Charity/Philanthropy

DoD Worries People Might Think They Endorse Dumping Ice Water on Self for Charity

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The post below showed up on my Facebook wall yesterday afternoon, courtesy of the National Training Center at Fort Irwin, an Army post out in the California Mojave Desert I used to keep an eye on back in my newspaper editor days:

Usually official military advisories contain many more acronyms.
Facebook

If for some reason you can't read or see the image, it's a note from the Office of General Counsel Standards of Conduct Office for the Department of Defense that Defense employees, including military members, may not participate in the now-omnipresent Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) "ice bucket challenge" while in uniform. The military's justification is the fear that a soldier, sailor or Marine dumping ice cold water on him or herself could be perceived as official military endorsement of the nonprofit ALS Association.

Shameless attempt to get Drew to tweet link.

The Facebook comments tend to fall under the "Are you kidding me?" variety, complete with an amusing meme of Reason Foundation board member Drew Carey and his famous Whose Line Is it Anyway? explanation of rules and points (made up/don't matter).

This doesn't prevent people in the military from actually participating in the ice bucket challenge. They just have to take their uniform off first. Might I suggest stripping down on camera as well, slowly, perhaps to some appropriate music?

The right way. Though pants are optional.

Previously: Ed Krayewski noted that the ice bucket challenge could also be a good way to publicize the value of medical marijuana, which helps treat the symptoms and slow the progression of ALS.

NEXT: Grenade Launchers, Helicopters, and…Popcorn Machines? Highlights of the Ridiculous Items Given to Police by the DoD

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  1. Hmmm. and I did it (not in uniform, I am retired) but did call out the IL Guard’s AG and the State CSM…

  2. Next thing you know, there will be a “safety bulletin” requiring the use of reflective belts, eye protection, and a recent physical exam for anyone involved in this potentially hazardous activity.

  3. I have a better idea. The Kick in the Crotch challenge.

    Donate $100 to whatever, or get kicked in the crotch.

  4. I’m going to nitpick and point out that Drew Carey was in the Marines.

    1. Its not like the Marines don’t make up the rules either.

  5. “If it ain’t killing people; we’re against it!”

  6. One of a million such senseless edicts that drove me away screaming.

    Color me surprised.

    1. Why is this a senseless edict? I would think any company concerned with implied endorsements would do this sort of thing.

      At my company they also do not want us sending endorsements for charities unless it goes through the official “Employee Giving Program”. They have a brand to maintain after all.

      I don’t see this request as particularly noteworthy or bad.

  7. Dude seems to know where he is going.

    http://www.AnonCrypt.tk

  8. “…the ice bucket challenge could also be a good way to publicize…”

    Hypothermia

    …because, like, children and shit.

  9. The military’s justification is the fear that a soldier, sailor or Marine dumping ice cold water on him or herself could be perceived as official military endorsement of the nonprofit ALS Association.

    The real reason is they’re worried service members might not give as much during the “voluntary” CFC fundraising season and screw up the CFC coordinator’s OER or NCOER bullet point.

  10. So they object to the possibility that folks might want to give a bit more to a good cause since they saw someone in uniform do it?

    Makes good sense. Not to me, but it makes good sense to someone.

  11. I’ve got no issues with this at all. I think that they tend to do a good job of making it clear that you shouldn’t be doing outside stuff in uniform. That way, they don’t get into trouble when a soldier wants to wear a uniform when they do the ice bucket challenge in support of gay marriage or protesting against vaccinations.

    I just wish the military leaders would refuse to allow politicians to use service members as background scenery for photo ops and speeches. I hate that with a passion.

    1. I think that they tend to do a good job of making it clear that you shouldn’t be doing outside stuff in uniform. That way, they don’t get into trouble when a soldier wants to wear a uniform when they do the ice bucket challenge in support of gay marriage or protesting against vaccinations.

      I think the second sentence negates the first.

      Either they didn’t make it clear to the right people and/or they’re providing unnecessary “clarification” to the wrong people.

      1. Yeah, my sentence could be read in a few ways. To clarify… because they do a good job of making it clear that you shouldn’t do anything like that in uniform, it happens much less often.

        They don’t have to fight battles over whether it is okay to wear uniform in ALS bucket challenge vs. whether it’s okay to wear uniform at gay rights parade. The reason is because they make it clear that it’s not okay to wear uniform at anything like that.

        If they say a uniform is okay for ALS Bucket (because who on earth is pro-ALS?) then what level of support for a cause is required before it’s okay to support it in uniform?

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