Rape

Why Did Rolling Stone Writer Choose UVA, Not Vanderbilt, for Gang Rape Exposé?

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Vandy
Public Domain

A jury convicted two former Vanderbilt University football players—Brandon Vandenburg and Cory Batey—of gang raping a female student during a night of heavy drinking and drug use. Authorities had plenty of graphic evidence to make their case, including photos, videos, and damning testimony. A snapshot, from the Associated Press:

Testimony showed Vandenburg passed out condoms to the other players, slapped her buttocks and said he couldn't have sex with the woman because he was high on cocaine.

Batey raped the woman and urinated on her, prosecutors said. His attorneys argued the images didn't show that.

Defense lawyers argued that Vandenburg and Batey were too drunk to know what they were doing and that a college culture of binge drinking and promiscuous sex should be partly to blame. …

Rumors about what happened quickly spread around campus, and the assault might have gone unnoticed had the university not stumbled onto the closed-circuit TV images several days later in an unrelated attempt to learn who damaged a dormitory door. The images showed players carrying an unconscious woman into an elevator and down a hallway, taking compromising pictures of her and then dragging her into the room.

It's telling that the perpetrators couldn't muster a better defense than drinking culture made us do it! Culture doesn't commit crime—individuals do. And the evidence that these young men behaved like animals and deserve prison is overwhelming.

But, while the culture argument is no defense whatsoever of their actions, and does not reduce their responsibility or culpability one iota, it is true that substance abuse played a role in the attack. At the very least, it was the tool by which Batey and Vandenburg perpetrated the crime, since the victim was incapacitated from drinking while it occurred. Such is often the case when rape disputes arise, which is why any productive discussion about reducing campus sexual assault must be intertwined with a discussion about the complete failure of national drug and alcohol policies.

Incidentally, I've seen some people hold up the Vandy case as if it somehow lessens the wrongness of Sabrina Rubin Erdely's debunked University of Virginia rape story. The UVA gang rape might not have happened, they say, but there's no reason it couldn't have happened—look at Vandy! This response is, in a word, wrong. UVA skeptics did not reach the conclusion that Jackie's allegations were unbelievable because she suffered a gang rape. Of course gang rapes happen on campus; there are numerous examples. What distinguished the UVA story from anything else ever reported was that the assault did not involve drugs or alcohol, required elaborate planning, and involved so many people that the perps could not have reasonably expected to get away with it—a confluence of factors that caused the allegations to have substantially more in common with ones that ultimately proved to be false, like the Duke lacrosse case and Tawana Brawley incident.

On a related note, the convictions of Batey and Vandenburg have prompted several writers to ask variations of this question, best summarized by Richard Bradley in a recent post—why didn't Erdely choose Vanderbilt for her gang rape story instead of UVA? Bradley writes:

The rape for which two Vanderbilt students (they're always referred to as football players, though I have no idea if that's relevant or just convenient) were just convicted is plenty horrific. And it has, from a crusading journalist's perspective, the advantage of being true. Is Vanderbilt just not as sexy a story as UVa?

I think I have an answer: At the end of the day, UVA's incredible story fit Erdely's narrative better than Vanderbilt's credible one. Erdely wanted to tell the story of a campus body and university administration behaving indifferently to an unspeakable crime. That's not what happened at Vandy: The students were expelled, convicted in criminal court, and now face lengthy prison sentences. The system does not always deliver justice to victims—or fairness to the accused—but in this case, it largely did.

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  1. Duke: The lights are growing dim Otto. I know a life of crime has led me to this sorry fate, and yet, I blame society. Society made me what I am.

    Otto: That’s bullshit. You’re a white suburban punk just like me.

    Duke: Yeah, but it still hurts.

    1. Do you want me to check the trunk?

    2. Great reference!

  2. Gee, when there is an actual crime, the police will prosecute and the people who did it will go to jail. Who could have seen that coming.

    And yes, that is exactly why they choose UVA. This is not about rape. This is about pushing a narrative and making college campuses more hostile to men. What the retards who write for Rolling Stone think that will get them is unclear. But that is what they want.

    1. +1 Revolutionary Truth

    2. Jann Wenner is way worse than Nicole. Way. Worse.

      (the reference to him in Krakauer’s Into Thin Air made me dislike him intensely, and his magazine being a huge pile of shit is even more reason)

      1. What was the reference? I have never read that book.

        1. As a journalist, Krakauer went on a road trip with Wenner and a couple of his buddies.

          It’s the second paragraph, beginning with “Until i bumped into her…”

          1. What a no class douche bag.

            1. Yep. That passage just rubbed me the wrong way. Wenner is perfectly fine with his souped-up Harley and Gulfstream jet, but is clearly a socialist POS (i.e. hypocrite).

      2. Into Thin Air was an interesting read, but other witnesses of those events have called some of Krakauer’s claims into question. At this point I’m not sure who to believe. Maybe everyone got it wrong considering they were all oxygen starved at the time.

        I don’t remember references to Jan Wenner, though. Please jog my memory.

        1. There is no way to blame those events on just one person. The guides were physically impaired and either unable or unwilling to turn their clients around, the climbers (including Krakauer) were not being team players, there was lack of communication between teams, the logistics were all fucked up.

          Judging by the TV show Everest: Beyond the Limit, guiding has changed significantly since then, and more and more guides keep their top leadership at lower altitudes to make better decisions.

          1. Yeah, I’m just saying that the Russian guy and the guy who lost his hands (forget their names) have both said that some of the facts in Krakauer’s book are flat-out wrong. But I think everyone pretty much agrees that once you get above base camp you need to take sole responsibility for your own safety because everyone around you is going to be making mistakes in that environment.

            But reading books like Into Thin Air makes you realize just how amazing Reinhold Messner is. Dude solo’ed Everest… via a partially new route… without supplementary oxygen… in 1980. He’s the Michael Jordan of Mountaineering.

        2. Oh and if you liked Into Thin Air, then I highly recommend Snow in the Kingdom, by Ed Webster. The story is somewhat less dramatic, but still very engaging. The main reason to buy the hardcopy, though, is for full color photos. “Breathtaking” doesn’t even come close to describing them.

          1. I’ll check it out! (though I pretty much only buy digital books. But most of them include photos).

            I just saw a great documentary on K2 called “Siren of the Himalayas”.

            1. Oh, fair warning: Some of the pictures in Snow in the Kingdom are NSFL. Frostbite is a terrifying thing.

              1. Oh hell, I’ve watched enough docs and read enough books about mountaineering to have seen it all. The pics of Beck Weathers were the worst I’ve ever seen.

                1. Beck Weathers. That’s the dude who lost his hands (and other stuff), right?

            2. Trad Touching the Void sometime. It makes what the people in Into Thin Air went through look like summer camp.

              1. It makes what the people in Into Thin Air went through look like summer camp.

                Tell that to Beck Weathers. I think there’s a point where you can no longer compare the horribleness of experiences…

                1. Some guy,

                  There are experiences that at least at the time would seem a lot worse than death.

    3. What the retards who write for Rolling Stone think that will get them is unclear.

      Maybe this sounds paranoid, but at this point, I wouldn’t entirely dismiss the possibility that Rolling Stone, UVA and the administration (the Dept. of Education, in particular) were in cahoots.

      1. Clearly the evil UVA President wanted an excuse to get rid of the Greek System.

        1. And the administration gets the narrative it needs to shut down debate on it’s push to get rid of due process for the accused.

    4. There’s another inconvenient fact in this case: nobody is blaming the victim or excusing the rapists.

      It simply does not advance the “rape culture” narrative.

  3. “I think I have an answer: At the end of the day, UVA’s incredible story fit Erdely’s narrative better than Vanderbilt’s credible one.”

    I agree with this line of thought.

  4. That’s not what happened at Vandy: The students were expelled, convicted in criminal court, and now face lengthy prison sentences.

    And that’s what the vast majority of the “misogynists” skeptical of the UVA claims would want to happen to guys who actually raped a woman. You’ll note, in this case, there’s not even crickets.

    1. Shouldn’t all of us evil, misogynistic right wing knuckle draggers be defending these guys?

      Or maybe we are condemning them to cover up how much we really approve of what they did, or something.

      1. Shouldn’t all of us evil, misogynistic right wing knuckle draggers be defending these guys?

        You’d think, right?

        The funny thing is, the feminists seem even less interested in this story than the rest of us. Here’s a case of guys actually acting out sexually on women out of a sense of privilege and they aren’t all that interested.

        As you said above, it isn’t about rape. It’s about power.

      2. Or maybe we are condemning them to cover up how much we really approve of what they did, or something.

        That’s it. In reality we love these guys. (/s. I shouldn’t have to put that there, but here we are.)

  5. I live in the deep South (only about 2 hours or so from Nashville). I keep forgetting about this Vanderbilt story. ESPN would bring it up every few months or so, but no other major news source has been covering it.

    1. If you live 2 hours from Nashville you are not in the Deep South. You’re in the “Upper South.”

    2. I live 4 hours from Nashville and I live in the Midwest (St. Louis)

  6. Defense lawyers argued that Vandenburg and Batey were too drunk to know what they were doing and that a college culture of binge drinking and promiscuous sex should be partly to blame.

    How do those lawyers sleep at night?

    1. Everyone deserves a defense. They had to say something. They couldn’t just get up and say their client was guilty. Every client deserves a defense no matter how absurd it is.

      1. Yeah. Have some sort of defense. It may not fly, but that’s for the court to decide.

      2. I’m all for even the worst criminal asshole getting the best defense, but that usually takes form of trying to introduce reasonable doubt into the prosecution’s case.

        “Society is to blame” is the last act of desperation from a terrible attorney, especially when your clients are wealthy white kids.

        1. And it just eggs on these idiots who want to con people into believing in this bullshit “rape culture” that permeates America.

          1. I agree.

          2. Which could very well be why they chose that defense. Offer a defense that will fit the agenda of the prosecutors’ constituents and hope you’ll get some leniency to induce further co-operation.

        2. Sometimes. Other times it is the last act of desperation from an attorney with a really stupid and guilty client. These guys video taped raping this girl and sent the pics to their friends. They should have offered to plead. They had no defense.

          Maybe there could have been a better one, but I am not going to say that without knowing a lot more about this case.

          1. Maybe it’s a matter of the best defense being a good offense. If you can’t actually claim you’re client’s innocent, then focus attention away from the clients by pointing to some other alleged villainy, like “society.”

            1. In fact, Alan Dershowitz had a book entitled *The Best Defense,* much of which is about defending guilty clients.

            2. The client gets the final say in what the defense is. If these guys insisted on this being their defense, the lawyer had to argue it.

              1. A more likely scenario:

                CLIENT: “So, like, they have this video I took where me and some of my friends had sex with my unconscious girlfriend…”

                LAWYER: “Uh, huh, so I suppose we can rule out ‘my client was in the library studying at the time.’ How about attacking the campus culture?”

                1. My guess GKC is that the lawyers told them to plead guilty and the parents and defendants refused. This whole “we were a victim of the culture” just reeks of some parent who refuses to believe their snowflake turned out to be this depraved and stupid.

        3. Keep out the “Society is to blame” stuff. Could you make a case that they were not responsible for their actions because of alcohol intoxication?

          I’m not talking about a moral case, but a legal case?

          1. No. Being drunk doesn’t get you out of legal responsibility for your actions. It might get you out of a charge that requires premeditation, but not something like rape.

            1. I think I had a voluntary intoxication rape scenario as part of an essay question in my criminal law class as a 2L. Been a long time, but voluntary intoxication and crime is, for some reason, one of the things most burned into my brain from that class.

            2. They dug their own graves with the pics and video evidence.

        4. I wouldn’t say it’s a horrible attorney necessarily. He was working with what he had.

          If the facts are on your side, you bang the facts. If the law’s on your side, you bang the law. If neither one’s on your side, you bang the table. All he had was the table.

      3. And in cases like this I wonder if trying this type of defense actually hurts the criminal. When you are obviously guilty I feel like you will get a more lenient sentence if you just fess up, admit you’re messed up and need help, apologize profusely and then promise to do everything in your power to make up for what you’ve done.

        1. It does. They should have pled guilty and used it being a first offense and being drunk as mitigation. This is a common mistake defendemts and attornys make; taking a mitigation case and trying to use it as a factual defense. You wind up losing on the facts and destroying your mitigation case by refusing to take responsibility b

    2. On huge, comfy, piles of cash.

      1. It works for Hillary.

        1. Don’t you know the Clintons are (or were) dead broke?? All those mortgages, donchya know.

          1. Fortunately Hillary is a financial wizard, I mean, she turned $10,000 into $100,000 practically overnight in cattle futures.

            1. Hillary! is 10x better than that.

              Her “investment” was just $1000.

              However, her financial planning skills did not match her investment savvy. She said she was playing the futures market to fund her young daughter’s college education.

              It was actually textbook money laundering. She opened a futures account with Refco (which later became MF Global) that was managed by a guy named Red Bone. Old Red just happened to be connected with Tyson (as in Tyson Chicken, headquartered in Arkansas.) At market opening, Old Red would enter two offsetting orders; at close of markets, he’d close the two contracts, assign the profitable side to Hillary!, and the loser to Tyson. This is the only way Hillary! could have accomplished this feat.

    3. Money baths are surprisingly comfortable, I guess.

      1. The guy who waxes my plane needs to eat too.

    4. Hugh Akston: “How do those lawyers sleep at night?”

      Rainer Wolfcastle: “On top of a pile of money with many beautiful ladies.”

    5. How do those lawyers sleep at night?

      Booze isn’t only for raping, you know.

  7. Isn’t there an article somewhere of Erdely admitting she profiled different rape stories across the country?

    I swear I’m not projecting; I seem to remember Robby actually linking it.

    1. She did. She went around the country looking for the right story and the right victim. Apparently being an actual victim was not a requirement and seems to have been a negative.

  8. OT:

    Prison chaplain awarded $4 million in damages after NYPD officers ‘deliberately broke his leg’

    Christopher Graham from Brooklyn claims police broke his leg on purpose
    His left tibia and fibula were fractured and he underwent two surgeries
    Jury awarded the 51-year-old corrections department chaplain $3.95m
    Attack left Mr Graham suffering from post-traumatic arthritis

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/new…..e-leg.html

    ‘We review, in a variety of ways, all allegations of officer misconduct,’ Deputy Chief Kim Royster told the New York Daily News.
    ‘A [verdict in] a civil case does not constitute a finding or even evidence that an officer has engaged in any misconduct.’

    *sigh*

    1. They beat up the chaplain? This guy wasn’t an inmate but the Prison Chaplain? As in he worked there? WTF?

      1. Did you read the article? They guy’s story is that the cops ripped his dreadlocks out of his head, intentionally twisted his leg back and forth until it snapped, and continued to beat him after that.

        Yet there was no misconduct.

        1. He called the police to his house and they of course entered like a Congress of angry baboons. I thought the prison guards beat him up at work.

          1. He was in an argument with his wife who called the cops saying he hit her with the butt end of a machete, which he denies. Then the cops did what cops do. Thing is, if he wasn’t a chaplain I bet his case would have gone no where.

            1. Yes, and all of the charges placed against him were dropped. So he’s not been found guilty of any crime.

              Then’s this: “Nicholas Paolucci, a spokesman for Corporation Counsel, said the city is “evaluating all of our options for challenging the verdict.”

              Not only do they want to deny any wrongdoing, they want the courts to side with them.

            2. Thing is, if he wasn’t a chaplain I bet his case would have gone no where.

              Which brings to mind the question of how often the police must be doling out “punishments” like this to people who don’t have the recourse for justice someone in his position does.

              1. Which brings to mind the question of how often the police must be doling out “punishments” like this to people who don’t have the recourse for justice someone in his position does.

                It’s standard procedure.

    2. A [verdict in] a civil case does not constitute a finding or even evidence that an officer has engaged in any misconduct.

      He’s completely wrong about that, of course.

      A verdict in a civil case is the very definition of a finding of misconduct, and is actual, no kidding, introducible evidence in subsequent evidence in some circumstances.

      1. If they don’t admit to misconduct then there was no misconduct, because fuck you, that’s why.

      2. I thought criminal trials usually came first.

      3. Unless the standard for misconduct is beyond a reasonable doubt v

  9. I’ve read a number of articles on this case. This wasn’t a stranger rape or “let’s take home this random drunk girl.” The victim was Vandenberg’s girlfriend. He took her out drinking and after she was near blackout, he took back to his apartment and his three friends took turns raping her in every orifice while Vandenberg filmed it, giving direction and recording a running commentary. And the next morning, he used “taking care of her while she was drunk” to guilt her into having sex with him.

    Minus some of the implausible details, this is every bit as horrific as what “Jackie” said happened to her. But these shitbags were facing justice, so Rolling Stone yawned.

    1. Someone linked to an article wondering why it’s never the unambiguously awful cases that make the news. No, it’s always the cases that might have happened or might not have that become KULTUR WAR maypoles for the idiots to dance around.

      1. The choose close cases because the point is to divide people. IF they choose obvious cases, everyone would agree about it and they would be deprived of calling their enemies evil.

        There is no “rape culture” just like there is no “institutional racism” in this country. But their entire ideology and self image depends on their being. So, they pick cases that are close so that some people will take the other side. This allows them to pretend that the cases are obvious and the people who disagree are racists or think rape is okay.

  10. But these shitbags were facing justice, and anyway weren’t white frat boys so Rolling Stone yawned.

    1. A portion of them were white, they were football players and it was also a Southern college of gentility. This was perfect, except for the whole prosecution part.

      1. How dare they actually prosecute those rapists! You know they didn’t really want to.

      2. Yeah, I would have thought Vanderbilt was a nice juicy target for this.

      3. This is everything the Steubenville case was and more. It had everything EXCEPT for controversy. Nobody was on the shithead rapists’ side, as far as I can tell, which of course makes it unattractive for the Jezebel crowd. Rape doesn’t outrage them, “rape culture” does.

        1. Your last sentence completely nails it.

  11. This story had to have at least been a contender for Erdely: it met much of her criteria: Southern, Prestigious, White Perps (I assume, those are some really white sounding names at least)

    1. Brandenburg is white, the other 3 are not

      1. Oh…

        Obviously put it down the memory whole along with the gang rape at William Paterson.

        The blond whale is out there somewhere.

        1. What gets these people going isn’t the existence of rape itself, but when rape is supposedly not taken seriously, victims are shunned and blamed, etc. The UVA case, had it been real, would have been an example of a frat using rape as an initiation process, while the school turned a blind eye and the community ostracized victims. That sort of story fits perfectly with the rape culture narrative. A gang rape where the perpetrators are arrested, tried, and convicted doesn’t fit nearly as well.

          1. Eh, I agree with that for the most part, with “Rape Culture” being a product *only of* the white elite power structure. Hence UVA, with its “aura of preppy success,… tanned and overwhelmingly blond students.”

            If all the gritty details were the same (imagined or not) but the school in question was, say, Howard I don’t think we’d see such a fevered reaction.

  12. “Culture doesn’t commit crime?individuals do.”

    Yet that’s precisely the thinking at the root of the “rape culture” meme: that rape is but one inevitable manifestation of an entire patriarchal culture built on male dominance over women.

    “substance abuse…was the tool by which Batey and Vandenburg perpetrated the crime”

    For those who prefer the individual responsibility meme, this statement implies that the woman did not voluntarily engage in drinking or other behavior that led to the sexual assault, that women are really objects with no personal will or moral agency, and that men are always responsible for women’s decisions and actions when sex is involved.

    1. For those who prefer the individual responsibility meme, this statement implies that the woman did not voluntarily engage in drinking or other behavior that led to the sexual assault, that women are really objects with no personal will or moral agency, and that men are always responsible for women’s decisions and actions when sex is involved.

      Being carried away to be gang-raped by several men is a reasonably foreseeable consequence of having a few drinks at a party, to you? I don’t see how else you could draw all of those inferences from that statement.

    2. this statement implies that the woman did not voluntarily engage in drinking or other behavior that led to the sexual assault

      No it doesn’t. And it’s obviously possible for someone to voluntarily get shitfaced and still be raped afterward. Your boyfriend is not supposed to just wait for you to get hammered and then decide it’s a fine time to call in his boys to fuck you.

    3. Are you trolling, autistic, or stupid?

        1. He wasn’t talking to you, NutraSweet.

  13. For the backstory on the meme of “rape culture” and the battle between the individualist and cultural theories of rape, see All Sex is Rape ? All Men are Rapists: Patriarchy = Rape Culture

    1. No one gives a fuck about your fucking blog, fucktits.

    2. You are putting your finger on something that explains a lot of what underlies the current “rape crisis.” For most of the world, rape is a crime of violence that occurs when one human forces himself onto someone else against that other person’s will. For the true believing feminist, who thinks that all females are born lesbian but are “brutalized” into accepting heterosexuality, and that sexual relations constitutes “male imperialism” against the female body, “rape” means virtually any sexual intercourse between males and females. Therefore, what the rest of the world sees as unjust and overreaching campus rape policies is seen by the feminists who support them as going nowhere near far enough, and why those who oppose the policies are labelled as “rape apologists.”

      1. PIV is always rape, ok?

        1. “The fact intercourse causes so many infections and tears and warts attests to the unnaturalness of intercourse, that it’s not meant to be.”

  14. And in UVA news: Jezebel can’t find any proof of frat rapes, but UVA still feels all, like, rapey and stuff.

    I don’t recommend reading all 7,700 words of nothingness like I did.

  15. Note = “Vandy” is the worst @#($*@ nickname ever. so, so lame. To make matters worse? “Commodores”. ugh. Its always made me think of some gaudy Pirates of Penzance production.

    I do have a t-shirt somewhere which says

    (Big letters)
    VANDERBILT
    (small letters)
    it even *sounds* expensive

    I don’t really follow my alma mater; i only heard of this story a couple of weeks ago, and that was only because i was reading the sports section.

    In my time *(mid 90s) the school was mostly characterized by a fairly conservative social-scene. the typical example was how you took “dates” to football games. And you wore a tie. I don’t know if they still do that.

    1. You know what other school’s students wear ties to football games? U.Va. *nods knowingly*

      1. no shit.

        5 of my family members went to UVA. I have generational ties to the school. I would have gone but i stubbornly refused to apply early. But I used to go to games and sing the grand ol song when i was a kid. Part of the appeal of VU were its similarities.

        1. Funny. I went to U.Va and my wife was U.Va undergrad and Vandy for grad. Lots of similarities indeed, right down to lousy football teams.

          1. Hey, wait. Was she into chemistry? I knew a fellow grad student at Vandy who went to UVA.

            1. MBA. Though she might have been trolling around the chem labs for a future MD or something. She probably could stand to trade-up.

        2. *ahem*

          That would be the Good Old Song.

          Thaaaaat good old song of Wahoowa
          We’ll sing it o’er and o’er
          It cheers our hearts and warms our blood
          Tooooo hear them shout and roar
          We come from old Virginia,
          Where all is bright and gay
          Let’s all join hands and give a yell
          Forrrrr dear old U-V-A

          1. “That would be the Good Old Song.”

            yeah. I suppose “grand ol” was probably something that rubbed off in Nashville as well.

            1. Wait. You mean the Good Old Song isn’t this? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8AKNiVBqFDM

  16. The thing that strikes me about this case is how epically stupid these guys were. This was a rape case where the victim didn’t remember what happened and one of the accused was her boyfriend and they got a conviction. The government never wins those kinds of cases. These guys not only filmed themselves raping a passed out woman, but apparently also told multiple witnesses “hey we are raping a passed out women”. I can always fathom evil, but stupid sometimes really perplexes me. I can totally see how someone is evil enough to do this. But I cannot fathom how someone could be this stupid when they do do it.

    1. Evil and stupid actually often go hand in hand, John. Evil geniuses are mostly the stuff of movies and books.

      1. The prison population isn’t so large because the cops are smart.

        1. The prison population is so large because so much shit that shouldn’t be illegal is. If so much shit wasn’t illegal, dumb people wouldn’t be being imprisoned for doing things that hurt no one.

          1. We have an entire justice system that is designed to snare the stupid and the unwary.

            1. To snare and fleece them of money, don’t forget. Almost the whole justice system is a revenue mill.

      2. Yes, that is very true. Most evil people are just idiots with poor impulse control and reasoning skills.

      3. But what about that famous criminologist (known mostly by his 1st initials, which I forgot along with his name), cited by Crichton as having conducted a study showing the prison popul’n to be of avg. intelligence, which suggests that criminals on avg. are smarter than avg. because prison selects for those who get caught?

        1. Sounds like nonsense for two reasons. The demographics of the prison population would mean that, if criminals are on average…average, then really smart blacks are going to prison, unless you meant to disaggregate by race. But then it runs into my second reason, which is that the correlation between IQ and “smart enough not to get caught” has not been established.

    2. This case ends all the mystery about how Franklin was able to recruit so well.

      1. speaking of which…who was it recently that revealed that their African American studies program just handed out passing grades to student athletes? North Carolina

        …this was sort of always a ‘known thing’ at VU; athletes were mostly ‘exempt’ from school. They got busted themselves once in the 1990s for having some idiot players. But then they had to make a big show of drawing the line when Ron Mercer wanted to play for Vandy (he scored like 300 on his SATs or something). They always struggled with the idea that they could play in the SEC and also be an actual ‘school’.

      2. These guys are so fucked. Rape is a violent crime. They are going to get ten or twenty years for this and automatically go to a medium security prison. They won’t be at some camp with a bunch of dope fiends and bad check writers. They will go to real prison with actual criminals. Medium security prison in Tennessee, what a nightmare.

        1. I’ve never heard of medium security prison. Is that a real thing or a typo?

          1. It’s real.

          2. Yes. There is minimum, medium and maximum. Non violent offenders usually go to minimum unless they have a really long sentence. Violent ones automatically go to medium. People who fuck up and get cross with the guards go to maximum.

        2. are we talking about “Pound me in the a$$” prison here John?

          1. That was a federal prison, this is state jurisdiction.

  17. they’re always referred to as football players, though I have no idea if that’s relevant or just convenient

    It’s so that sports radio and sports TV will cover the story. If they weren’t athletes nobody on ESPN would give a flying fuck about the story.

  18. “Incidentally, I’ve seen some people hold up the Vandy case as if it somehow lessens the wrongness of Sabrina Rubin Erdely’s debunked University of Virginia rape story. The UVA gang rape might not have happened, they say, but there’s no reason it couldn’t have happened?look at Vandy! This response is, in a word, wrong.”

    Actually, this response is not simply “wrong.” It is unspeakable idiotic.

  19. Since the system worked at Vanderbilt, there was no scary threat lurking in the shadows that could be labeled “Rape Culture”.
    She needed a Boogeyman, and she created it at UVa.

  20. For the complete story of the now infamous Rolling Stone article on the alleged U-VA gang rape, its fallout, the media firestorm of criticism, the apology, and the demagoguery of those radical feminists who refuse to apologize for propagating the myth of “rape culture” and the meme of “victim culture”, see: Yellow Journalism and the Meme of “Rape Culture” – Rolling Stone and U-VA Gang Rape

    For the backstory on Sabrina Rubin Erdely’s entire journalism career built on fictions and half-truths, see: Journalistic Fabulism and Ideological Agendas ? the Sabrina Rubin Erdely Story

  21. For an in-depth expose of the evolution of universities from institutions of higher learning into witch-hunt tribunals for the “rape culture” advocates, see: New Puritanism ? New Paternalism: The “Rape Culture” Narrative Demeans Women, Demonizes Men, and Turns Universities into Witch Hunt Tribunals

    The deprivation of basic constitutional rights for men and their attempts to fight back are addressed in: The Pendulum Reverses ? Again: The Betrayal of Liberty on America’s Campuses & Men Strike Back against Title IX Tribunals

  22. For the history of the shift of the Women’s Rights Movement from an egalitarian to a totalitarian one, see: When Progressive Social Change Becomes Regressive Ideology: From Women’s Liberation to Cultural Misandry

    For the backstory on the way the meme of “rape culture” was created from the misandric feminist leadership and eventually insinuated into almost every facet of US society, including nearly every media story on the “epidemic” of campus sexual assault, see: All Sex is Rape ? All Men are Rapists: Patriarchy = Rape Culture

  23. Or it could’ve been like Ferguson, chosen for the furor and side-picking it would provoke.

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