Edward Snowden

Ron Paul Argues for Clemency for NSA Whistleblower Edward Snowden

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Snowden Obama
Der Spiegel

Former Rep. Ron Paul is has relaunched his petition at Voices of Liberty urging clemency for NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden. Paul writes:

Mr. Snowden made headlines in late spring 2013 when he revealed in a videotaped interview with investigative journalists Glenn Greenwald and Laura Poitras that our federal government has been operating a massive spying program.

The revelations have and continue to open our minds to the truth and power of our government. We are being watched and recorded. And we don't have to do anything wrong; individuals can be falsely attacked to derive suspicion.

Reflecting on Mr. Snowden's sacrifices — his livelihood, citizenship and freedom — made to provide us with the disturbing scope of the National Security Agency (NSA) mass surveillance and data collection efforts, we at Voices of Liberty want to thank him for being a voice for freedom, liberty and truth.

The White House Pardon Petition for Snowden states:

Edward Snowden is a national hero and should be immediately issued a a full, free, and absolute pardon for any crimes he has committed or may have committed related to blowing the whistle on secret NSA surveillance programs.

Paul is seeking 100,000 signatures on his clemency petition. The Paul petition is here.  And go here to sign the White House petition. FWIW, I've signed both.

For more background, see my article, "President Obama: Pardon Edward Snowden."

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  1. Well, I signed the petition. I’m sure that puts me on some list…

  2. I think advocating clemency for Snowden is a great idea–because Obama will never do it, and it makes Obama look like the stubborn, generationally challenged, hateful, vindictive bastard he really is.

  3. Regardless of what one may think of Snowden or his motives, too much has been revealed to label him anything other than a whistleblower. In better times, the entire administration would’ve fallen over this one issue. We’d be seeing prosecutions galore. Now, not so much.

    1. I have been convinced that everything Snowden revealed was legal or just a misunderstanding.

      *holds breath, waits to get off list*

    2. The press cares more about kids locked in cars.

    3. You dirty, Koch brothers brainwashed, racist.

  4. I’ll be the one sitting over here holding my breath.

  5. Ha. Maybe if Rand is elected president but otherwise there is no way the powers that rule will accept this challenge to their authority.

  6. “Edward Snowden is a national hero and should be immediately issued a a full, free, and absolute pardon for any crimes he has committed or may have committed related to blowing the whistle on secret NSA surveillance programs.”

    Disregard the fact that 95% of what Snowden disclosed had nothing to do with domestic surveillance programs, and that he in fact revealed highly classified, legal, and legitimate collection programs vital to our National Security to our enemies and adversaries.

    1. he in fact revealed highly classified, legal, and legitimate collection programs vital to our National Security to our enemies and adversaries.

      So, how much does the White House pay you?

      1. Even if true, the tactical damage any revelations may have had are extraordinarily offset by the utterly illegal and unconstitutional acts of our government. And this illegality is not limited to the NSA itself.

        Snowden may have crossed some lines or he may not have, but the fact remains that the far bigger and great sin is committed by those who aren’t being held accountable for their crimes.

        1. Well given that the people that hold people accountable for their crimes are some of the people committing the crimes it’s kinda a tricky situation.

        2. So does that mean we shouldn’t hold Snowden accountable for his crimes?

          1. Disclosing constitutional crimes is a crime?

            1. While some may consider Snowden’s disclosure of domestic surveillance programs a “public service”, there is no way what-so-ever to justify his releases of classified information on legitimate, legal, surveillance programs.

          2. Well, let he who is without sin cast the first stone.

            In other words, who in the federal government can be trusted to prosecute him?

          3. He didn’t commit any crimes. NSA agents should be up for prosecution.

            1. Espionage is a crime. Stealing classified documents is a crime. Disclosing classified information to unauthorized persons is a crime. Try again.

              1. What if they made it a crime to tell the press that the NSA was murdering hookers, but you knew that the NSA was murdering hookers. Should you tell or not tell?

      2. Have you stopped beating your wife yet?

        1. So 8 hours, tell us about your 13th tour in Afghanistan when you sniped that south African mercenary from 30,000 yards out.

          1. Nine deployments, not 13 asshole.

    2. I suspect that our actual enemies and adversaries learned far less from Snowden than you seem to believe.

      I suspect that the Russians and the Chinese, for example, have had a pretty good idea what the NSA is up to all along, and that they share that knowledge when it is in their interest to do so with the various satellites and dependents.

  7. First off I feel that Snowden is a whistle blower. And given that he did so illegally under current law I think that exile is a fine punishment and an unused legal punishment that needs to be brought back. Not sure for what crimes other than this.

    1. I’ll go along with exile for Snowden after all the people responsible for what he revealed are exiled to the ice-free Arctic.

      1. Violations of the Consitutions shall be punished by exile. I like it. Although your version is a little too much like the last Batman movie.

  8. I’d feel a whole lot more optimistic about our future if it was Rand Paul, not Ron Paul, arguing for clemency.

    1. No, This is good politics. Let the crazy dad run this up the flagpole and see who salutes. If it doesn’t fly Rand can disavow the idea. I have a feeling you’re going to see more of this.

  9. I wasn’t planning on flying anywhere sooon so…

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