Marijuana

Marijuana Use Rose in Colorado and Washington Last Year. Boo?

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Jacob Sullum

Recently published data from the National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH) indicate that cannabis consumption rose in Colorado and Washington after voters in those states approved legalization at the end of 2012. The numbers, reported as two-year averages to compensate for small sample sizes, show the rate of past-year marijuana use among Coloradans 12 and older rising from 16.2 percent in 2011-12 to 18.9 percent in 2012-13; the rate of past-month use rose from 12.2 percent to 14.9 percent. In Washington, meanwhile, past-year use rose from 15.4 percent to 17.5 percent, and past-month use rose from 11.9 percent to 13.7 percent. All of those increases are statistically significant and larger than the increases in the corresponding national rates.

Did legalization contribute to these increases in consumption? Possibly, although marijuana use was already rising in both states before the 2012 votes and the legal changes between 2012 and 2013 were limited to abolishing penalties for possession and (in Colorado) for sharing and home cultivation. Legal recreational sales did not begin until this year.

Are the increases cause for alarm? The editorial board of The Denver Post thinks so. In an editorial published yesterday, the paper calls the Colorado numbers "disturbing," saying "there's no way to put a positive spin on the latest news on marijuana use in Colorado since the passage of Amendment 64," the state's legalization measure. I disagree: By itself, rising cannabis consumption should count as a benefit of legalization, since it indicates an increase in consumer satisfaction. There may be costs as well, but at this point their nature and magnitude are not clear.  

The impact of legalization on car accidents, for instance, will require years to assess. Since alcohol has a more dramatic effect on driving ability than marijuana does, legalization could reduce traffic fatalities if more pot smoking is accompanied by less drinking. So far that sort of substitution has not happened in Colorado, where past-month alcohol consumption rose slightly between 2011-12 and 2012-13, although the change was not statistically significant. Washington, by contrast, saw a statistically significant drop in past-month alcohol use.

What about underage marijuana consumption? According to the NSDUH, it rose slightly in Colorado and fell slightly in Washington; neither change was statistically significant. Another survey found a small, statistically insignificant drop in marijuana use by Colorado teenagers between 2012 and 2013. Again, these numbers precede the opening of state-licensed pot shops, so they do not show whether diversion from adult buyers is boosting underage consumption.

Whatever the costs of legalization, of course, they need to be weighed against the costs of prohibition, which include the frustration of consumer desires as well as the direct effects of criminalization and the problems associated with a black market. Some might even argue that a utilitarian weighing of costs and benefits is inappropriate in this context, since nothing can make it just to punish people for actions that violate no one's rights. 

Addendum: Chris Goldstein notes that the increases in self-reported cannabis consumption may reflect a greater willingness to admit marijuana use now that it is no longer a crime under state law.

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  1. ERMAHGERD! We didn’t actually want people to use the stuff after we made it legal to use the stuff!!!

  2. It couldn’t have anything to do with people not being as afraid to admit to using cannabis since it’s legal now. No way it could be that. Must be because of the pushers getting bolder on the playgrounds.

    1. Damn you.

    2. As someone who lives in WA and smokes weed and knows lots of weed smokers I can assure you, at least anecdotally, that people openly talking about weed consumption skyrocketed immediately after legalization. Suddenly we were talking about it openly at work, in bars, people stopped whispering when talking about it, etc.

      It’s difficult to prove but I would bet serious money on this being a factor in the supposed increased consumption.

    3. “It couldn’t have anything to do with people not being as afraid to admit to using cannabis since it’s legal now.”

      That means there were users who were afraid of admitting to smoking pot before legalization. What do we make of polls that supposedly showed decline in pot use prior to legalization?

  3. Or maybe the change in legal status resulted in some people who would have otherwise lied on the questionnaire to tell the truth. I know I certainly didn’t tell the truth when I was quizzed about my use of illegal drugs as a teenager.

    1. Very true. I didn’t tell the truth either? but I had never tried any.

      1. By the time I was in my first assembly where they handed out the forms and stressed the anonymity of them, I had tried weed, hash, and acid. I admitted nothing.

        1. Our first one was in Freshman English. Being freshmen, none of my friends had really tried anything other than weed and booze, but we all marked “use several times a day” about everything.

        2. Never tried hash. Would like to someday. Is it included in CO’s legalization? I’m trying to get my Pa to go skiing at Breckenridge next year instead of UT.

          1. Go to Beaver Creek. Less crowded than Breck and has several convenient dispensaries.

            1. Go to Beaver Creek. Less crowded than Breck and has several convenient dispensaries.

              Love the looks of their trail map, too!

          2. Yes. Ice hash, hash oil and wax are both available. I’d suggest the ice hash, as wax is very easy to overdo.

            1. I get the sense that wax is for 24/7 stoners who want to feel like people do when they rarely smoke. It’s uncomfortable for all but the thc tolerant.

              1. It’s also nice if you don’t want to inhale lots of smoke and don’t want to wait for an hour for edibles to take effect. You just have to be really careful with the dose.

          3. It’s all cannabis, so it is all pretty similar in effect. But hash is wonderful stuff. The wax/oil sort of stuff I wouldn’t recommend to anyone who doesn’t take cannabis products regularly. If you just want the occasional smoke up, some good bud or hash is the way to go.

          4. Breck is getting bombed right now. By snow, that is.

          5. Not implying anything here (yes I am), but I think I might go for the wax.

            1. I tried wax once. . .

              I’m “experienced,” in the parlance. . . and that shit knocked my dick in the dirt.
              The 15 mile drive home was. . . interesting.

              Enjoy! But hold on to your ass, Fred. . .

    2. I always admitted to what I had tried on those surveys. I may have even embellished a bit. Hard to say if more teenagers would do what you did or what I did. I recall having some sense of pride about the collection of drugs I had tried.

      1. I’ve never trusted anyone with any authority who claims to be collecting information anonymously.

        1. I didn’t give a shit, I guess. And teachers liked me, so I could get away with a lot. Nothing bad ever came of it as far as I can see.

          I also liked answering the surveys that also asked about your academic performance and stuff like that because I wanted to be part of the statistics as someone who did lots of pot and acid and did well in school.

    3. I don’t even tell my doctor the truth.

      1. Same here. I know what the law says about the privacy of medical records, but since when did the government pay any attention to privacy laws?

  4. increases in self-reported cannabis consumption may reflect a greater willingness to admit marijuana use now that it is no longer a crime under state law.

    No shit. I don’t really think you can compare pre- and post-legalization survey results.

    1. Squirrels are getting pretty high!

  5. increases in self-reported cannabis consumption may reflect a greater willingness to admit marijuana use now that it is no longer a crime under state law.

    No shit. I don’t really think you can compare pre- and post-legalization survey results.

    1. Squirrels are getting pretty high!

  6. Of course the rate should rise since more people are willing use it as medicine now that it is legal.

    1. Plus people who wouldn’t try it because it was illegal may try it now.

      I’m thinking a surge after legalization followed by a decline back to “normal”.

      I’m pretty sure that was the pattern after Prohibition was repealed.

      1. There are plenty of people who just don’t like weed, or like it for a while and get tired of it. I;m sure there are plenty who try it because it is now legal, but don’t really get into it in a big way.

        1. That may not be true with the rise of high CBD strains. Epileptics moving to Colorado aren’t doing it to get high.

          1. Yeah, how much of the rise is from medical use is a good question.

            As more people realize that there are truly legitimate and highly effective medical uses for cannabis, I expect those numbers to climb faster than recreational use.

      2. (I’m thinking recreationally and not medically.)

  7. I would imagine that as the cost of something goes down, more people will use it. I should submit this idea to an economic journal – I’ll probably get a prize.

    When the cost of potential arrest, and other hassles of illegal status, is eliminated, it’s easier – “cheaper” – to get dope, ergo more people will be getting it. People who wouldn’t want to risk arrest and deal with sketchy dealers may be quite willing to go down to the corner store.

    The surprise to me would be if dope use stayed constant.

  8. YAH!

  9. Chris Goldstein notes that the increases in self-reported cannabis consumption may reflect a greater willingness to admit marijuana use now that it is no longer a crime under state law.

    Yup. If some person from the government asked me if I smoked pot in the last month, I would without a doubt say “no” even if I was still stoned off my arse from smoking it 10 minutes ago because it’s illegal in my state.

  10. I remember when they passed out this type questionaire in one of my high school classes. The teacher assured us it was totally anonymous and that nothing would happen to us for admitting to our drug use. It was then that I glanced out the window and saw a band of militarized police with drug sniffing dogs…

    Ok, that didn’t happen, but I am sure you get the picture.

  11. Marijuana Use Rose in Colorado and Washington Last Year.

    Did someone claim it wouldn’t? If they were arguing that as a reason to legalize, they are fighting the wrong fight. It doesn’t matter if more people use. It also doesn’t matter if the number of highway fatalities go up.

    The only thing that matters is that the government has no business telling me what I can and cannot put in my own body.

    It’s not government’s job to keep me safe. It’s government’s job to protect my rights.

    1. Of course, that is the real answer. Unfortunately that seems to be a minority view these days. People for the most part want pot legalized because it’s not such a bad drug, not because of any silly thing like rights. If you start worrying about rights, then you need to legalize meth and heroin too.

    2. You’re using logic and reason here. Those things have no place in governance.

      1. He’s also using different premises than many people do. A lot think that it is government’s job to keep us safe and that rights are a political matter.

    3. It’s not government’s job to keep me safe. It’s government’s job to protect my rights.

      That’s wild talk there Fransisco!

      BTW, one frustrating thing is that people think it’s freedom vs safety when often safety is the product of freedom.

      What makes drugs unsafe? The drug war! If bayer was free to sell heroin, would people OD? Not as much, since they’d know the purity of what they were buying. If bayer was free to experiment with delivery mechanisms, would users be getting collapsed veins? Probably not. Would addicts turn to crime to afford their fix? I doubt it, it would be about as expensive as a box of chocolates. Would users who did OD be as likely to die? No; they would be less fearful of calling for medical help.

      And last but not least… I wouldn’t have to worry about jackbooted thugs kicking in my door at 1AM because some lickspittle trying to curry favor lied to them about buying some stuff from me last week.

      1. Opioids in particular would be cheap as shit without prohibition or taxes. I doubt it woudl cost any more to maintain a heroin habit than it does to be a heavy drinker (especially if you drink at bars).

        I think that kind of drug is a really good example of the horrors of prohibition. Opioid addiction isn’t a great way to live, in general, but with a cheap, reliable supply, it is really pretty benign. The drug itself does very little damage. It’s adulterants, high cost and poor injection practices that cause most of the problems.

        1. That is exactly right Zeb. What kills heroin users usually is misjudging their dose and oding. This usually happens because the retard street dealer they bought it from didn’t cut it right and gave them really pure heroin without telling them.

          The health problems associated with pain pills are the result of them being mixed with Tylenol. I think it is Vicodins that are mixed with Tylenol specifically so it harms people who take them long term.

          Taking large doses of Tylenol or Ibuprofen for long periods will cause all kinds of health problems like deafness and your kidneys going bad. And those drugs are perfectly legal and commercials encourage people to take them by the handfuls.

      2. And last but not least… I wouldn’t have to worry about jackbooted thugs kicking in my door at 1AM because some lickspittle trying to curry favor lied to them about buying some stuff from me last week.

        And we don’t have to worry about police accidentally shooting or strangling or beating to death anyone arrested for violations of marijuana prohibition.

      3. And last but not least… I wouldn’t have to worry about jackbooted thugs kicking in my door at 1AM because some lickspittle trying to curry favor lied to them about buying some stuff from me last week.

        …or because the lickspittle ratted out your neighbor and the jackbooted thugs don’t know how to read a sign.

    4. It’s not government’s job to keep me safe. It’s government’s job to protect my rights.

      You’re gonna get put on some sort of list if you keep talking like that.

  12. A few thoughts. First, as a bunch of people already said, perhaps more people admit to use when it is legal.
    Second, drug use rates always go up and down a bit from year to year, particularly among younger people. This happened before it was legalized anywhere. Why assume that legalization has anything to do with the small changes in usage rates.
    Finally, am I the only one who thinks that the numbers seem kind of low? Maybe it’s the company I keep, but I would have thought that more people smoked pot than 1 in 5 or 6.

    1. I, for one, would smoke regularly if it were legal. It’s like Eddie points out above. The risk of getting busted (or more importantly, losing my gun rights) stops me. The cost is too high (for me). So the drug warriors are right in that respect, prohibition does keep some portion of the population from using. But that’s not a justification for prohibition. (Not even getting into the negative effects prohibition directly causes.)

      1. I know others in the same situation. I would really expect to see usage go up with legalization.

        What will really make usage rates go up, I think, is if and when more employers stop testing for cannabis. I think the biggest deterrent at the moment is workplace drug testing.

  13. We can only allow people to use drugs if not as many people use them. Otherwise, we have to make it illegal, even if that means more people start using them and we have to lock them up in a cage or kill them. For the children.

    /logic of a statist.

  14. This story reminds me of this story: “People in the South are not so fat after all — and they lie less”

    In self-reported studies, people in the US South come out as the most overweight while people in studies where a third party measures weight and reports it, the US Midwest comes out as the most overweight. It turns out, Southerners are more honest about their weight while most other regions lie more about it.

    This is why you should take self-reported data with a huge grain of salt.

  15. See! Legalization doesn’t work!

  16. although marijuana use was already rising in both states before the 2012 votes

    What are “trend-lines”?

  17. It may be dilute compared to the overall state population, but there has reportedly been a swell in the number of folks moving to Colorado due to the benefits of recreational marijuana legalization.

    Anecdotally I can report that a cousin moved here and he’s stoned out of his gourd all the time.

  18. The justification for the drug war lies on the assumption that drugs are somehow different than other vices such that they take away your free will and victimize anyone who uses them. Of course that is complete nonsense that is totally contrary to the facts.

    The fact is that millions of people try even the hardest drugs and even use them recreationally for periods of their lives and never become addicts or even long term users. If drugs really do rob people of their free will, then everyone or nearly everyone who tried them would become addicts. Instead, nearly everyone who tries drugs doesn’t become an addict or even find them worth using over the long term.

    The response is that drugs do rob people of their free will but just some people. And the answer to that is so what? There are people who are unable to handle every vice. People who drink themselves to death, people who can’t stop eating or even do productive things to such a degree they harm themselves and their families. That still doesn’t make the case that drugs are special.

    The real case the drug warriors try and make is that if drugs were legal use and abuse would explode such that it would be more harmful than any harms created by prohibition. This is why legalizing marijuana is such a deadly threat to the drug laws.

    1. Here we get to see a real life experiment in what happens when a drug is legalized. And sure enough use isn’t going up. And if that turns out to be true for pot, and it likely will, then it is going to be very hard for prohibitionists to claim it is true for other drugs. It is going to take a while, but I really think this is the beginning of a long, slow ending of the drug war.

  19. How long before colorodo passes the “Driving While Stoned” crime-bill?

    Followed by a ‘universal piss-test’ for everything?

    1. and dont give me shit about my spelling.

      Big up John Denver.

    2. The driving while stoned thing is interesting. From what I have read, people driving stoned are not much of a threat to anyone but themselves. Drunk drivers are a threat because drinking not only slows your reflexes and reduces your motor skills, it also affects your judgement and causes people to take more risks and drive faster and such. Pot mellows people out. It is very unlikely that someone stoned on pot is going to be doing 80 and slam into a school bus. So, I am not sure they are going to have enough dead bodies to properly launch the war on stoned driving from.

      1. It’s also unlikely that a person who is normally mellow and doesn’t get into any trouble, will get stoned and unexpectedly turn violent. Which is something that is not rare at all with alcohol. Say there is a public gathering place where people go specifically to consume cannabis. Can you imagine that turning into a violent brawl like the ones that happen at a dive bar?

        But don’t think they are not going to launch a war on stoned driving. It’s an absolute sure thing that they will. They are already gearing up for it. People will be busted right and left for this, it will be the cops new wet dream, complete with tons of asset forfeiture.

        1. Yea. People all are convinced driving while stoned is worse than drunk driving. I mean pot was illegal right? So sadly you are probably correct.

          And you are dead right in your assessment of pot versus alcohol. Stoned people are annoying as hell to be around sober, but they are totally mellow and harmless. A lot of drunks are dangerous. I am a bit that way. Drinking generally intensifies whatever emotion you are feeling. If you are happy, you are even happier. Depressed, even more so. And if you are pissed off, you can become downright volcanic if you have a bad temper. There are a lot of “mean drunks” in the world. I know this because I can be one. There is to my knowledge not a single “mean stoner”.

        2. “But don’t think they are not going to launch a war on stoned driving. It’s an absolute sure thing that they will. They are already gearing up for it”

          Which is sort of my point.

          I think that’s just the tip of the iceberg as well. The whole process here is to begin to build the regulatory-state infrastructure on how “Legal Weed” is controlled.

          Its going to be just like alcohol (or at least follow that roadmap).

      2. “From what I have read, people driving stoned are not much of a threat to anyone but themselves.”

        well, that’s the most dangerous threat of all.

        All its going to take is some sensationalized incidents and then some bullshit ‘studies’ before they’ve insisted on the development on a Stoner-Breathalyzer and regular screenings of school-teachers, truck drivers, and surgeons.

        Side note:

        I knew a few adults (friend’s parents, friends of friends) growing up in NYC who were *chronic* (no pun) weed smokers. I mean 24/7. It was a complete rarity to catch them when they weren’t stoned to the gills. 2 were lawyers (*and competent/successful by any measure), 2 were ‘doctor-ish’ (Ob/Gyn and a dentist), one was an electrical engineer, and another was a (duh) record-producer.

        All were jewish. Neither here nor there, just saying. In fact, i think almost all of them had similar personality quirks (*sort of nebbishy/horribly anxious when NOT high) that the weed entirely rectified/compensated for. They couldn’t relax otherwise. all of their spouses virtually insisted they be stoned all the time else they be completely unbearable.

        1. I could totally see that. And related to my point below, I am sure they could have gone to a shrink and gotten a script for some kind of anxiety medicine that would no doubt be a hundred times more potent and dangerous than pot.

          Pot is not a bad drug for some people. I think you have to be a little high strung or anxious in some way to really appreciate it. When normal people smoke it, it often just gives them a headache or makes them tired. I have known a lot of people who tried pot a couple of times and hated it because it just made them sleepy and gave them a headache. All such people were generally pretty even keeled and not very anxious.

        2. There are a lot of people like that. Many of the smartest hardest working people I know smoke weed all the time.

          Weed doesn’t make anyone a loser. It helps make losers even bigger losers sometimes.

          1. I think that is true of all drugs Zeb. It is the person not the drug. The drug is just the means they use to be a loser. It doesn’t make someone a loser who wasn’t already one.

            1. Probably. At least if you got rid of prohibition.

              I do know a few smart, hard working people who became pretty pathetic junkies. I’m not saying it was the drug itself that was at fault. But I do think that some drugs are easier to live with than others. But a bigger factor is probably that some people are just more prone to addiction than others.

          2. Exactly! A lazy person is even lazier on weed. Someone who isn’t lazy isn’t lazy even on weed.

      3. I’m not sure how stoned drivers are even a threat to themselves (except they might be late).

        If you are super baked, or not used to being stoned, I’m sure it effects reaction time and stuff. But you compensate. The biggest difference between drunk and stoned driving, I think, is that when you are drunk you think you are driving better than you actually are and when you are stoned you think you are driving worse than you actually are. And being drunk does a lot more to impair your motor skills. Driving drunk is way more fun, which is why I had to cut that out.

        1. The biggest difference between drunk and stoned driving, I think, is that when you are drunk you think you are driving better than you actually are

          You mean driving drunk really isn’t my super power?

          1. Well, you never know.

        2. Well, technically, if you’re driving super slow and being way overly cautious, you can cause an accident, but I’m sure you’d be less likely to cause as much damage or injury because you’re going slower. That being said, I’ve never been in an accident high or drunk, but I have been in accidents sober. Hmm, I guess I’m a safer driver when high or drunk! I should drive high more often! (how to lie with numbers 101) XD

          1. That’s what cruise control is for. Stoned people on highways. If you are on a single lane road, you’ll mostly just annoy people by driving slow.

  20. One important thing not mentioned in this article. The number of accidental overdoses of pain killers has gone down since pot became legal in Colorado. If for no other reason, that is one good thing that came from legalization.

    1. That is a very good thing. And it points to the utter insanity of our drug laws. Pain pills are nothing but heroin. They are just better made and sometimes mixed with other medicines. When someone is proscribed pain pills, they are being proscribed legalized heroin.

      There is of course nothing wrong with that. What is wrong is that we think it is okay to do that but if someone smokes pot, a drug that is a hundred times more benign than heroin, for pain relief, they are a criminal. We feed kids coming back from Iraq the most vile sorts of psychiatric drugs that are known to have side effects like suicidal thoughts or auditory hallucinations, yet will kick them out of the military and take their benefits if they so much as smoke a single joint. And we know pot is effective at treating PTSD. It is just fucking evil.

  21. The other way to look at it would be that the entire law enforcement effort made to make pot illegal only managed to stop 2% of the population from using it.

    The entire rigamarole. For 2%.

    Anti-legalization forces also tend to claim that legalization will result in the wholesale destruction of youth and the soma-ization and dehumanization of the populace. That’s asking an awful lot of a 2% move.

    1. Like I say above, it disproves the entire assumption behind the drug war; that drugs are somehow special and people can’t be trusted not to abuse them.

  22. The numbers are bullshit. Of a hundred or so people I know representing a pretty decent cross section of society maybe 5 don’t use pot and I am one of the 5. I don’t smoke it because I don’t find its effects pleasant. I tried it in the late 70’s, early 90’s and again about five years ago. It was awful. My metabolism I guess. Same for the other handful of people I know who don’t use it.

    The people who like it are smoking it, period. Prohibition or legalization make no difference in usage.

    1. Pretty much. And most people don’t really like using drugs. I wonder sometimes what exactly the drug warriors think being high feels like. They really must think it is some kind of an amazing experience if they are so convinced no one with access to it would ever want to do anything else.

      1. I have known a few drug warriors. They were all stoners.

        1. I should have elaborated. They were all cops, and all evil bastards. These were the kinds of people you don’t want to be around, ever, for any reason. They were also stoners. I am pretty sure the drug warrior types are projecting the same way proggies do with regards to their policy preferences.

      2. I like the feeling of it, but only once I learned my limits. I’ve had a few times where I got entirely too stoned and had the worst anxiety attacks of my life (and I’m already prone to anxiety attacks due to PTSD). I simply stopped using it for awhile and then when I decided to try again, I just had a hit or two at a time. It all depends on how they’re collecting their data. I think most people who don’t use it don’t care if other people are.

  23. Oh my god! It’s legal and consumption went up?! Gee, I wonder if that’s because that’s what the voters wanted? Besides, it is a good thing, especially if people drink less because marijuana is available legally. Marijuana doesn’t cause liver damage or diabetes that I’ve ever heard of. Alcohol on the other hand…. Yeah. And while it *can* be difficult to drive under the influence of marijuana, you’re more likely to be extra cautious because of paranoia than get into an accident because you’re swerving all over the place. And in any case, if you’re feeling overly paranoid, you’re more likely to say “I need to come down a bit before I start driving” on marijuana than people are to say “I’m too drunk to drive” with alcohol. It affects reaction times, but in my experience (my own and those I’ve smoked with) it doesn’t really affect judgement. I have yet to hear of pot goggles, despite the horniness it can cause. It can make it difficult to concentrate, which is where any potential danger is. And of course, you will have irresponsible users just like with any other drug. Punish the irresponsible people who do stupid shit, not the average user who does it once in awhile in the comfort of their own home.

    1. Celebrities like Richard Burton and Humphrey Bogart who drank every day and every day hard, all died young. In contrast, people like Bink Crosby (yes Bing was a daily pot user his entire adult life), Louis Armstrong and Willie Nelson who were and are just as big of stoners as Burton or Bogart were drunks, all lived to old age. Alcohol is used in excess will kill you. Pot will at most make you boring.

  24. Basic supply and demand.

    The supply curve shifted with legality.

  25. “Whatever the costs of legalization, of course, they need to be weighed against the costs of prohibition, which include the frustration of consumer desires as well as the direct effects of criminalization and the problems associated with a black market.”

    Right. Governments spend BILLIONS of dollars investigating, arresting, processing, prosecuting, and jailing marijuana consumers. – 20 million Americans are now locked away in permanent, second-class citizenship because of a marijuana arrest. They will forever face huge obstacles to decent employment, education, travel, housing, government benefits, and will always go into court with one strike against them. They can even have their children taken away!

    That has a horrible effect on the whole country, being an incredible waste of human potential.

    “Some might even argue that a utilitarian weighing of costs and benefits is inappropriate in this context, since nothing can make it just to punish people for actions that violate no one’s rights.”

    YES! – How much is freedom worth?

    Professor Julian Heicklen never smoked, or cared about, marijuana. But when he retired in 1998, he decided the most important thing he could do was to lead marijuana smoke-outs at the Gates of Penn State, every Thursday for more than a year. Of course, he was arrested several times. When asked why he was doing this, he replied:

    “Marijuana is the messenger, not the message. The issue is whether we will live in freedom or in tyranny!”

    1. Wow. That guy is pretty awesome.

      1. Without a doubt. I wish I had been a student of his.

  26. The criterion “12 and older” is not meaningful. It should separate into at least the groups that Monitoring-The-Future (or YRBSS) uses to measure prevalence. Then we’d see ‘apples-apples’ comparisons. More important, the concern that pot smoking is not good for developing brains. If it turns out to be true, we’ll want to have that data by age group.

  27. Yeah.. I totally agree usage of alcohol causes higher rate of car accident than using marijuana. Luckily this has been now legalized. Read more here: http://www.ilovegrowingmarijua…..-colorado/

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