *slides plans to open a rehab center under table*

  3. New York City District Attorney Cyrus Vance

    Any relation to Cyrus Vance of the Carter administration?

  4. These recommendations sound pretty good and the country would be better off had they been implemented decades ago.

    So why did this LEO brain trust wait until now to arse themselves to publish their ideas?

    1. Because the Obama administrations hated cops and assumed that all problems were racial in origin so there was no need to provide him with other means while Trump has been open to what the police have to say.

      1. Unmitigated bullshit. The police reform movement long predates BLM, and was never about race at all until BLM came on the scene. And the Obama administration predates BLM as well. So, no.

  5. This is all well and good, but it distracts us from what we all come to H&R to see. Namely, Asian women in owl glasses.

    1. FAKE NEWS! She’s not Asian!

      1. She identifies as Asian, you ethno-normative, cis-gendered shitlord.

      2. That first one is a man baby. No chick has eyebrows like that.

        1. Don’t ruin this for me, John. She is a she until she pulls her Wang out.

        2. lol, do you seriously not know that all the women you’ve been with probably pluck their eyebrows? Yeah, women do sometimes have eyebrows like that.

    2. Me love long time. More please.

  6. This will work, just like when all those law enforcement leaders called for an end to marijuana prohibition.

  7. How about we just end those federal grants and let the States and locals implement their ideas. Without those grants, I don’t see how any of these are federal issues.

  8. I wonder if there is a connection between federal grants and asset forfeiture.

  9. Preserve and Expand Recidivism Reduction

    If we could stop people from re-offending, we wouldn’t have much of a crime problem. Sadly, it is not so simple to do that. That whole human agency thing and all.

    And I would find this more convincing if they had bothered to mention the need to have fewer laws. The best and quickest way to lower “crime” is to have fewer laws for people to break. Make things that are crimes now into lawful behavior.

    1. ^this
      problem though is the whole ‘when you are a hammer everything looks like a nail’ perspective.

    2. Ferris. “We want them to be broken. You’d better get it straight that it’s not a bunch of boy scouts you’re up against… We’re after power and we mean it… There’s no way to rule innocent men. The only power any government has is the power to crack down on criminals. Well, when there aren’t enough criminals one makes them. One declares so many things to be a crime that it becomes impossible for men to live without breaking laws. Who wants a nation of law-abiding citizens? What’s there in that for anyone? But just pass the kind of laws that can neither be observed nor enforced or objectively interpreted ? and you create a nation of law-breakers ? and then you cash in on guilt. Now that’s the system, Mr. Reardon, that’s the game, and once you understand it, you’ll be much easier to deal with.

      When talking of laws and government, it’s always useful to keep that in mind.

      1. Three felonies a day…

      2. Ayn Rand was a hack and a horrible human being and libertarians are racist hypocrites!!!!

        /any prog that reads a quote from any of her novels.

    3. Yeah, see, when somebody proposes that, you know they’re either ignorant or just idiots. And since these are people with extensive law enforcement experience, they have to be presumed to be the latter. The only known, statistically-significant intervention that reduces recidivism rates is increasing age at release; the older the person released, the less likely they are to re-offend.

      Other than that, well, sure, you can cite a non-replicated non-blinded teeny-tiny pilot program study to back any version of “recidivism reduction” you like. It’s as much a waste of time and money as homeopathic medicine.

      1. Anti recidivism efforts are mostly just jobs programs for cops and social workers.

  10. Law Enforcement Leaders Release Agenda Calling for Trump Administration to End

    I read up to there and stopped.

  11. Progs want to lock you up for burning fossil fuels, smoking tobacco, and hate speech. Cons want to lock you up for burning the flag, smoking pot, and being here illegally. Both sides want to lock you up for something, so why expect anything to change, except who will get locked up.

    1. Why do you want to burn things? Are you a pyromaniac?

  12. Why do I assume the only real problem they have is that jail overhead eats into the revenue they can generate by fining the shit out of people or just stealing their stuff outright?

    1. What do you think recidivism reduction means? Hiring tons of probation and parole officers.

  13. First, most of these brave local leaders didn’t do shit when they were in a position to. They were for the most part local and didnt have to jail people for state weed laws and city traffic fines.

  14. To me this seems a little harsh.

    http://hotair.com/archives/201…..-in-texas/

  15. Libertarians split with Trump. Finally.

    http://www.foxnews.com/politic…..actic.html

  16. RE: Law Enforcement Leaders Release Agenda Calling for Trump Administration to End ‘Unnecessary Incarceration’
    Current and former prosecutors and police chiefs say “today’s crime policies…are simply ineffective in preserving public safety.”

    I’m sure this is the same agenda they gave Obama back in ’08.
    Now its Trump the Grump’s turn.

  17. “Law Enforcement Leaders To Reduce Crime & Incarceration?a group of over 175 distinguished current and former law enforcement officials…”

    Out of over 800,000 law enforcement officials in the US. We are not impressed. Not to mention that most of these people had the authority to do some of this when they were in office — and didn’t.

  18. None of which Trump needs to do anything to make happen. Those ‘current and former’ prosecutors and police chiefs could simply get off their arses and work to make this happen rather than waiting for Big Daddy to do something.

    In fact, I’d be willing to bet that even slight reform at the local and state level would have orders of magnitude greater effect on the average person than *anything* that could be done at the Federal level.

    But that would mean jeopardizing their paychecks if the don’t have ass-covering instructions from the Feds.

  19. Law Enforcement Against Prohibition, founded by 5 of us in 2002, has led the way towards the concept in this article. We are gaining converts everyday. In the survey last month 1/3 of active officers would treat marijuana like beer.

  20. Noting the $5.5 billion in federal grants given to local law enforcement agencies by the Department of Justice (DOJ) in 2016, the report’s authors write, “to a large degree, these outlays are not targeted at fighting violent and serious crime. In fact, some of these dollars are expended on antiquated law enforcement tools, such as dragnet enforcement of lower-level offenses. This misses an ???? ?? 10 ?????? ????? ???? opportunity to prioritize resources towards more effective ways of fighting violent and serious crime in the states. Without such change, states will continue inefficient enforcement techniques.”

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