Public schools

Schools Hire Consultants to Make Recess Safe, Structured, Sad

Is there a war on childhood?

|

Recess
Dreamstime

College students may be emotionally coddled at every turn, but at least most young people enjoy sixteen years of creative, unstructured free time in school, right? Well, not exactly: elementary schoolers must navigate a dismayingly sophisticated web of cultural factors (like helicopter parenting) and administrative policies (like zero tolerance discipline) designed to make them helpless and emotionally dependent upon authority figures long before they ever set foot on a college campus.

Consider this: several Minnesota public schools have hired "recess consultants" to create structured playground activities for students during the brief part of the day when kids are supposedly free to do something creative on their own. According to The Minneapolis Star Tribune:

Two Edina elementary schools, worried about the politics of the playground, are taking an unusual step to police it: They have hired a recess consultant.

Some parents have welcomed the arrival of the firm Playworks, which says recess can be more inclusive and beneficial to children if it's more structured and if phrases like, "Hey, you're out!" are replaced with "good job" or "nice try."

But some of the kids at Concord and Normandale Elementary say they are confused, or that the consultants are ruining their play time.

"The philosophy of Playworks does not fit Concord," said Kathy Sandven, a parent of twin boys who attend the school. "It is a structured philosophy — an intervention philosophy — not allowing kids for free play."

Playworks has been in operation since 1996. In fairness to the organization, Playworks claims that it doesn't take control of kids' recess time; it just provides safe, inclusive activities for students who have trouble making friends and participating in recess on their own. It can also point to studies showing that Playworks programs reduce bullying and accident rates.

But while the Tribune story takes great pains to present Playworks in the best possible light, the recess consultants certainly seem disruptive in practice (and are disliked by a whole lot of kids and parents):

Forest Elementary in Robbinsdale Area Schools spends $14,500 for an on-site coordinator to spend one week a month at the school.

At the school, recess is made up of clear adult-facilitated activities.

On a day last week, a kindergartner said he wanted to play basketball. A recess coach explained that wasn't a choice at the time; he decided to play another game.

It wouldn't surprise me if the presence of Playworks staff on playgrounds does indeed reduce the amount of fighting among kids. There's some evidence that putting more cops on the streets reduces certain kinds of violence, too. But that doesn't mean doing either of these things is healthy for a free society. In the case of the kids, it's worth wondering what kinds of people they will grow up to be if they are never given an iota of unstructured, adult-free playtime. As Bloomberg View columnist (and former Reason editor) Virginia Postrel wrote recently in response to a proposed tag ban:

Behind these policies is the superstitious belief that vigorous physical contact and make-believe violence will beget immediate and future real physical harms—magical thinking that fundamentally misunderstands how children play and learn. Prohibiting rough-and-tumble play doesn't make recess safer or kids less apt to hurt others. To the contrary, the bans deprive children of the very experiences they need to master peaceful social interactions.

"To simply forbid it is like telling children, 'We're not going to let you eat today, because the food might be contaminated,'" says Frances Carlson, author of Big Body Play, a guide published by the National Association for the Education of Young Children. "Children can't live without it, so they do it in hiding." Over the past three decades, as the research into its importance has mounted, the NAEYC has gone from hostile to supportive of full-body play. Unfortunately, laws and schools haven't kept up, hurting kids' development.

Contrary to what squeamish authorities seem to think, it's the kids who don't engage in rough-and-tumble play who actually tend to be more violent later on in life. So, says Carlson, forbidding playful physical contact "stokes the fire as opposed to diminishing it."

For my part, I can't help but think that this trend toward structured playtime has something to do with the rise of the campus safe-space movement (some evidence points toward yes). Is it any surprise that teens who have never enjoyed anything approaching actual freedom—who spent their purported free time being coached by paid consultants on the "right way" to play with others—cringe in horror when they arrive at college and are finally on their own? Is it any surprise that some small but significant minority of these teens cry out for the structure, the regime of emotional protection, under which they have lived their entire lives?

Maybe we should think twice about making recess as joyless and authoritarian as the rest of the school day.

Advertisement

NEXT: Pension Reform Initiative in California Getting a Rewrite

Editor's Note: We invite comments and request that they be civil and on-topic. We do not moderate or assume any responsibility for comments, which are owned by the readers who post them. Comments do not represent the views of Reason.com or Reason Foundation. We reserve the right to delete any comment for any reason at any time. Report abuses.

  1. Dude you know that is gonna be some kinda cool.

    http://www.Full-Anon.tk

    1. Succinct and on-topic as usual Anonbot. Well done.

    2. Hey! Where is my hat tip?

      I’m no chump that you can give the high hat to Robby! I’m a multiple hat tip recipient.

      I bet you pronounce it Edeena too.

      You should have at least mentioned that the best comment was from someone who opined that recess was extra important in Edina because it helped them digest the cake they ate for lunch.

      * For people not hip to Minnesoda lore. The nick name for people from Edina has been “cake eaters” for years because they used to the the ultra rich suburb of the Twin Cities. They earned the wrath of the entire state when they built the first indoor hockey rink in the state and dominated the hockey tourney for several years afterward because they could skate year round.

      1. There is no authority to petty that we don’t default to here. It’s similar elsewhere in the upper Midwest but Minnesota seems to have an especially bad case of this disease. I blame all the Scandinavians.

      2. Suddenly, The Mighty Ducks makes sense.

  2. Consider this: several Minnesota public schools have hired “recess consultants” to create structured playground activities for students during the brief part of the day when kids are supposedly free to do something creative on their own.

    And thus do administrators continue to make it ever more obvious that these are simply prisons for children.

    1. We should be preparing children for prison.

    2. They are, but they are also magnets for parasites. Think of the kind of person who goes “oh I can exploit the idiotic fears of parents and administrators by offering to ‘consult’ about how to…let kids play at recess!”

      Idiots and parasites will always find one another, usually to everyone else’s loss.

      1. +1 New Management Consulting Fad

        1. Six (year old) Sigma

          1. Don’t you make fun of my green belt.

          2. *narrows gaze*

            *loosens non-optimized black belt*

  3. 16 years? WTF? I sure am glad I got my sentence over with way back when there were only 12 years of primary statist programming camp education. Starting school at 2 or staying in high school until you’re 22 doesn’t sound like much fun to me.

  4. Some parents have welcomed the arrival of the firm Playworks, which says recess can be more inclusive and beneficial to children if it’s more structured and if phrases like, “Hey, you’re out!” are replaced with “good job” or “nice try.”

    I can think of a phrase or two I’d like to use.

    1. Quit crying…rub some dirt in it…and quit picking your nose

  5. Nothing says “fun” like highly structured activities with an enforced vocabulary.

    1. How would they know if they were having fun right otherwise?

      1. Fun must be quantized and evaluated, otherwise it’s just a waste of our time.

        1. What would you call a single unit of fun?

          A funit (pronounced eff you nit)?

          1. Funit is good, but you must have a time and intensity measurement. Do funits stack? Is five individual and spaced out funits equivalent to a five funit block? How are funits–a subjective experience–made regular across all populations?

            1. NERRRRDDDD

              1. Shut up, you filthy anarchist.

            2. Subjective? I think you missed the memo. These benevolent recess guardians will be making sure that everyone has fun in exactly the same way.

            3. You need to evaluate funits on a supply slope, since funits are subject to diminishing marginal utility. Once we have found an equilibrium point at which the utility of an additional funit is no greater than the utility of an addutional edunit, we will have determined the appropriate ratio of recess to class time.

            4. In non-Eudaemonic reference frames fun is relative. You must apply a Lorenz transform once you near the point of maximum fun which can never be exceeded.

    2. If you disagree, you’re mentally ill.

      1. Luckily they have a pill for that!

        1. If you disagree, you’re mentally ill.

          1. Luckily they have a pill for that too!

            1. Phew! That’s a relief.

              1. They have a pill to ease your relief.

      2. I don’t think we should let elementary schools kids have guns. You aren’t going to change my mind about this, Nikki.

        1. Are you saying that our children have no basic human rights?

          1. No, I’m saying that by any reasonable definition of the term, children are insane.

            1. I absolutely concur and have a substantial body of proof to defend this statement.

              1. have a substantial body

                Pics?

            2. This is why you stick children into public schools, to anesthetize them and render their brains into delicious, nutritious fat suitable for the civic body.

            3. No, I’m saying that by any reasonable definition of the term, children are insane.

              The oldest two broodlings pound on each other relatively frequently. The only forced discipline that actually stops the hitting; structured exchange of punishment.

              I’ve only done it once, but a combination of reverse psychology and personal justice/morality can reduce them to tears when someone compels them to punish their sibling(s) when they know they’ll be punished in turn.

              I’ve preached “You worry about you.” enough, I wonder if the two ideas shouldn’t be linked more intrinsically.

              1. So….wait. You made your kids beat each other?

                1. I know it’s tricky Warty so I’ll try to be more clear; if you stop two kids from beating on each other and organize the punishment according to their wishes, did you beat them? Did you make them beat each other?

                  How about this; if you father two children and their natural state is to fight one another, did you make them fight one another?

                  1. So you made your children beat each other.

                  2. If a tree falls in the forest and you haven’t made your children beat each other, did it make a sound?

                    1. Do you invite over your buddies and bet on which one will win? Does the loser have to dress up like a girl and dance like Alizee?

                    2. I hadn’t thought to invite people over, usually the winner was the one that got desert but I could probably be making some money.

                      Since you’re the one with all the ideas, got anything as embarrassing but less French?

              2. The only forced discipline that actually stops the hitting; structured exchange of punishment.

                Not workable w/ my brother and I… we beat on each other for fun.

                We had an “auxilliary” cop down the street from us- he just might have been called 12-15 times due to us fighting when we were between 10-15.

    3. “We put the ‘fun’ in fundamentally retarded!”

    4. Welcome to the continued pussification of our kids.

      Alternatives?

      Hurt playing? Go to the nurse. She’ll call EMS if you really messed up.
      Been Bullied? See the on-site counselor to enroll in the on-site kung-fu class.

      etc.

  6. Are the Recess Consultants properly licensed by the state?

  7. Kids say that the consultants are ruining their play time? Perhaps some of the good students would like to inform the grownups exactly who is complaining.

    1. Back when I was in elementary, the good kids would have been beaten up. The recess nazi would have probably quit the first day in fear of their life. Ah, the good ol days…

      1. Sounds like my elementary school experience: Kids lined up around the corner out of sight of the teachers, smoking. 6th graders peddling smokes and Kool-Aid to second graders. Knife fights over turf.

        Good times, good times.

        1. …and recess was referred to as “Thunderdome”.

  8. Minnesota is more and more proving it can out California California.

    1. Outshined!

  9. Forest Elementary in Robbinsdale Area Schools spends $14,500 for an on-site coordinator to spend one week a month at the school.

    Damn, it’s good to be a Gangsta.

    1. You want to know what’s a real scam on the playground? The playground. There was a story about almost-new school playground equipment that wound up on the grounds of a church in another city. Turns out the school had to move the equipment for a construction project, and the rules for reassembling them elsewhere or just storing them until the construction ended are so onerous, it’s cheaper and easier to buy new again. So the demolition guy took the parts and brought them to his church, which was very grateful, and the school had no complaints.

  10. I hope the Playworks employees out in the field monitoring recess at least have snappy uniforms.

    1. A nice gray Mao suit would be fitting

    2. I see an employment opportunity for Old Man with Candy.

      See, you can turn your hobbies into careers!

      1. He already has a very lucrative career as a pediatric gynecologist.

    3. They must have at least a whistle and a clipboard.

    4. The Playworks consultants deployed to “help” the children have “fun”.
      http://static.dolimg.com/lucas…..42b158.jpg

      1. “deployed,” I like that. Was he delivered by drop-pod from the hive cluster or simply airlifted in?

      2. I imagine the kids are properly sedated, too.

    5. Maybe something in brown?

    6. Preferably something by Hugo Boss…

  11. Get this, my son has to take an after school gym class because he didn’t have gym last year and the all-knowing school administrators couldn’t figure out where else to fit it into the remainder of his high school career. An after school class for four hours which they don’t provide transportation from afterwards.

    1. Four hours of gym? How many times a week?

      1. Two days a week for a month and a half.

        1. Nightmarish. Does he still have to shower with a bunch of guys in a totally manly and heterosexual way?

          1. No, he showers at home. No more scurrying into and out of the shower with your hands covering your dick like in my day.

            1. I liked how despite still being pretty small for my age in the 9th grade, the towels still weren’t large enough to wrap all the way around myself. It was like being on a movie set design by Jared from Subway.

              1. The showers at my junior high had a huge window in one end so the teacher could “make sure everyone went in”.

                1. “make sure everyone went in”.

                  WTH?

                  Gym teachers were so very obsessed with making sure kids showered. It was really fucking creepy.

                  1. That’s why everyone covered their dicks. It wasn’t the other kids we weren’t comfortable with.

                2. “make sure everyone went in”.

                  All the way in, or was just the tip sufficient?

                  Asking for Old Man with Candy.

            2. You may have some body image issues. There’s a pill for that.

            3. You couldn’t find anyone else to cover your dick for you?

              1. There was that one kid who offered, Hugh. Nice guy, but I managed on my own.

          2. When does the world deliver the Starship Troopers co-ed shower anyway? I REQUIRE MINE TO COME WITH DINA MEYER. Denise Richards (young) would be an excellent plus as well.

            1. Sorry Epi, we’re fresh out of Dina Meyer. But don’t worry, because we’ve already dispatched Jake Busey to take her place in your shower.

              1. ROWR

                And that’s bullshit, Hugh, you can’t have Dina all to yourself. GIVE HER TO ME

                1. I’ll tell you what: I’ll throw in Casper Van Dien as a bonus at no extra charge. Because he will literally work for zero dollars.

                  But do not ask for Clancy Brown because a) he wasn’t in the shower scene, and b) you couldn’t handle it.

                  1. Van Dien isn’t worth anything, so that deal sucks. I want Amy Smart and Michael Ironside, or no deal.

    2. So, public school?

      1. You got it. It’s on the edge of “inner city” so everything has to be extra structured.

  12. But that doesn’t mean doing either of these things is healthy for a free society.

    Bug or feature? Also, don’t forget that a generation in which everyone got an award is now running things.

  13. So, no more “Smear the Queer”?

    1. We used to play that without knowing what it meant.

      1. You really had no clue as to why you were always “The Queer?”

      2. I still don’t know what that means, but then again I didn’t hang with the bullies.

        1. You run around with a football while everyone else tries to tackle you. The longer you stay up, the better you are. The person who tackles you gets the ball. Rinse, repeat.

          1. So, rugby, basically?

            (I know, I know, not really.)

  14. I know a number of schools have banned playing tag, but I be they can still play grab-ass at recess because banning that might be considered homophobic.

    http://www.cbsnews.com/news/ny…..ety-fears/

    I wonder, is it homophobic for a kid to refuse to play in a game of grab-ass?

    P.S. Could a gay student win a suit against a fundamentalist for refusing to cater his grab-ass birthday party?

    1. Little kids are such fucking oppressors.

  15. The old system produced the emotionally stunted adults that are pushing this crap.

    My solution? Reopen the fighting pits.

    1. You really should have feeding colesiums to sort out your weaker hatchlings

    2. My solution? Reopen the fighting pits.

      Sorry, LP, see above.

      Give any set of kids autonomy and an open area and they’ll establish fighting pits on their own.

      Intervene and set up a system whereby each kid will get a free shot at someone and they, in turn, will get to take a free shot from someone and then they start to learn some lessons.

      1. Intervene and set up a system whereby each kid will get a free shot at someone and they, in turn, will get to take a free shot from someone and then they start to learn some lessons.

        What the fuck? Are you just putting on a stupid fucking tuffgai act here or are you an actual psychopath?

        1. What the fuck? Are you just putting on a stupid fucking tuffgai act here or are you an actual psychopath?

          So, actually have tried it and had kids explain to you why they know it’s wrong or is it just wrong because you know it’s wrong and you’ve always been told that?

          1. You’re literally just babbling at this point. I guess that tells us all we need to know.

          2. Have I tried…what? Having children fight for my amusement? No, no I haven’t.

            You stupid redneck psychopath. You have no idea that you’ve done anything wrong. You are pathetic. Pathetic. I hope someday before you die you realize it.

      2. And what lessons would those be? Please, elaborate.

        1. And what lessons would those be?

          That their gay uncle who he cut out of their lives can’t save them now?

          1. That their gay uncle who he cut out of their lives can’t save them now?

            WTF is wrong with your reading ability?

            I didn’t cut their uncle out of their life and never had any intent to. They have other gay relatives and community members who, knowingly and other, they engage with. I had gay friends and co-workers (again knowingly or other) growing up and through school. The huge difference, in my experience, is the one’s who deliberately came out and made a point to do so, made sure to force their judgments and biases, right or wrong, on everyone else.

            Still waiting on my brother-in-law to offer to watch the kids for literally any length of time rather than just offer to tell my wife and I what we can and can’t do in our relationship.

            1. You cut your kids’ uncle out of their lives because you don’t get free babysitting?

              Dude, this thread is not going well for you.

              1. No, no, you stupid cosmo. He cut their uncle out of their lives because the uncle was afraid he might cut him out of their lives? See the difference? He ain’t no homophopbe, he got plenty of faggot friends.

              2. Now that’s funny.

        2. And what lessons would those be? Please, elaborate.

          Government is what we do together. (Don’t) Do unto others as you would (not) have them do unto you. Two wrongs don’t make a right.

          Where else would I need to go with this? Do all of you other libertarians just let kids fight each other while saying “They aren’t my property!” is that somehow better? Or do you pull a Warty and say that God is stupid but fighting is wrong because I say so?

          1. Two wrongs don’t make a right.

            Yet that seems to be your exact system?

            1. I learned it from Epi, if someone harasses you, throw a coke bottle at their head and run away as fast as you can.

              1. RC Dean threw the coke bottle. You illiterate.

                1. Oh no! My lesson about two wrongs making a right is completely undone because I confused surface snow and a coke bottle.

                  1. No, your “lesson” is undone because it’s completely retarded and incoherent. You do realize you can’t even string together a sentence that makes sense, right? Of course you don’t.

          2. What on earth are you babbling about? Is raving like a lunatic your preferred response to everything? Is your mind actually this incoherent? It sure as fuck seems like it.

          3. So you had your children. Beat. Each. Other. Is this true or false?

          4. I let my kids fight until they get it out of their system. If they’re making too much noise, I tell them to take it someone else. Once they’re done fighting they usually turn on the Wii and play some SSBB.

            1. No cawing about somebody cheating or playing SSBB unfairly? Adding rules and taking turns even fucks up the SSBB.

              1. Uh, what? They always complain about the other cheating when they lose a round. I don’t know what the bit about rules and turns is supposed to mean.

  16. Remembering back when I was in elementary, those first years, it was rough those years. Back then, there wasn’t any junior high school. We first graders were in the same building and on the same playground as 8th graders.

    There were bullies on the playground and pretty much zero defense against them. They would constantly harass us little guys and were very apparently getting much sadistic enjoyment out of it. We were terrorized constantly. They would take our lunch money at least once a week as protection money.

    I remember one time that me and my 2 closest buds decided to stand up to them. We had lured one of them off by himself and I took a position standing on the end of the big slide where I was going to jump on him from behind and then my friends were going to attack. This went quite badly, because just as I was about to pounce, some stupid girl came down the slide and knocked me off, i landed belly down on the ground and the wind was knocked from me. Then all 3 of us got beaten up pretty badly by this 8th grader twice our size.

    I wouldn’t trade that experience for what the kids are facing today. We were basically living in a libertopia compared to now. What kids are living in today is a nightmare compared to that.

    1. One of my friend’s older brothers (well, several of them, but a particular one in this case) was a total nightmare and would terrorize us constantly. So we got sick of it and one snowy day after school while waiting for a late bus we decided to fuck with him. He was walking down a hill from us with some buddies and we decided to wing a frozen chunk of surface snow (the snow that crusts on the surface of a several inches of snow) at him as an ambush. However, we intended it to smash near him, because actually hitting him was–we thought–a death sentence.

      So we wing the thing, and we’re already giggling and laughing, ha ha, and then…it was a perfect throw. It whanged him *right in the head*, perfect shot. That’s when we started running.

      They caught us right in front of one of the more pathetic teachers. She huffed and puffed while they kicked our legs out from under us and wailed on us a bit. I suppose her presence probably saved us a little bit of a beating, though.

      Lesson learned: if you’re going to fuck with someone, make sure you incapacitate them long enough to get away properly.

      1. A group of bullyish kids (pretty much my age) followed me into a park near our elementary school. I don’t remember exactly what happened, but there was a convenient coke bottle on the ground which I picked up and winged at them.

        Got one of them right on the noggin. I made my escape, no problem. “If you are going to strike at the king . . . .”

    2. People always think I made this up, but I really thought this was how dodgeball was played until I was in high school.

      You line about a dozen 2nd and 3rd graders with their back up against a brick wall. A 6th grader, hopefully the biggest one they could find, would throw a basketball at their face from about 15 feet away. You could dodge, but not move your feet. The game was over when the bell rang or all 12 had been hit and/or slammed up against the brick wall.

      It never became your turn to throw until you were in 6th grade.

      1. We had 7th through Seniors on our tennis team. We played something called Battle Ball. The upper classmen would be on one side of the net and everyone else on the other side. You got 3 hits to set up an overhead. If by some chance the underclassmen ever got in a position to return it, you could pull out an extra ball and hit it at them.

        The best moment ever was when we were underclassmen and we actually had a chance to hit an upperclassman only to have a lefty barge in for the overhead and accidently break the nose of another kid. While the poor kid who had just gotten cracked across the bridge of his nose with a racquet gushed blood on the court, the upperclassmen were screaming at him to write his name in blood because it would be cool.

    3. This went quite badly, because just as I was about to pounce, some stupid girl came down the slide and knocked me off,

      It was Nicole, wasn’t it? Because that’s totally her style.

      1. Well, it was hard to tell when I was on the ground with the wind knocked out while my friends were being roughed up while yelling ‘uncle!’ over and over again. Yeah, that was a real thing, it was your only hope that they’d finally stop.

        And I’m just lying there waiting my turn.

    4. This does not sound like a real improvement over today’s problems. The solution to fun-sucking structure is not out-of-control bullying.

  17. You know who else wanted children’s activities strictly supervised?

    1. Santa?

    2. Yeah but Hitler let them do what they wanted to, as long as they wore their armband and swore fealty to der fuhrer.

  18. I always thought recess was one of those fables that didn’t exist in real life. My tiny school had just a tiny front lawn and no playground, so no recess.

    1. Recess was real and it was spectacular!

      1. Indeed, the glory was real.

        1. I remember when it started to change from girls being an alien form of life who we guys stayed away from for fear of getting the dreaded ‘cooties’ to noticing that there was something pleasingly, quite fascinatingly different about them. 8th grade girls on the playground, what a wonderful time for a 6th grader…

          1. I think it was 5th or 6th grade, me and a couple other guys would try to get the girls to chase us. We’d flatter them by calling them fatsos or booger heads then let the fun begin.

            1. COOTIES!

              1. Look, when you go to an elementary school with a herpes infection rate of 85%, cooties is a real thing.

                1. Back then, as far as I can remember, herpes was not even a word. I know that STDs were a thing then, just that it wasn’t anything you ever heard about in a school.

            2. Calling a girl fatso or booger head today will probably get you on a list for life.

          2. Hyperion-

            In my school distict, we were the first 6th grade class on the swich to “middle” schools (6-8 grade) from “elementary” schools (1-6 grades) and Jr High (7-9).

            We had a thing called “boobie bouncing”,

            Walking down the hall, two of your guys would shove you at the the hot chick walking towards you.

            An “A” was getting a getting a total faceplant right in the tittie. A “B” was the accidental hand grab trying to stop yourself.

            Nothing else was acceptable…

    2. I remember 1st grade (1971), We had the swings that the seats were just painted boards with a slippery varnish on top. So, when I jumped from as high as possible and landed wrong on the gravel playground, I shredded my elbow. I’m literally dripping blood in class- and the teacher simply said, “Go get a paper towel from the restroom”.

      We need more of this…

  19. When I was in grade school, the teachers didn’t like it when we got blood on school property.

    1. ^This^

      Don’t fall and split your knee open or you’ll get in trouble. If you do, press dirt into the wound so it clots quicker and you don’t get in trouble.

  20. . . . most young people enjoy sixteen years of creative, unstructured free time in school . . .

    Were you held back a few grades Mr. Soave?

    1. Sixteen years includes college, these days, amirite?

      1. Isn’t that about 20 these days?

        You get Pre-K, Kindergarten, Grades 1- 12, and 5-6 to finish your Bachelors degree…

  21. It scares me more to think of what these kids will do once they get out of college. I wonder what kind of government reforms they will call for once they realize that life outside of school is completely unstructured. I’m a millennial, and I notice that my most socially and professionally-underdeveloped peers happen to also live with their parents/have their bills paid by their parents.

    Interestingly, though, these same people love to go to the most wild unstructured parties. They despise authority (like the police), but they call for increased government programs regarding career placement and wage regulation. Its almost like they like they crave the unstructured playtime (partying, drugs, alcohol), but they hate the unstructured nature of finding a job/deciding career/developing a financial plan.

    1. Soon we’ll be in Huxley’s Brave New World and they’ll have the utopia they seek.

  22. Maybe we should think twice about making recess as joyless and authoritarian as the rest of the school day.

    I’m pretty sure I would have cut class and maybe even dropped out if I’d had to put up with this hyper nannying bullshit. There were times that recess was the only part of the school day I looked forward to (and other times when there were no parts of the school day I looked forward – God I hate bullies).

  23. Since most of these shooting incidents are being carried out by young guys who seemingly haven’t been alive long enough to be on the receiving end of life’s buggy whip (1. you don’t get everything you want, 2. life is unfair and 3. sometimes society and people are down right mean to you) to have ground them down, have any of the so-called “experts” thought that maybe, just maybe with all the Zero-Tolerance Policies, Structured Play Time, Safe Spaces and Trigger Warnings that kids are subjected to by parents and society that they are creating generations of emotional cripples who are bereft of any capacity to deal with life making them pissed off?

  24. Note the conflict between what is said:

    Playworks claims that it doesn’t take control of kids’ recess time; it just provides safe, inclusive activities for students who have trouble making friends and participating in recess on their own.

    And what is done:

    A recess coach explained that wasn’t a choice at the time

  25. This seems like a decent place to leave this. Not surprising that the Finns are better at this.

    1. Early childhood indoctrination. Nothing is more important.

  26. Is there a war on childhood?
    Generally, Yes; but specifically, On Boys!

  27. The headline and sub head, Schools Hire Consultants to Make Recess Safe, Structured, Sad
    Is there a war on childhood?, pose a most interesting question.They also provide what might well be a most unhappy answer, that being as follows. Yes, there is a war on childhood, one that the children seem to be loosing.

  28. I cannot remember where I read it, but there was a school system in New Zealand that let kids be kids at recess time and it turned out that they did better in school. Also, there was (is) a place in England or Wales that has an no-adults playground. (There are adults who do supervise by making sure no one is seriously harming anyone.) It is a muddy place (when it rains), full of tree limbs and trees, and junk, yes, junk. And the kids are able to make fires, among other things. It helps them to learn about themselves and their environment and helps them to make better choices in life. Kids, in order to become good adults, need to be free of constant adult supervision.

  29. I make up to $90 an hour working from my home. My story is that I quit working at Walmart to work online and with a little effort I easily bring in around $40h to $86h? Someone was good to me by sharing this link with me, so now i am hoping i could help someone else out there by sharing this link… Try it, you won’t regret it!……

    http://www.HomeJobs90.Com

  30. I make up to $90 an hour working from my home. My story is that I quit working at Walmart to work online and with a little effort I easily bring in around $40h to $86h? Someone was good to me by sharing this link with me, so now i am hoping i could help someone else out there by sharing this link… Try it, you won’t regret it!……

    http://www.HomeJobs90.Com

Please to post comments

Comments are closed.