Student Loans

A Lannister Always Pays His Student Loans, and So Should You

Lee Siegel, cretin

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Secretary of Education Arne Duncan announced a new wave of loan debt forgiveness Monday for students who attended Corinthian College, a much-maligned for-profit college company that declared bankruptcy after the government took an interest in its fraudulent practices.

It's easy to sympathize with the people—often low-income people—who were seduced by the promise of easy degrees that would yield higher-paying careers and took on massive debt in pursuit of that goal. Does that mean the government should bail them out—at a substantial cost (as much as $3.5 billion) to taxpayers? The New York Times spells out the arguments for and against:

Lauren Asher, president of the Institute for College Access and Success, praised the department's move. "It's important and it's new, and it means the department is recognizing that students defrauded by Corinthian and other unscrupulous for-profit colleges deserve relief."

But not everyone praised the plan.

"Students have been hurt, but the department is establishing a precedent that puts taxpayers on the hook for what a college may have done," said Senator Lamar Alexander, Republican of Tennessee, and chairman of the Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee.

"This is one more reason it was a bad idea to make the U.S. Department of Education the banker for students as well as the regulator of their colleges," he continued. "If your car is a lemon you don't sue the bank that made the auto loan; you sue the car company."

Given that the federal government already plays such a paramount role in the funding of higher education, I can understand why the Obama administration would reach this decision. But Alexander's criticism is spot-on: Why should taxpayers be punished for the mistakes of college debtors, even ones who truly were deceived?

A far-less sympathetic debtor, writer Lee Siegel, penned a Times op-ed a few days earlier tackling the same subject. But never mind forgiveness, or deceitful colleges: Spiegel advocates refusing to pay back loan debt willfully accrued in the course of attending elite colleges. This, in fact, is precisely what he did:

Years later, I found myself confronted with a choice that too many people have had to and will have to face. I could give up what had become my vocation (in my case, being a writer) and take a job that I didn't want in order to repay the huge debt I had accumulated in college and graduate school. Or I could take what I had been led to believe was both the morally and legally reprehensible step of defaulting on my student loans, which was the only way I could survive without wasting my life in a job that had nothing to do with my particular usefulness to society.

I chose life. That is to say, I defaulted on my student loans.

As difficult as it has been, I've never looked back. The millions of young people today, who collectively owe over $1 trillion in loans, may want to consider my example.

It struck me as absurd that one could amass crippling debt as a result, not of drug addiction or reckless borrowing and spending, but of going to college. Having opened a new life to me beyond my modest origins, the education system was now going to call in its chits and prevent me from pursuing that new life, simply because I had the misfortune of coming from modest origins.

Siegel's op-ed has drawn considerable outrage—all of it deserved. The Washington Free Beacon called him a "sociopath." Slate's Jordan Weisssmann lamented that his advice was financially ruinous:

But tone-deafness is the least of Siegel's sins, in this case. The much bigger problem, and the reason the Times owes the world a mea culpa in my opinion, is that he spends about a third of the column dispatching criminally negligent financial advice. …

Astoundingly, Siegel never mentions, nor demonstrates that he understands, the fact that in most cases of default the government can simply start garnishing up to 15 percent of borrowers' disposable wages directly from their paychecks. That's more than the 10 percent they would owe if they simply signed up for the newest income-based repayment plan that the Department of Education offers. In other words, unless you're making a political statement like the debt strikers, there is virtually no rational reason to default.

Nevertheless, Siegel wonders if more debtors should follow his lead and refuse to repay the government (i.e., us). Deeply selfish thinking undergirds this philosophy, which amounts to little more than "I want a pony!" when stripped of its liberal pretensions about the intangible worth of a college education. The reason student loan debt is not generally dischargeable through bankruptcy is because college students are a risky investment—far riskier than the people who typically qualify for bank loans. Many students who attend college on a loan don't graduate. Others graduate but don't find jobs that draw salaries to justify the expense. Many default. The correlation between attending college—an increasingly expensive proposition—and becoming a highly-compensated, stable, successful individual is still strong, but by no means automatic.

College should be more affordable—and it would be more affordable if the government wasn't obscuring the true, hideous cost by paying it upfront and sticking students with the bill later. Refusing to pay back the loans is not a serious solution to this problem, and is extremely harmful to both debtors and taxpayers.

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    1. The girl with the glass slippers was Cinderella!!!

    2. The valonqar is not Tyrion.

    3. Tyrene has a lovely rack.

      1. Tyene. And yes, she does.

  1. It’s easy to sympathize with the people?often low-income people?who were seduced by the promise of easy degrees that would yield higher-paying careers and took on massive debt in pursuit of that goal.

    So… college.

    1. That’s pretty much what I was thinking: doesn’t that describe most college students? Except maybe the ones whose parents were rich enough to pay for everything.

    2. This is what I did, exactly… but at a 4 year university- and then for graduate school. WTF america- am I getting punished in relation because I chose a different type of school?

      1. Well, that and for being moral enough to keep your word.

  2. You know who else wanted to default on their financial obligations to others?

    1. Congress?

    2. Does his name sound like a case of the hicoughs?

      “Greek Proposal on Bailout Standoff Not Acceptable, European Officials Say”
      […]
      “That’s nonnegotiable,” an EU official said. “What’s been submitted is not a basis for further political discussion.”
      http://www.wsj.com/articles/eu…..&mg=id-wsj

    3. Syriza, Syriza, who thinks money grows on trees-a?

    4. Populace of Athens before Solonian reforms?

    5. The US government?

    6. American Socialist?

  3. …after the government took an interest in its fraudulent practices.

    As opposed to every other university? I mean, useless electives and bloated administration. You are too judgmental, Rico. Or not enough; I can’t tell.

  4. reckless borrowing and spending, but of going to college.

    Wait… WHAT?

    How is racking up crushing amounts of debt to go into a dodgy ‘creative industry’ job not a form of reckless borrowing and spending?

    When are we finally going to see yuppies who overextended themselves on a home with beautiful hardwoods in a hip, walkable neighborhood and people who go to elite colleges for creative-job degrees as being cut from the exact same cloth?

    1. Maybe sometime after the higher education bubble bursts?

    2. Hey, now. At least the house can be resold, it’s not a complete waste.

    3. I was about to make the same point.

      It seems that buyer beware is just another victim-blaming slogan nowadays …

    4. I wanted to play professional baseball. I borrowed a couple hundred thousand dollars to spending on a few years of training to play pro ball, so obviously I deserve to go to the major leagues regardless of whether any of the teams are actually willing to pay me.

      As it turns out, none of them were willing to pay me to play baseball. But I still have all these loans to pay off. No fair!!! Greedy bankkks trying to screw over a pauper like me! Government has to pay my loans and pay me to play baseball! Waaaaah! Waaaah!

  5. “[…]I chose life. That is to say, I defaulted on my student loans.[…]”

    Yeah, right.

    1. Hey Siegel! YOU’RE FUCKING NOT WELCOME!

      1. But he chose LIFE!
        Slimy pos….

        1. Trainspotting was never meant to be a person’s moral code.

        2. He manages to avoid the fact that the life he chose was made possible by borrowing money, too.

          1. I believe stealing is the word you’re looking for and not borrowing.

    2. Well, if he chose life, cannot that be what he’s given?

      I mean, a jury of taxpayers would probably agree with that, right?

  6. Lee Siegel, a highly educated stupid asshat.

  7. The Iron Bank of Braavos would not approve of defaulting on your student loans.

    1. Hopefully a Faceless Man makes a visit to Lee Siegel.

      1. Subpoena inbound.

        1. Sonofa-

      2. “I am so sorry.”

    2. Nor would the baby eating Bishop of Bath and Wells.

      1. Do you have any children, Lee Siegal?

  8. “I want a pony!”

    No, it’s “I want a $100 dollar bill-encrusted pony!”

    1. I highly recommend picking up at least 1 100 Trillion Zimbabwe Dollar bill. It’s only about $30 US, and is available via Amazon http://www.amazon.com/Zimbabwe…..FGQ3GYRS8E

      1. Okay, I found this pretty funny and I ordered two. If you’re a spambot, you’re pretty good.

  9. Corinthian liquidates, the pansies keep their shitty degrees, and taxpayers get the bill.

    This is a test-case for student-loan handouts – a voracious special-interest has quietly been born.

    YES WE CAN!

    1. How many employers are going to take a Corinthian College degree seriously, though? Most of these for-profit diploma mills have high costs and shitty reputations in the real world.

      So for these idiots, it’s a no-win situation–they’ll get out from under the debt, but now they have an essentially worthless piece of paper that few employers will take seriously. So they’ll have to go back to school and do the whole stupid process over again, and likely come out once again with just as much debt as they had before.

      1. “So they’ll have to go back to school and do the whole stupid process over again, and likely come out once again with just as much debt as they had before.”

        I have it on good authority that Mc Donalds will soon be paying ~$15/hr for entry level positions.. No collage required, earn while you learn..

        1. “I have it on good authority that Mc Donalds will soon be paying ~$15/hr for entry level positions.. No collage required, earn while you learn.”

          Unfortunately, they have quit hiring, and the burgers are now $8 each, so…

      2. How many employers are going to take a Corinthian College degree seriously, though?

        Just one: GOVERNMENT.

  10. It’s easy to sympathize with the people?often low-income people?who were seduced by the promise of easy degrees that would yield higher-paying careers and took on massive debt in pursuit of that goal.

    It’s easy for whom? I mean, if you’re going to speak for me, you should at least tell everyone my favorite color, Robby.

    1. Your favorite color is red ass, isn’t it?

      And rightfully so.

      1. I was going to say “green,” but I like your answer better.

        1. “I’ll bet you’re the kind of guy that wouldn’t even offer a reacharound, Rico! I’ll be watchin’ you!”

          1. +9000

      2. Pink…no wait, blue!

        Aieeeeeeeeeeeer

  11. An Ivy League degree is every bit as much of a status symbol as a McMansion. This guy should have thought harder. That said, the more people default on their loans, the quicker the college bubble will pop, so maybe he’s accidentally the good guy here.

    1. I really agree here. He might be the Pets.com of the Higher Education Bubble.

      1. I saw his interview. He’s about as smarmy and as smug as that fucking sock-puppet that shilled for Pets.com. Probably twice as smart, too. The sock puppet I mean.

    2. Actually that would be an interesting way out – if you default on a student loan, you lose the sheepskin and will be prosecuted for fraud if you claim to be college graduate.

    3. See my comment above. It’s exactly a status/lifestyle symbol. I’m no less pissed about bailed-out home loan defaulters who got to at least live in their swanky homes than I am about bailed out elite university defaulters who get to keep their snooty degree and the potential earnings that come with it.

      At least the homeowner eventually loses the home. What did Siegel lose?

      1. Apparently not his dignity.

        1. It’s not right but it’s okay
          He ain’t got no digni-tay

    4. the quicker the college bubble will pop

      Speaking from the inside, the bubble has already popped. Well, it’s more of a slow leak…but it’s happening. Every couple of months you hear of some small private liberal arts college folding. When all is said and done, the only ones left standing will be the large private research universities, the public flagships, and the handful of successful on-line/hybrid schools. I would add trade schools to that list, but I don’t think Americans are going to wake up soon enough, Mike Rowe’s work nonwithstanding.

      That having been said, college is not going to become more affordable until general inflation is dealt with as well.

      1. large private research universities

        I AM INVINCIBLE

        1. There’s invincible, and then there’s Harvard even if all the students were vaporized we’d still make a net profit merely on the interest from our endowment invincible.

          1. I believe Princeton has kicked around the idea of not charging students tuition because they have more endowment money than they know what to do with. The elite endowments are ridiculous.

            1. Can you imagine an Institute for Advanced Study, but for students? You can just hang out as long as you want and study what you want until you eventually build up enough credits to earn a degree in something?

              Oh, wait, that’s just Europe.

              1. “Interdisciplinary Studies”

            2. It’s amazing what wealthy Republicans have done for Harvard and Princeton.

      2. So in other words, college is just experiencing the old pattern in which: government overregulates industry, driving up costs; consumers complain; government imposes (usually veiled) price controls; industry falters, all except for the Big Few go under; even they, however, eventually, collapse, and because they now are the industry, government has to step in, bail out/subsidize industry, and now, industry is basically just an unofficial (perfectly mismanaged) government agency.

        Just like the banking, airline, and auto industries. And soon to be cable/internet provision.

    5. In the meantime, those suckers who actually, like, pay off their debts have to pay higher interest rates because people like him default on their loans, thereby increasing the risk associated with these loans.

      And some people who might have actually been able to pay off their debts won’t be able to get loans at all, and so are effectively denied an education by little twats like Lee.

  12. Based on the fact that (as Robby points out) you are better off with the 10% income-based repayment plan than a 15% wage garnishment, I’m thinking that Siegel is either 1) trying to start a revolution, or 2) trying to surround himself with the warm blanket of other people making the same idiotic mistake he realized he has made.

    1. He’s probably trying to start a revolution or some such horseshit. He strikes me as the kind of leftist twat who might actually think that way. What an asshat.

      1. Well, he does think that if everybody defaults on their student loans, the government will have NO CHOICE but to impose a new tax that will make ponies – I mean, college – free for everyone. So yeah, it’s kind of a vision of himself as the spark that will lead the way to free ponies – dammit, I keep saying that, I mean college – for everyone. Because we deserve it, don’cha know.

        It apparently has not occurred to him that another possibility is that people’s willingness to extend student loans would dry up, or that lenders would start requiring real, repossessable collateral for student loans.

    2. ” or 2) trying to surround himself with the warm blanket of other people making the same idiotic mistake he realized he has made.”

      When everybody’s guilty.. nobody’s guilty..

    3. The income contingent repayment option was probably not available when Siegel first entered repayment. Apparently, he took out his loans over 30 years ago. ICR sure as hell wasn’t an option when I graduated in the late 80s, so I simply got on with the task of repaying my frackin’ loans.

      Siegel, you’re a fucking douche.

  13. I’d suggest that we start reforms by not giving out massive amounts of non-secured loans to anyone who wants to purchase a useless credential.

  14. IDK ? How about instead of a taxpayer bailout “The Government” prosecutes Corinthian for fraud in order to give back the money that was stolen from the students ?

    1. “a much-maligned for-profit college company that declared bankruptcy after the government took an interest in its fraudulent practices.”

      Am I missing anything here ?

      1. That’s the other side of this that people seem to be ignoring. How come the people who ran this company aren’t being hauled before a grand jury?

        1. I imagine fraud would be hard to prove. How do you prove that I didn’t teach you well, as opposed to you just weren’t able to understand the material?

        2. ” How come the people who ran this company aren’t being hauled before a grand jury?”

          They docket’s full of internet rabble-rousers and malcontents.. Resources are stretched too thin, and budgets are just too meager..

        3. The government is too busy twisting ill-wishes upon a shitty judge into personal threats to be bothered by this.

  15. Sure, let’s bail out everyone in the same situation and then prospective students don’t have to worry what the financial or educational status of their college choice is. Instead of worrying about bills or hitting the books, they can protest triggers and carry mattresses on their backs.

  16. It would be just about the greatest thing of all time if the commie-run universities ended up planting the seeds of their own destruction because they created too many entitled left-wing scumbags like Siegel. Kind of like the education version of Skynet.

    1. Well, at least Skynet eventually became self aware

      1. *rimshot*

      2. Lol, sublime.

  17. Talking about debt repayment obligations, Mark Twain, who went bust thanks to some poor investments, repaid his pre-discharge creditors despite having legally discharged his debts to them in bankruptcy. When do you ever hear about anyone doing that today?

    1. I had heard that. I wonder how much he owed, adjusted for inflation?

      1. Must’ve been quite a bit–he was wealthy before he went under. Working from memory, but I believe he went on the lecture circuit and started writing his travelogues as a result. And got stinkin’ rich again.

  18. It struck me as absurd that one could amass crippling debt as a result, not of drug addiction or reckless borrowing and spending, but of going to college.

    This was my favorite line by far, for it’s absurdity and outright parroting of elitist bullshit. Sorry, Lee, but your college education was?by your own admission throughout your op-ed?at least as reckless as many drug addictions, and more harmful than many. There are plenty of longtime drug users who have never stolen money to feed their habit. And, bonus, most of them don’t pat themselves on the back about how they are just too valuable to society not to lie, cheat, and steal.

    1. Look at it this way–what if you took the money you spent on college and used it instead to start a business, or even just invested it in the market? Compare the lifetime likely returns on all of those expenditures.

      I say this as someone who firmly believes that most people should pursue a college-level education. My problem isn’t with college per se, but by the massively and absurdly distorted “market” for higher education. Get the government out of it, and college education or the equivalent should be generally affordable by all.

      1. I say this as someone who firmly believes that most people should pursue a college-level education.

        I dunno about this. When I was in college [counts fingers, takes off shoes, counts toes, erm] call it 30 years ago, I distinctly recall thinking that most of the people there had no business being in college, as they obviously had no interest in or aptitude for the class work.

        1. I guess my point is that I think it would be nice if people were better read and pursued greater knowledge than what their careers require of them, which college is a very rough and poor proxy for accomplishing. Obviously, I speak of a cultural “nice to have,” and not of social engineering programs or anything at all involving government interference.

          Many of my farmer ancestors in the before times were extraordinary well-read and well-written.

    2. What’s particularly stupid is saying that you amass crippling debt as the result of going to college.

      No, you idiot. You don’t go into debt because you go to college. You go into debt because you borrow money.

      1. What’s stupid and absolutely true is how much students use that loan money for things totally unrelated to college. Using nondischargeable and not always cheap debt to fund stuff is not a smart move.

      2. “No, you idiot. You don’t go into debt because you go to college. You go into debt because you borrow money.”

        Picky, picky!

  19. Well shit, I have bombastic statements to make about the people wanting student debt forgiveness that I feel uncomfortable making now.

    This sucks.

    1. TRUE THREAT

      REPORTED

    2. Penn & Teller dealt with a parallel issue in wanting to avoid defamation suits with Bullshit by cussing a lot and going so over the top that no court in its right mind would ever be able to treat the statements as defamation.

      1. Whether or not that worked, I don’t know. Consult your legal adviser. Results may vary. Cussing should be avoided in states with sharia law.

        1. …oops

      2. Fucking A cocksucker bullshit motherfuckin’ prick asshole fuckin’ COOL! Shit!

        1. BARBARA STREISAND!!!!!!!

          1. BOB SAGET!

    3. Give in to your anger Jesse. Use your aggressive feelings boy, let the hate flow through you!

  20. The problem here is that we have another broken market, thanks to the feds.

    A rational market would allow students to borrow money from private lenders, who would be at risk for repayment (no federal purchase or guarantee of the loans), and could charge market interest rates and could even do some underwriting (that is, requirements on what degree programs their loan could pay for).

    Even better would be an option where the school participates in the loan, and the risk. You might be able to do this by having a lower interest rate if the school participates.

    Up front, we would have market discipline on how much is borrowed, at what rate, and for what degrees. That would get rid of most of the bubbly bits in the current higher ed market, I bet.

    These would be unsecured loans, subject to discharge in bankruptcy (thus, the risk taken by the lenders). I see no reason why the degree itself couldn’t have a lien on it, so that it can be repossessed if there is a default.

    1. Example after example after example of the destructive nature of government intervention in markets, yet it’s trumpeted as the solution just as frequently. When will we learn?

      1. When you can snatch your liberty from the palm of the hand of Lavrenty Beria before he clenches his fist.

    2. And this is even more obvious because college students clearly view a degree as a commodity–it’s something they invest tens of thousands of dollars in on the assumption that there will be a return on their investment. Why not treat it as such? It’s not like what they’re doing is any different than what someone buying stocks expects. But in the latter there’s the presumption that what you’re doing is risky and that you could lose your shirt if you invest poorly. That’s not the case with a degree. But treating student loans like a rational market would help to reorient people to current realities rather than a paradigm of what college was like 60 years ago.

      1. What was college like in the fall of 1955?

        1. There was a lot of khaki.

          1. And tweeds?

              1. Looks like the gal in the background approves!

    3. and could charge market interest rates and could even do some underwriting (that is, requirements on what degree programs their loan could pay for).

      And my cynical ass immediately sees where the feds would (re)intervene.

      Market interest rates for dodgy areas of education that weren’t likely to result in repayment viability would be high. The feds, determined to make sure that students of limited means could pursue their creative-industry degrees without the burden of high interest rates, would place regulations, rate caps and education mandates.

  21. Moral hazards, how do they work?

  22. That’s not reason student loans aren’t dischargeable in bankruptcy. That has never — as far as I am aware — EVER been used as a reason.

    Making student loans non-dischargeable was begun because of rumors newly-minted doctors and lawyers were running to BK court once they graduated. It first applied only to federal loans but was quietly expanded to all student loans.

    And there is no reason for it. Student loans aren’t any more risky than subprime mortgages and there’s no bar on shedding those poor decisions in bankruptcy court.

    You don’t want recent grads discharging their loans? Fine. Make them wait 10 years, when they may have jobs and families and bankruptcy would only be done out of desperation. But everybody deserves an ability to undo a financial mistake, including students.

  23. So THIS is what not getting a H/T is like. Glad to be in the esteemed club.

    AM Links


  24. Lee Siegel, cretin THIEF

    1. At least Tulpa never claimed to be wittier than me. How about you, HM?

      1. Tulpa has claimed to be witter than I am. Or was that Tony? Hard to keep them all straight.

        1. The southern district of New York is getting it all straight for you.

          1. Should I be worried about all the times I have posted that Mr. Booth should have done the job sooner?

    2. “[…]He resumed writing for The New Republic in April 2007.[8]”

      So, they said ‘naughty, naughty’ and nothing else happened.

      1. Yeah, I was gonna ask why this guy doesn’t shine shoes for a living now. But who the hell am I kidding, being a narcissistic pathological liar is probably considered a credential at the New Republic.

  25. without wasting my life in a job that had nothing to do with my particular usefulness to society

    Yeah, thank God he avoided that fate.

    1. The funny/sad thing is that he thinks he’s the only one who can judge what’s useful to society. I would say that if people will pay more for a shoe salesman than they will for a newly-minted BA in philosophy, that’s a pretty good indication that they think shoe salesmen are more useful.

      Oh yeah, and as some people have mentioned, TS Eliot was working at a bank when he wrote The Waste Land, Einstein wrote numerous scientific papers while working at the patent office, and Eric Hoffer wrote several books of philosophy while working as a longshoreman. So fuck this guy for his hoity-toity “oh, I couldn’t possibly work at a regular job, the world needs my unique talents too much” act.

  26. Elizabeth Warren’s CFPB, asleep at the wheel.

  27. Scumbags gonna scumbag……

  28. shorter Siegel: you fucked up. you trusted us.

  29. I don’t believe anyone should take advice from a Lannister because they have sex with their siblings and that’s gross, but they do pay their debts.

    1. Stop lying to yourself. If your sister were Lena Heady, you’d fuck her in a heartbeat.

  30. So basically, this guy read Crime & Punishment and decided Raskolnikov was a heroic character to be emulated.

  31. All of this is protecting the cartel until they apply the same standards to the not for profit (hah!) universities. DBs.

  32. “Students have been hurt, but the department is establishing a precedent that puts taxpayers on the hook for what a college may have done,”

    The point is to pump money into the monasteries of the Progressive Theocracy, and the taxpayers have deeper pockets than freshly graduated students.

    The *goal* is to make taxpayers ever more on the hook for subsidizing the Progressive Theocracy.

  33. For those of us who don’t spend our lives watching TV…Would you mind telling me what a “Lannister” is?

    1. I conveniently just watched all five seasons of game of thrones for free (illegally) on the internet this past week or so. The Lannisters are basically the Habsburgs of the Game of Thrones universe, only with even more royal incest and child murdering. And their family motto is “A Lannister always pays his debts.” Which may apply to to paying actual monetary debts, but more often it means “if we don’t like you we will kill you.” Like the Habsburgs.

  34. I disagree. More people should default. Why is this the only debt that can’t be forgiven in bankruptcy? The real answer of course is that universities should be the lender. They should be on the hook for the quality of their product and their choice of debtors. Of course RACISM when you deny the mess economically gifted.

  35. Not everyone can afford to go to college. We can’t afford to have everyone go to college. Now if only it was possible to have a decent life without going to college (or some other post-2ndary education) we would be set. Frankly speaking, for me the worst fact is that when young people apply for student loan they think that it’s a guarantee of successful career and great life. When I was in college my financial situation was very difficult and I had to visit Payday Loans Online Service but I got loan only in emergency and this prevented me to get in debt.

  36. Most of the time, college fees are ridiculously high and no wonder, students can’t handle them, even in future, when they’ve got a job or so. May be, students could just use their student loans not for its direct purpose. And sometimes some of your good budgeting skills aren’t enough to pay for your tuition. Therefore, most of students have part-time jobs to somehow make ends, but oftentimes this is not enough for covering their needs. Fortunately, every student can get uk loans direct online at shortest terms.

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