Obamacare

Ohio's GOP Governor: Repeal Obamacare—Just Not This Part That Affects Ohio

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credit: Nestlé / Foter / CC BY-NC-ND

For years, Republicans promised to "repeal and replace" Obamacare. But although several replace plans were drawn up, the GOP never rallied around any of them. Now, with Obamacare's coverage expansion kicked in, the party seems increasingly unable to reckon with the prospect of repeal.

For example, here's Ohio's Republican Governor John Kasich talking about the Medicaid expansion.

The Associated Press reports (link via Greg Sargent): 

Ohio Gov. John Kasich says he doesn't think there will be a repeal in Washington, even if Republicans win a Senate majority and consolidate their hold on the House in next month's election.

"That's not gonna happen," the Republican governor told The Associated Press during a recent re-election campaign swing.

Kasich called The Associated Press Monday night to clarify that he was speaking specifically about a repeal of Medicaid expansion and not of the entire Affordable Care Act—although opponents in Washington don't usually draw such distinctions.

He said he believes the ACA "can and should" be repealed, but that opposition to the Medicaid expansion "was really either political or ideological," adding, "I don't think that holds water against real flesh and blood and real improvements in people's lives."

(Side note here: People on Medicaid like it, but the best evidence is that it doesn't do much if anything to improve one's measurable physical health outcomes.)

More from Kasich, via Politico:

"I have favored expanding Medicaid, but I don't really see expanding Medicaid as really connected to Obamacare," he said.

Yes, the Supreme Court changed Obamacare's Medicaid expansion to make it optional for states, and yes, Medicaid existed as a jointly run and funded federal-state program before Obamacare was passed. But the Medicaid expansion Kasich is talking about is very much a part of Obamacare. 

And yet Kasich continues to insist that the law should be repealed and that he doesn't support it at all, never has.

"From Day One, and up until today and into tomorrow, I do not support Obamacare," Kasich said yesterday, according to Politico. "I never have, and I believe it should be repealed."

So repeal Obamacare…just not this one part that is affecting people here in my state. 

This is why it was so important to have a replacement plan, some alternative, or even just an explanation, ready. The question of what to do and what to say after the coverage expansion kicked in was never answered, or at least not answered effectively, and the result is clear enough. We see some Republicans refusing to answer questions about Medicaid; we see Kasich claiming that Medicaid isn't really part of Obamacare and should be saved; and we see Sen. Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) arguing that Kentucky's exchange, which doles out subsidies funded by Obamacare, is not really part of the law either. Republicans don't know what to do, because they didn't come up with a plan in advance. 

NEXT: Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder Signs "Right to Try" Law; a Win for Patient Rights

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  1. Reps have no intention of stopping free shit. Free shit is what gets the sheep to the booth.

  2. “Republicans don’t know what to do, because they didn’t come up with a plan in advance.”

    Another way to put it: “Republicans don’t know what to do, because if they had been in office they would have passed it too.”*

    *Of course, if Republicans had been in office, they would have made it less generous to poor people, and more generous to the rich.

    1. Via Alan Vanneman: Sherlock Holmes and the Giant Medicaid Expansion of Sumatra.

    2. Republicans don’t know what to do, because if they had been in office they would have passed it too.

      Even you can’t be dumb enough to believe this.

    3. When you want to be the least coherent commenter on the internet, the only person you’re really competing with is yourself.

      1. And Tony. And Dunphy. And JacknAce. And a few others.

    4. *Of course, if Republicans had been in office, they would have made it less generous to poor people, and more generous to the rich.

      And what would that have looked like?

      With the Democrats, we got a law saying that everyone in the country must purchase a product from one or the other duopolies that exist in your state.

      The republicans would have done what, demanded that you also tip 15%?

    5. I think this guy misspelled his own name.

  3. I can’t believe that anyone is taking Kasich (much less Rob Portman) seriously as a presidential contender.

  4. Stupid Party doing it’s stoopid thang!

  5. Well, I’m sold. No more wasted 3d party votes for me! TEAM RED, because they are going to really move the needle this time!

    1. Don’t discount the retarded for the mirage in the mist!

  6. Kasich is more or less Romney – a complete middle of the road milquetoast kind of guy. The shrieking left in this state has convinced themselves that he’s the devil himself, though, for some fucking reason. Again, exactly like Romney.

    1. THis. I was living in Ohio when he was elected. He’s definitely better than his predecessor, who was a COMPLETE fuckup.

      Kasich’s only MOSTLY fucked up, which means there’s a tiny, tiny part that’s NOT fucked up.

      But it’s obviously not the part that deals with PPACA.

    2. I dunno. I’d rather have dinner with a Romney than a Louis Gohmert. But who is the better person, really? The idiot who believes the nonsense that comes out of his mouth, or the clever moderate who says nonsense so that idiots will vote for him? It’s a dilemma I’ve been thinking about for a while.

      1. But you don’t think.

  7. We need to cut government to the bone! Just don’t cut any jobs or benefits!

  8. “Make the soul-sucking law applicable to everyone except me.”

    Zoom that in to voter-level and multiply by 120 million.

    Or quit trafficking in soul-sucking laws.

  9. Handing out free shit will always be popular. Taking away that free shit will always be impossible.

  10. Just another teathuglitarian racist hatemonger.

  11. : People on Medicaid like it, but the best evidence is that it doesn’t do much if anything to improve one’s measurable physical health outcomes.)

    “That nice man in the white coat made soothing noises at me, and it didn’t cost me a dime!”

  12. You mean they didn’t come up with a plan to deal with the possibility that the law would be popular? That’s what happens when you live inside an information bubble where all you hear are comforting confirmations of your political biases. Not that anyone here would know anything about that.

    1. PROJECTION TIME

      1. You can say a lot of things about me but not that I stay in an information bubble, as I am here.

    2. My health insurance went up $150/month this year thanks to the Unaffordable Health Care Act. Did I mention that the HRA went down and the deductible went up? Fuck you, and fuck Obama.

  13. That’s what happens when you live inside an information bubble where all you hear are comforting confirmations of your political biases.

    I’m feeling woozy, for some reason.

  14. Yeah, I’ve got a policy. “Tell all the states where Democrats and RINOs like Christie and Kasich accepted the expanded Medicaid that, sorry, they’re a bunch of idiots for building their state budgets around the sand of a pure party-line vote.”

    Next?

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