Sex Trafficking

The Biggest Sex-Trafficking Bust in FBI History Was Totally Bogus

How two troubled teens and a cop with a cause got dozens of Somali immigrants on the hook for child sex trafficking.

|

WOSU

In the press, it was a "wide-reaching sex-trafficking operation" run by Somali Muslim gangs who forced "girls as young as 12" to sell sex in Minnesota and Tennessee. In reality, the operation—which led to charges against 30 individuals, sex-trafficking convictions for three, and an eight year legal battle—was a fiction crafted by two troubled teenagers, a member of the FBI's human-trafficking task force, and an array of overzealous officials. An opinion released this week by the 6th Circuit Court of Appeals shows that federal prosecuters had no evidence whatsoever to support their "child sex trafficking conspiracy" case outside the seriously flawed testimony of two teenagers, one of whom had "been diagnosed as insane and was off her medication." 

"We conclude from our careful review of the trial transcript and record that, if the prosecution proved any sex trafficking at all (and we have serious doubts that it did), then at best it proved two separate, unrelated, and dissimilar sex-trafficking conspiracies, involving different defendants, albeit with the same alleged victim, namely Jane Doe 2," states the 6th Circuit opinion, written by judges Alice M. Batchelder, Sean F. Cox, and Helene N. White. 

But Jane Doe 2's story was likely completely fabricated, with help from a police officer who was also a member of an FBI human-trafficking task force. The officer was later caught lying to the grand jury and lying during a detention hearing, while Doe and the state's other primary witness were, according to the court, almost entirely "unworthy of belief." 

In initially announcing the bust in 2010, the FBI claimed that "between 2000 and 2010, members and associates of [three affiliated Somali gangs] transported underage Somali and African-American females from the Minneapolis area to Nashville for the purpose of having the females engage in sex acts for money" and some of the victims were "13 years of age and younger." Gang members and their associates also "conspired to obstruct the investigation," the FBI claimed. 

The case received a lot of attention, both in the states involved and nationally. The FBI described it as its biggest human trafficking success to date. FBI Special Agent in Charge Amy Hess said at the time that the arrests "demonstrate the importance of cooperation between state, local and federal law enforcement in the investigation and prosecution of organized crime." 

Mark Gwyn, director of the Tennessee Bureau of Investigation, said the case was "proof of how critical criminal intelligence support and analytical support is to an investigation. The information sharing and dedication by law enforcement agencies in this case is a testament to the lengths agencies will go to protect children."

The lengths they will go to apparently include arresting and prosecuting a lot of Muslim black men based on bogus stories and the flimsiest pretense.  

Thirty individuals were eventually indicted on some sort of sex-trafficking charges. All but one—Andrew Kayachith, an Asian American born in the U.S.—were immigrants or refugees from Somalia and Ethiopia, and all but one were male. Most were between 17 and 22 years old, attending school, and living with their parents. 

A district judge threw out charges against three of the men because they had been minors at the time the alleged crimes occured. The first nine defendants to be tried went before a federal jury in 2012, with jurors returning not guilty verdicts for six of them. (At least one and possibly more were deported anyway.) Three of the defendents—Kayachith, Idris Ibrahim Fahra, and Yassin Abdirahman Yusuf—were found guilty of sex trafficking of a minor, Jane Doe 2. 

When the verdict was returned, Assistant U.S. Attorney Van Vincent spoke of it as a win for victim's rights. "It's very important for victims to understand that you can come forward, people will listen and that people can believe what you have to say about the crime," he told reporters. 

But "believing the victim" uncritically turned out, once again, to be a bad move. By the end of 2012, a federal court had overturned the convictions of Fahra, Kayachith, and Yusuf. The government wasn't giving up though, and appealed to the 6th Circuit Court. 

"The government contends that the district court erred by finding a material variance between the charges in the indictment and the proof at trial—specifically, that the prosecution had charged a single conspiracy but presented evidence at trial that proved, at best, multiple conspiracies," the appeals court decision stated. 

Thus, in this appeal, the question is whether a reasonable juror could find a single, overall conspiracy when the evidence produced at trial is viewed in the government's favor. For the reasons that follow, we AFFIRM the district court's grants of acquittal to defendants Idris Fahra, Andrew Kayachith, and Yassin Yusef.

Beyond the dubious nature of the "overall conspiracy," judges also found scant evidence that sex trafficking had happened at all. 

The case started in November 2008, when St. Paul police officer and FBI sex-trafficking task force member Heather Weyker went to check in on Jane Doe 2, who had been briefly incarcerated in juvenile detention earlier that year. Doe, whose age is still in dispute, was a high-school freshman who lived with her Somali-immigrant family in the Minneapolis area. The court describes Doe's family as "an ultraconservative, African, Muslim household," and Doe as "an Americanized teenager" and "habitual runaway who had a history with the police."

"It has since been established, as many in the Somali community knew at the time, that Jane Doe 2 was older than her then-asserted age of 15 (the age based on her mother's false claim that she was born in September 1994)," the court notes. "The FBI has declared her proffered birth certificate a forgery and substantial evidence has shown that she is at least five months older and likely as much as four years older than her claimed age." It also came out that Doe's "brother" was not actually biologically related to anyone in the family and was "much younger" than had been claimed. 

The parents declined to let Officer Weyker talk to their daughter, so Weyker began meeting with the girl at school. For several months the pair met in secret, meetings which produced 30 recorded interviews and thousands of pages of notes and transcripts. "These meetings also produced a story in which Jane Doe 2 was not a troubled runaway or juvenile delinquent, but was instead an innocent child taken in by a Somali gang who used her for sex, either as a prostitute or for free sex with the gang members," states the court.

At this point, certain aspects of this story and investigation warrant attention. First, despite countless opportunities, Jane Doe 2 had never told this story before—not to her parents, her sister, or any friends; not to any police officer during the many times she was apprehended as a runaway; not upon her incarceration at juvenile detention or during her counseling there. The district court opined that Officer Weyker likely exaggerated or fabricated important aspects of this story, noting (among other inconsistencies) that Weyker's final reports frequently referred to sex for money while that assertion was conspicuously absent from her handwritten notes, appearing only once in all of those rough notes. And Jane Doe 2 herself furthered the district court's suspicion when she testified on cross examination that Weyker had misstated facts in the reports, adding to and omitting things from her statements.

Elsewhere, the district court caught Weyker lying to the grand jury and, later, lying during a detention hearing, and scolded her for it on the record. The defense has since pointed out that Weyker also lied on an application to get Jane Doe 2's family some $3,000 from the Tennessee victim's compensation fund, by claiming "abduction" (Jane Doe 2 flatly denied an abduction) and endorsing the validity of the forged birth certificate.

Finally, it is curious that even though Officer Weyker (the lead agent), Jane Doe 2 (the principal victim-witness), and all but a few of the 30 defendants reside in Minnesota, and an overwhelming portion of the events at issue occurred in Minnesota, the federal prosecutor in Minnesota did not prosecute this case in Minnesota. 

Instead, the federal prosecutor in Nashville, Tennessee, prosecuted this case in the Middle District of Tennessee because, in April 2009, Jane Doe 2 accompanied five boys (all charged in the indictment and two tried as defendants here) on a car trip to Nashville, without informing her parents, who eventually reported her missing. When the Minneapolis/St. Paul police tracked her cell phone to Nashville, Officer Weyker involved the FBI and turned this latest "runaway" into a presumed kidnapping. The FBI relayed the cellphone location to the Nashville Police who located the group and arrested Jane Doe 2 as a juvenile delinquent and a runaway, and questioned her separately from the boys.

Initially, she told the police that one of the Somali boys, Hollywood (with them on the trip and charged in the indictment, but not tried in this case), was her boyfriend; that she had come with them on the trip willingly; and that she had sex with several people over the preceding few days because she was upset with Hollywood for ignoring her. She also wrote out and signed a statement saying the same. She did not mention any prostitution or sex trafficking. But when the Nashville Police put her on the telephone with Officer Weyker, she changed her story to include acts of prostitution and sex trafficking.

The Nashville Police had also arrested the five boys, for contributing to the delinquency of a minor. Because none could afford bail, they waited in jail and made several telephone calls, recordings of which were introduced at trial as evidence to connect many of the 30 defendants criminally. More importantly, when Officer Weyker and the FBI task force got involved, and Jane Doe 2 started talking about sex and prostitution, the Nashville federal prosecutor was able to put her story together with certain other witnesses, most notably Jane Doe 5, a Nashville resident, and then charged these five boys (and 25 others) with felony sex trafficking.

Jane Does 2 and 5 did not know each other, and only one of the 30 defendants allegedly linked the pair. "Jane Doe 5's own testimony is the sole evidence of her part in the alleged sex trafficking conspiracy," the appeals court noted.

However, Jane Doe 5 suffers from an undisclosed mental illness and was off of her medication during the trial. "She did not know what day or month it was, she misidentified or could not identify many defendants, she contradicted herself repeatedly (on major issues, such as whether or not she had sex for money), and she argued with counsel over the smallest of details," according to the court. 

Ultimately, the judges came away with "acute concern," based on a "painstaking review of the record," that the prosecution's entire case may be "fictitious" and the state's two primary witnesses "unworthy of belief." Both women "repeatedly contradicted, disavowed, and refuted their own testimony," the judges note, "while other portions of their testimony defied belief or were rendered implausible by indisputable contradictory evidence." Even if we take Jane Doe 2's testimony as true, "this looks less like an organized venture than a crime of opportunity, involving these criminally ambitious young men and this gullible (or, more likely, reckless or rebellious) young woman," the court states. 

NEXT: Mount St. Mary's University president quits, apparently in part because of attempts to fire professors for criticizing him

Editor's Note: We invite comments and request that they be civil and on-topic. We do not moderate or assume any responsibility for comments, which are owned by the readers who post them. Comments do not represent the views of Reason.com or Reason Foundation. We reserve the right to delete any comment for any reason at any time. Report abuses.

Please to post comments

102 responses to “The Biggest Sex-Trafficking Bust in FBI History Was Totally Bogus

  1. This is satanic ritual abuse all over again.

    1. Yep.

      1. Quite to the contrary, this foolish article wrongfully accuses our great nation’s law enforcement authorities of misconduct. Were the defendants from Somalia? If so, there was already reason to set aside the usual “presumption” of innocence. By deconstructing the law and suggesting that victims of crimes are to be subjected to “criticism,” the author reveals a certain untoward tendency to twist words and stir up controversy. Just think: if the victims of Internet trolls and “parody” emails were subjected to “criticism,” how would convictions ever be secured in such cases? See, for example, the documentation of America’s leading criminal “satire” and criminal troll case at:

        http://raphaelgolbtrial.wordpress.com/

        There, the victims of a serious pattern of criminal conduct have, for over seven years of litigation, been “uncritically” believed, and rightly so, by judges, juries, the press, the so-called “First Amendment” community (which of course has itself become a joke), and academics teaching in universities that have been erected in several neighborhoods of the city of New York, to say nothing of other cities. So I would suggest that the author consider what she is saying, meditate upon its consequences, and realize that this decision of a liberal appellate court is mistaken. Rather than encourage disrespect for our criminal justice system, let us all agree that certain crimes must be punished, regardless of “criticism.”

        1. Quixote. You were tried and convicted of fraud. You are a fraud who is trying to say he was using satire. Doesn’t work that way. Please just stop now and go away.

          1. I would have at ye with my lance for such foolery, or shall I say Tom-foolery; but before I thrust I cannot help but wonder, was there something in my contribution that you hastily mistook for satire? I do take heart in your effort, however, because I think you must agree with me that the “First-Amendment” dissent of the chief judge of the New York high court in our nation’s leading criminal “satire” case (which I linked in my comment above) is especially deplorable and dangerous. I submit we should all be grateful that the judge in question has now been made to retire from that great American court of law because of his advanced age, characterized as it so often is by incipient senility. They say he is now working on a plan to close down and abandon the Rikers Island penal institution, surely an appropriately quixotic assignment for the author of such a farcical legal opinion.

            1. And to supplement my above remarks, allow me again to thank you (along with others who have joined my anti-Troll campaign) for succinctly arguing my very point: not only the sex-traffickers who lurk in our midst, but the Internet frauds who spread mayhem on our campuses, damaging the well-earned reputations of their eminent humanistic victims with “confessions” of misconduct (“if I had given credit to this man, I would have been banned from conferences around the world”) and then claiming “academic satire” as a justification for their scandalous travesties, are crooks who face prosecution and prison. And thank heavens their victims are not subject to “criticism,” because that would certainly risk impeding the result we seem to agree must be obtained by all necessary means. Let us remind all readers that “neither good faith nor truth is a defense” to such charges, and the same is of course true with sex-trafficking.

    2. Yes, the secular leftist version.

  2. Two troubled teens, one of whom was “insane,” and a lying FBI agent. Come on, ENB, admit it: you made up that first paragraph, didn’t you?

    1. I thought the punchline was “off her meds”. I had to laugh at that.

  3. Initially, she told the police that one of the Somali boys, Hollywood (with them on the trip and charged in the indictment, but not tried in this case), was her boyfriend; that she had come with them on the trip willingly; and that she had sex with several people over the preceding few days because she was upset with Hollywood for ignoring her.

    I think I saw this movie.

  4. The lengths they will go to apparently include arresting and prosecuting a lot of Muslim black men based on bogus stories and the flimsiest pretense.

    Unpossible. Political correctness prevents the state from arresting Muslims.

    1. How dare you deny that Rotherham is here! Just like we told you it would.

      1. Minnesota’s new motto:

        At least we ain’t Rotherham, Doncha’ know?!

  5. “off of her medication during the trial” – Lying/schizophrenia is simply a cognitive fallacy, it is not a real disease. These drugs are not helping anyone – they are destroying their brains and creating lifelong patients. For her own sake she should not start again.

    1. I personally believe cancer doesn’t exist and is a fake disease so the government can claim people died of cancer when in reality those people were killed by shadowy, underground, state-financed organ thieves.

      1. I knew it!

        *tightens foil hat*

      2. I’ve heard people say cancer is something new and scary because people a hundred years ago didn’t get diagnosed with cancer.

      3. The coolest kind of disease is the one that the person who denies it is ‘paranoid’. Which is guess what? A symptom of the disease!

        1. Whenever I tell my doctors my theory about organ harvesting, they always tell me I’m being paranoid. This is just proof about how right I am.

          1. Sorry to break it to you but any disease the denial of which is a symptom of it, is not a real disease. Furthermore, the fact that this kid lies about stuff (at the behest of the FBI) should not be used as ‘evidence’ that she has it. It just shouldn’t.

            1. “Sorry to break it to you but any disease the denial of which is a symptom of it, is not a real disease. ”

              Why? If someone has an illness that impacts their brain, that illness can easily make them deny its existence.

              We know for a fact Alzheimer’s is real. You want to know what Alzheimer’s patients often do? Deny that they have the illness because they can’t remember that they have the illness. People with dementia often don’t know they have dementia.

              Are you going to tell me that Alzheimer’s isn’t real now?

              1. We know for a fact Alzheimer’s is real. You want to know what Alzheimer’s patients often do? Deny that they have the illness because they can’t remember that they have the illness. People with dementia often don’t know they have dementia.

                Ever notice how Alzheimer’s isn’t called a “mental illness” and isn’t treated by psychiatrists?

                1. Alzheimer’s disease is formally recognized as a mental illness. The disease and its symptoms are outlined in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV-TR), which is the main tool used to diagnose mental illnesses such as Schizophrenia and Borderline Personality Disorder.

                  I think we don’t currently know exactly how the brain functions so there are going to be major changes in how we understand and treat mental problems over time, but if someone is suffering from hallucinations, I’d like to know what you think that is if not some kind of mental illness.

                  1. Wow really? So this whole FBI debacle can be blamed on this girl’s ‘schizophrenia’ if I cannot prove that her ‘hallucinations’ are completely fake?

                    1. “So this whole FBI debacle can be blamed on this girl’s ‘schizophrenia’ if I cannot prove that her ‘hallucinations’ are completely fake?”

                      Yeah, not what I said. The FBI debacle is on the FBI.

                      The fact people have hallucinations is just evidence that mental illness exists. We don’t currently understand the mechanism 100% but you can’t say ‘there is definitely no such thing as mental illness!’ without explaining where some of the symptoms come from. How do people develop paranoid delusions and hallucinations if there is no such thing as mental disorders?

                    2. Yes and there must be such a thing as Cooties! I hear people talking about it! There’s even a cure for it!

                    3. Last I checked, cooties don’t cause people to develop major auditory hallucinations, which is a common occurrence with people diagnosed with schizophrenia.

                    4. When people find the mechanisms of “mental illness,” they become actual illnesses. Alzheimer’s isn’t treated only by psychiatrists, but also by neurologists.

                      The point of Szaszianism is not that people’s brains don’t malfunction. It’s that there is no such thing as “mental illness,” because illnesses are of the body. “Mental illness” is just another way of saying “you don’t conform socially,” unless you find an illness of the body underlying it.

                    5. Except there is evidence of things like schizophrenia that can be observed in changes to the brain.

                      Moreover, the guy I’m actually arguing with isn’t even a Szaszian, he actually appears to not believe that any brain malfunctions are even occurring.

                      There are actual differences in brain function between schizophrenics and non-schizophrenics and the disease appears to be highly heritable.

                    6. No actually for the most part these differences are caused by the drugs she is taking. That’s why I said she should stop taking them!

              2. Yes people become senile. As for Alzheimer’s, it’s not a real disease. They have proven that the ‘amyloid plaque’ theory is completely bogus. Plus they will not argue that they are not senile, at least not coherently. When the denial of the condition is used as ‘proof’ – that is the signature of a witch hunt. Other signs? When people ridicule the target of the hunt, and accuse them of having the symptoms under attack. Schizophrenia is not a real disease, even if the paranoia is used as fodder for years of psychiatric shenanigans. Even if it is blamed for a bogus FBI case, which even you admit is ‘amazing’.

                1. I think I’ve figured you out. Ironically, taking your own meds would probably solve all these conspiracy theory-type comments about mental illness.

                  1. What’s more despicable than your comment is that everyone else piles on the bullying. No wonder the mass delusion of ‘mental illness’ has lasted for so long. Historians will find interactions like this quite instructive.

                    1. I for one cannot stand living in a world where people in the Reason comment section talk shit to each other.

                    2. Let it out. Good, just let it all out.

                    3. Now from the sixth hour there was darkness over all the land unto the ninth hour.
                      And about the ninth hour AddictionMyth cried with a loud voice, saying, Eli, Eli, lama sabachthani? that is to say, My God, my God, why hast thou forsaken me?
                      Some of them that stood there, when they heard that, said, This man calleth for Elias.
                      And straightway one of them ran, and took a sponge, and filled it with vinegar, and put it on a reed, and gave him to drink.
                      The rest said, Let be, let us see whether Elias will come to save him.
                      AddictionMyth, when he had cried again with a loud voice, yielded up the ghost.
                      And, behold, the veil of the temple was rent in twain from the top to the bottom; and the earth did quake, and the rocks rent;
                      And the graves were opened; and many bodies of the saints which slept arose,
                      And came out of the graves after his resurrection, and went into the holy city, and appeared unto many.

                      AddictionMyth Has Posted, AddictionMyth Has Been Ridiculed, AddictionMyth Will Troll Again

              3. Those old people are just acting out. Spare the rod spoil the geriatric I always say.

                1. Even the FBI profiles have identified permissive parenting as a principle cause of terrorism and violence. Funny how they are now trying to cover their tracks.

                  1. The FBI never said permissive parenting is a primary cause of terrorism. The link you gave me the other day making this claim was about school violence, not terrorism.

                    1. San Bernardino shooter’s father: “I told him: stop worrying about Israel. They will be gone in a couple years anyway.”

                    2. Link? Not only can I not find any evidence he said that, I also don’t see how that’s an example of permissive parenting.

                    3. “The father said he counseled his son to be patient because, he said, in time political changes in the Middle East will accomplish his desires.”
                      here

                      Read the whole interview in La Stampa for the details. This is a perfect example of permissive parenting. Instead he should say, “I’m sorry you hate Israel but you don’t have the right to kill people.”

                  2. This is why I don’t have kids. I doubt I have it in me to beat the shit out of them to keep them from becoming Muslim terrorist.

        2. You’re a Szaszian, we get it. So is nikki, but she still manages to not jump on that hobby horse in every single thread. Show us the entirety of who you are. Do you like cilantro? What is your favorite color? Post a twerk video from time to time. Tell us who would win in a fight a pit bull or four four-year-olds.

          1. Smart – side with the bullies who call people ‘mentally ill’ because they disagree. This will put you in a good position when Trump goes after the people who show ‘red flags and early warning signs’, because you know, they are always present in situations like this.

            1. side with the bullies who call people ‘mentally ill’ because they disagree

              Who said I was doing that? I’m actually sympathetic to many of Szasz’s arguments. If you weren’t such a tiresome, self-righteous zealot with his head firmly up his ass, you might have picked up on that.

              1. OK so I am ‘infidel’ (zealot) and ‘in denial’ (head up ass). Now just add that I am ‘lying’ and ‘crazy’ and ‘stupid’:

                  1. OK good, you got lying (mendacious). Maybe by ‘narrative’ you are implying that my way of understanding things is crazy – I will give you that one. Now you just need to get ‘stupid’:

                    1. Please, whine some more down at us from the peaks of Mount Unwarranted Sense of Moral Righteousness. We are all interested in what you have to say and we appreciate your contributions to this discussion. Bless up.

                    2. OK I don’t know what that is, but it’s a new one for me. Nice work! You did a great job of showing how people gang up and bully people to prevent them from speaking the truth. I wonder if such strategies will work in the internet age. I guess we shall find out.

          2. Is this the part where I strip HM?

            Too late, I’m already naked.

              1. 2 hr 25 min?!? Ain’t nobody got time for that!

  6. This is exactly why America needs more federal agents protecting the border to prevent Muslim immigrants from entering the country.

    1. Messicans, not Mooselimbs

  7. Every time I see something about Minnesota in a national headline it is always facepalm worthy. Le sigh.

  8. I feel like we’re getting to the point where the FBI has invented and started more criminal organizations than criminals have.

    1. If by ‘getting to the point’, you mean ‘since when J Edgar Hoover was director’, I agree.

  9. The court describes Doe’s family as “an ultraconservative, African, Muslim household,” and Doe as “an Americanized teenager” and “habitual runaway who had a history with the police.”

    “It has since been established, as many in the Somali community knew at the time, that Jane Doe 2 was older than her then-asserted age of 15 (the age based on her mother’s false claim that she was born in September 1994),” the court notes. “The FBI has declared her proffered birth certificate a forgery and substantial evidence has shown that she is at least five months older and likely as much as four years older than her claimed age.”

    So how many police officers have been involved in kidnapping an adult woman and returning her to her parents’ household for continued captivity?

    1. Instead, the federal prosecutor in Nashville, Tennessee, prosecuted this case in the Middle District of Tennessee because, in April 2009, Jane Doe 2 accompanied five boys (all charged in the indictment and two tried as defendants here) on a car trip to Nashville, without informing her parents, who eventually reported her missing. When the Minneapolis/St. Paul police tracked her cell phone to Nashville, Officer Weyker involved the FBI and turned this latest “runaway” into a presumed kidnapping. The FBI relayed the cellphone location to the Nashville Police who located the group and arrested Jane Doe 2 as a juvenile delinquent and a runaway, and questioned her separately from the boys.

      Why do all the human traffickers in this story seem to work for the state?

      1. Government is just another name for the humans we traffic together, Nikki.

  10. “”It has since been established, as many in the Somali community knew at the time, that Jane Doe 2 was older than her then-asserted age of 15 (the age based on her mother’s false claim that she was born in September 1994),” the court notes. “The FBI has declared her proffered birth certificate a forgery and substantial evidence has shown that she is at least five months older and likely as much as four years older than her claimed age.” It also came out that Doe’s “brother” was not actually biologically related to anyone in the family and was “much younger” than had been claimed. ”

    This entire story is amazing.

  11. Even thought this case has been totally discredited, it will continue to be cited for years as an example of the bad business of Sex Trafficking.

  12. The FBI needs these crimes to justify their existence. First of all they knew about Clinton’s email server for years but did nothing so that they could have a job for a hundred agents for month after month. Beyond that they recruit for drug addiction:
    “Hi, I’m Jim Comey. I’m the director of the FBI. We’re talking to you today because we are facing a crisis, a crisis that is killing far too many people?prescription drug and heroin abuse.”

    And for social puppeteering (violent extremism).

    1. Every disease on earth was actually developed in secret laboratories governed by a coalition of the Illuminati and the Lizard people and were then unleashed upon an unsuspecting populace as a means of social control.

      The moon does not exist. It is a hologram projected into space by scientists so that they can claim the tides are caused by lunar cycles rather than Cthulhu.

      1. This entire story is amazing.

      2. How do the Greys fit in?

        Are they the ones making sure Fois Gras and Truffles are overpriced?

        1. Yes, and they killed New Coke via a heavily falsified smear campaign.

          New Coke would have changed the world.

          1. Those bastards!

  13. Forward thinking drug warriors need to make sure they have an alternate boogeyman at the ready in case their current gravy train goes off the rails.

    1. Speech and rape. It’s actually been well under way for years. Europe has long been waging a war against ‘hate speech’ and ‘libel’ and this is what Trump wants to start up again. It’s why people get so excited for him. Not to mention, building the wall to exacerbate heroin ‘addiction’ by forcing people to take desperate measures.

      1. Are you the spawn of a sordid affair between HERCULE and LoneWacko?

      2. Addiction is a myth but not for the reasons you give.

        People in chronic pain chronically take pain relievers.

        It is PTSD. And there is genetics involved. The genes have been identified.

        If you don’t have the genes the PTSD wears off.

    2. Forward thinking drug warriors need to make sure they have an alternate boogeyman at the ready in case their current gravy train goes off the rails.

      Harry J. Anslinger to the rescue.

  14. Minnesota has a talent for this sort of thing. A loony prosecutor named Kathleen Morris had people believing that there was a child abuse ring in Scott County MN. There was the usual circus of “recovered memories” and other such charlatanry. A witch hunt that wrecked many lives and accomplished nothing.

    A pair of Minneapolis cops persuaded people that there was a black pimp operated pipeline transporting Minnesota’s blonde maidens to work as prostitutes in New York. The cops announced to the press that they were going on a secret mission to Times Square. Another fiasco.

    1. I sent some time in Minn. years ago,in 1967, on a project at 3M. People I ran into seemed pretty level headed, some of them were state legislators, they and I living at the same hotel. What happened?

  15. *cough* hat tip *cough*

  16. Reads like the forces of law and order were knowingly on the wrong side of the facts, though I could be misunderstanding. That possibility being in play, it seems like a gross miscarriage of justice was here involved, which leads to the following question. Have any of the “perps”, looks like the “perps” here were the “good guys”, been called to task.If not, how come?

  17. These two headlines belong on the same page. “The Biggest Sex-Trafficking Bust in FBI History Was Totally Bogus”, and “International Megan’s Law passes Congress on 2-1-16”

Comments are closed.