Sex Offender Registry

Alabama Crushes Sex Offender Reform Camp for No Good Reason

|

screen cap

In rural Clanton, Alabama, a pastor named Ricky Martin has operated a camp on his property to help convicted sex offenders reform themselves. Martin's program has since 2010 provided a refuge for over 50 men as they try to assimilate back into society. Not anymore, though. C.J. Robinson, the chief deputy district attorney of Chilton County, thought the group was icky or dangerous or something, so he went out of his way to put an end it.

The Associated Press reports on this incident:

Martin … said he met men with no place to go while serving as a volunteer chaplain in a state prison. He came up with the idea of a sex offender refuge in rural Chilton County, far away from any schools or day care centers, and began screening potential prisoners to live there. …

"We try to live Christian," said Kenny Dark, who served time for rape and has lived in one of the campers. "We go to the church Wednesday and two times on Sunday. We help each other."

Robinson … said Monday he doesn't doubt the sincerity of Martin's religious beliefs. He said no one living at the camp has been arrested for additional sex-related crimes. And, he said, sex offenders do need a place to live.

If not behind a tiny church in an agricultural county with about five dozen people per square mile, then where?

Robinson said he doesn't know. But having so many ex-convicts with similar criminal records in one place is a public safety threat, he said, and Martin doesn't have the specialized training and credentials to deal with them. …

So [Robinson] wrote a bill to shut down the camp by prohibiting two convicted sex offenders from living within 300 feet of each other on the same property unless they are married.

The bill passed in March without any dissent and took effect July 1. Property owners can face up to a $5,000 fine if they violate the law. Great! Let's just recap: Martin had a private system that kept sex offenders away from potential victims while also giving them a community and sense of moral purpose, and Robinson crushed it without any idea of what to do next.

No matter the fact that many communities throughout the U.S. implement similar restrictions, which tend to force sex offenders to either become homeless or move into high density enclaves in cities, where locals then get spooked, and the convicts, despite having done their time, are treated as though they're still dangerous and face severe restrictions on basic things like their ability to walk to a park.

"This might be the only chance I ever have as a prosecutor to try to take steps on the front end," insisted Robinson, and by golly, he just had to take that chance. 

Advertisement

NEXT: Meet the Three (Male, GOP) Politicians Who Support Over-the-Counter Birth Control Pills

Editor's Note: We invite comments and request that they be civil and on-topic. We do not moderate or assume any responsibility for comments, which are owned by the readers who post them. Comments do not represent the views of Reason.com or Reason Foundation. We reserve the right to delete any comment for any reason at any time. Report abuses.

  1. It’s almost like they want these guys to reoffend.

    Actually, scratch that. I’m about 99% sure they do want these guys to reoffend, because then they can demand more power.

  2. Yeah, much better to scatter these guys all over the place. No way that could go wrong.

  3. [unless they are married.]

    Solution seems simple.

      1. Alabama FTL

        ROLL TURD ROLL!

  4. Does he have room for 5 year olds who drop trou on the playground?

  5. “This might be the only chance I ever have as a prosecutor to try to take steps on the front end.”

    Well, I don’t really understand your quaint expression “try to take steps on the front end”, C.J., but do hope this was your last chance, if you catch my drift.

    1. I believe he was trying to say that he stepped on his dick.

      1. Look at the photo, Warty. There’s no way.

        1. He looks like he could be into having it stepped on. I just assume all cases like these are projection. He got so ashamed of getting off at the thought of all those deviants having a good time doing horrible things to each other that he just “had to do something”.

        2. That photo says sheep-fucker to me.

  6. Shorter Robinson: “I had to do SOMETHING.”

    1. Well, thank Gawd Almighty that SOMETHING has been done. For the children.

  7. C.J. Robinson, the chief deputy district attorney

    only chance I ever have as a prosecutor

    What political office is he starting to run for?

    1. This

      Motherfucking piece of shit son of a bitch. He doesn’t care anything about anybody, this is about getting legislation passed “for the chilluns” so he can tout it in the next election.

      I want him to get caught taking a piss in public in flagrante delicto and convicted as a sex offender.

  8. I guess pastor Ricky Martin won’t be living la vida loca any more, lol

    Imsurprisednobodythoughtofthisjokealready.com

  9. “… he met men with no place to go while serving as a volunteer chaplain in a state prison. He came up with the idea of a sex offender refuge in rural Chilton County, far away from any schools or day care center…”

    ..’police became suspicious when they noted that trails leading to the camp had been littered with candy, and that a number of new ‘playgrounds’ had been built into the woods nearby…’

  10. People like Debra Morrison, who lives beside the small, nondenominational church. Some of her windows look out at the campers.

    “I’m just glad it’s over,” said Morrison, her young granddaughter at her side.

    She could see them!! Ms Morrison is a primitive moron.

  11. “Martin’s one-acre tract just outside Clanton, a town of about 8,700”

    That doesn’t sound particularly rural.

  12. A religious guy puts his money where his mouth is. And he and his wife lived among those offenders – doing that requires some commitment.

    This isn’t some judge letting a criminal free, in the assurance that at least the criminal won’t be coming near the judge’s house! It’s real commitment.

    Now, I don’t know if it will “cure” these offenders, but it feeds and houses them.

  13. Well at least the next time I drive to Florida I don’t have to worry about getting lost while looking for a Waffle House and running out of gas at the gates of Camp Manrape (motto: Wharty Macht Frei)

    1. looking for a Waffle House in Alabama?

      1. It’s my experience that if you walk into buildings in Alabama at random, you can find a Waffle House in an average of two minutes.

        1. It’s kind of like the Dunkin’ Donuts ratio in New England.

  14. In rural Clanton, Alabama, a pastor named Ricky Martin has operated a camp on his property to help convicted sex offenders reform themselves by peeing on them.

  15. He’s not even pretending. This is FYTW, straight up.

  16. But having so many ex-convicts with similar criminal records in one place…
    You mean like jail?

    1. Heh, good one.

  17. The dude in the photo is an impressive collection of congenital defects.

  18. C.J. Robinson with the requisite ‘Bama bangs. There is a reason stereotypes persist.

  19. I have fought against this bill numerous times since founding ReFORM-AL in 2010. I butted heads with the segregationist State Rep. Kurt Wallace, who tried many times to pass a statewide “anti-clustering” bill, which would have negatively impacted thousands of registered people across the state. I succeeded in organizing efforts against Wallace and his puppet CJ Robinson (I even recorded one of the committee hearings and posted it on my blog).

    This year, Wallace tried again to pass an anti-cluster law, and again I headed him off at the pass. This was an election year, and Wallace was facing some stiff competition and the powerful AEA was backing Wallace’s opponent. So Wallace, anticipating this was his absolutely final chance to pass his anti-cluster law, made a backroom deal in the legislature to pass a countywide anti-cluster bill just for his home state.

    Alabama is not known for being expedient, but this went from first reading to governor’s signature in less than 12 full business days. The public was NEVER notified of this bill, especially watchdog groups like ReFORM-AL, which had monitored the state legislature site all session waiting for Wallace’s statewide version of the bill to reach a committee meeting (it never did).

    Too bad Pastor Martin didn’t speak up on the many occasions the media contacted him. May the idiots in Clanton enjoy their false sense of security and Kurt Wallace enjoys job hunting (he was voted out of office).

Please to post comments

Comments are closed.