Puppycide

Baltimore Cop Slits Dog's Throat, Gets Charged with Animal Cruelty

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an hero
via WRIC

It looks like a cop in Baltimore won't be getting away with killing a dog in the line of duty. WRIC, the ABC affiliate in Richmond, Virginia, reports:

Officer Jeffrey Bolger is charged with felony animal cruelty and has been suspended without pay.

Police say Bolger, along with other officers, responded to a woman who said she'd been bitten by a dog. Police say the dog, a 7-year-old Shar Pei, had already been secured with a dog pole when Bolger allegedly pulled out a knife and slit the dog's throat.

Police say the dog didn't appear to be posing any threat to the cops. Bolger is actually the second Baltimore cop to be charged with animal cruelty this year. In February, Officer Alec Taylor beat and choked to death his girlfriend's seven-month-old dog and then sent her a picture, telling investigators he was tired of cleaning up after the dog. Taylor, too, was suspended without pay but not immediately fired.

Private sector employees in roles that require interaction with the public would almost certainly be fired after being charged with animal cruelty—it would be difficult otherwise for a private company to survive the damage such incidents would cause to its reputation. The Baltimore Police Department (BPD) and its officers have no such worries. The officers' jobs are protected by union contracts, and the BPD has a guaranteed revenue stream from taxpayers. Government is just the things we do together and the sociopaths we hire to do them.

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  1. If they had just shot the dogs, they wouldn’t even be suspended.

  2. Nice alt text, by the way.

    1. But it’s not likely appropriate in this case. Remember when the shame of public scrutiny was enough to get officials to off themselves? I don’t, but I’m told that was once the case.

      1. One look at that fat donut-snarfing psychopath is all you need to tell you he has no sense of shame.

      2. If anything justifies the Emperor Mayor to send someone a sword with a note saying, “You know what to do,” it’s this.

        1. Run through the neighborhoods lopping the heads off housepets?

      3. You’re thinking of Japan.

      4. Used to be scum like this would be locked in a room with his service weapon and one bullet, and encouraged to do the right thing.

        Fuck that. Make him kneel in the middle of the street in front of his house, turn out his family and neighbors at gunpoint, and put a bullet in the back of his head. Then tar the body and leave it hanging on a lamp post for the next two years.

  3. Finally the “New Professionalism”? (is weeding out the psychopaths who enjoy mindless wanton cruelty and would have otherwise found themselves possessing the power of life and death over the citizenry.

    Today is indeed a great day.

  4. “In February, Officer Alec Taylor beat and choked to death his girlfriend’s seven-month-old dog and then sent her a picture, telling investigators he was tired of cleaning up after the dog. Taylor, too, was suspended without pay but not immediately fired.”

    So he was given a time out and procedures were followed?

    I would think they would be afraid of a liability issue in the future.

    If an officer is involved in some case against the city in the future, knowingly having kept someone on the force who’s done something like that to a puppy would be frowned on, I would think, by a potential jury in a civil case against the city.

    1. The prosecutor would get the judge to suppress the puppy testimony as irrelevant to the case.

      1. I think it’s material to the case.

        You kept a policeman on the force who exhibited what many jurors would see as psychotic behavior–strangling a puppy?

        That’s material to a preponderance of the evidence suit against the city for any misconduct this cop may be accused of in the future.

        Looks like a huge liability risk to me.

  5. he was jealous because it had more folds than his fat ass.

  6. Private sector employees in roles that require interaction with the public would almost certainly be fired after being charged with animal cruelty?it would be difficult otherwise for a private company to survive the damage such incidents would cause to its reputation.

    They can be fired even for putting something insulting on a restaurant check, as recently happened. Contrary to popular beliefs about oppressive plutocrats, competitive businesses can make FYTW go only so far.

  7. “I done kilt that dawg real gud! H’yuk!”

    I saw a local cop the other day that was barely taller than the cruiser he was standing beside. He and Judge Derp here would make a fantastic crime-solving team. “Uh, durr. Da dawg did it! Git your slittin’ knife, Jeffy!”

    1. My hometown of Manvel, TX, has 2 cops who are literally midgets. The first time I ever got pulled over, one of them walked up to the window of my Mustang and his face was level with mine. My friend in the passenger seat couldn’t help laughing, and I got my first ticket.

      1. I was once given a Breathalyzer by a state trooper that had to get on his tippy-toes. I’m 5′ 10″.

      2. Entrapment.

    2. If I had to interact with a short cop, I’d be hella worried. Think of joe with a badge to know why.

      1. Short cops scare the shit out of me. I’m not eager to be shot again.

        1. Shot again?

          Dude, were you shot by a cop?

          Fuck.

          1. He was shot by a friend accidentally. I’ll let him describe the damage. It makes me shudder just thinking about it.

    3. My two interactions with cops in recent years have been thus:

      -Tall, handsome FL Statie was polite as could be when giving me a speeding ticket. Even asked if we were “going to the game” (we were passing through Gainesville.
      -Short, old, ugly NC Statie was rude and nasty when issuing me a speeding ticket. In fact, didn’t even give me a fine, instead gave me a citation where I had to hire a lawyer to go to court for me.

  8. are there any unsolved serial killings there?

    1. Yeah. Cruelty to animals a sure sign of a potential psychopath.

      1. Potential?

  9. Every time a cop unnecessarily kills a dog it is just more evidence that they do it simply because cops are, by nature and culture, intensely cruel and uncaring. The fact that they are almost always shielded from any consequences for their abusive behavior removes any incentive for them to be any other way.

    Anyone who thinks that cops can behave this way toward dogs, but still respect the rights of humans, is devoid of common sense. And, just to be clear, cops who defend cops who act like this are just as guilty and just as morally bankrupt.

    1. Yep.

      I just wish I could get the people who are always crying “Why do you just highlight the minority? What about all the good cops out there!” to understand that.

    2. When a cop kills a dog with the expectation of fully getting away with it, that has to be the most positive indicator of sociopathy you could ask for. Of course psychos are going to gravitate to the position. It creates the worst possible incentives.

  10. The Baltimore City police department is essentially just a giant jobs program for the otherwise unemployable. The mistake with this guy was letting him actually go out on the street and work. Maybe now they’ll just stick him in an evidence room or something until he’s ready to retire.

    1. So his uncle said ‘he’s a good kid, just a bit of a mean streak’, and somebody thought: ‘Cop material!’

  11. The mistake with this guy was letting him actually go out on the street and work. Maybe now they’ll just stick him in an evidence room or something until he’s ready to retire.

    I’ve heard they’re seeing if they have an open slot in Animal Control.

  12. Why the fuck is a cop carrying a knife, anyway? When would a cop ever legitimately use a knife? Does Baltimore have particularly tough donuts? Or was it just a drop knife?

    1. Seriously, I don’t find it strange for a cop to have a knife – I can think if several situations of a cop doing a legitimate service or helping someone that doesn’t involve violence, where he might need a knife.

      1. Name one.

        1. Slitting the throat of an allegedly feral cat. Cutting the head off the pet iguana at the house of a suspected pot user. Slicing the blouse and bra off a cuffed female that didn’t give him her number at the traffic stop…

          The list is endless, really.

        2. Cutting a seatbelt to pull someone out of a wrecked car? First thing that came to mind.

          1. Cutting someone out of her seatbelt because she had the temerity to demand a reason for being asked to exit her vehicle during an otherwise routine traffic stop.

          2. There are better tools for that than a knife. And cops have them.

            1. So what? You asked ” When would a cop ever legitimately use a knife? ” and were given a very legitimate example.

              It doesn’t fucking matter that there are “better tools” and frankly, your assumption that “cops have them” is fucking stupid because not ALL cops are gatted up pseudo-military outfits.

              Now stop crying because you made a stupid fucking assertion and got slapped down.

              1. Ah, the Palin’s Buttplug school of “ad hominem, non sequitur, declare victory.” What does this:
                http://www.amazon.com/Seatbelt…..B004TRKBOK

                have to do with “pseudo-military outfits?”
                A knife is a terrible tool for cutting someone out of a seatbelt, which is why police cruisers universally carry tools to break windows and cut seatbelts safely. So no, that is not a legitimate example. Your ridiculously-aggressive tone is far out of line for a rational response to this discussion, so between that and the non sequitur I can only assume you’ve wandered over from Police One.

          3. Got a folding knife with a special tool for this on the butt end.

          4. A cop in my town did this to get a lady out of the car she wrecked into the river while it was sinking.

        3. How about when the cop’s boyfriend threatens to go to the cop’s wife and chief about his being gay?

          Valencia, a University of Missouri junior who was open about his homosexuality, was found dead on a lawn near campus with his throat slit June 5, 2004. The wound was so deep, the medical examiner said, there were knife marks on the spine.

          http://www.cnn.com/2005/LAW/05/23/rios/

    2. Cutting zip ties when releasing an inappropriately detained citi….AHHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA

    3. I’m not at all friendly toward law enforcement, but having a knife is EXTREMELY common for a cop. Or people in society, generally.

      I carry a knife. They’re a handy tool.

      You have a bit of the shrieky gun-grabber thing going on. Just sayin’.

  13. That guy is older – probably been a cop for decades – think how many officers that people call “good cops” worked right next to this sociopath, witness similar him having similar events and tendencies and didn’t report them. Those that just overlooked this weirdo are not “good cops”.

    1. Amen. In a job like law enforcement, you will attract an element that wants to abuse the powers the public has given them. It’s up to the others to weed them out – and the others aren’t interested.

  14. Government is just the things we do together and the sociopaths we hire to do them.

    Very nice.

    We all have to contribute our fair share of the ruthless violence.

  15. When I just started out as a lawyer, I did a “Wills for Heroes” event to get some pro bono hours. It seems like a decent program, and the people I helped seemed alright. It’s a shame stories like this are going to prevent me from ever doing it again.

  16. Hit and run appropriately named. Hit’em and run before the facts come in.

    First rule of police actions: never trust the press reports.

    Second rule of police actions: those who opine based upon remote sensing (press reports) are as trustworthy as my Rottweiler with a bone-in ham.

    He can be trusted because he knows I would slit his throat if he did. And I feed him kittens.

    1. +1 Morgan Fairchild

  17. Thugs in blue. Are they all psychos or just the majority?

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