Hemp

More States Moving to Legalize Industrial Hemp Farming

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D-Kuru/Wikimedia

Though you can purchase hemp foods and products in America, growing hemp—the non-psychoactive cousin of marijuana—has been illegal here for decades. But as part of this year's farm bill, Congress approved the growing of hemp by universities and state agriculture departments, for research purposes, in states that permit it. 

It's a small step, but it's something. Since the new farm bill's passage, states where hemp farming was totally prohibited have been moving quickly to loosen their rules. 

Overall, 25 states have considered industrial hemp legislation in 2014, according to Vote Hemp. Thirteen states—California, Colorado, Hawaii, Indiana, Kentucky, Maine, Montana, Nebraska, North Dakota, Oregon, Utah, Vermont and West Virginia—now allow industrial hemp farming for research and/or commercial purposes. 

Hawaii passed a bill this week authorizing the University of Hawaii to grow and research hemp. New York is currently considering a bill to allow universities to grow hemp for research purposes, and similar bills have been under consideration recently in Illinois, Maryland, Michigan, Minnesota, South Carolina, and Washington.  

Other states have legalized growing hemp for commercial as well as research purposes (though this puts them in conflict with federal laws). In March, Indiana passed a bill allowing farmers to grow hemp for research or commercial uses. Tennessee's legislature passed a similar bill in April, which is waiting on approval from Gov. Bill Haslam. A South Carolina version passed the Senate and is awaiting further action in the House. 

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  1. It’s a small step, but it’s something.

    Small doesn’t even begin to explain how minuscule this actually is. The feds allowing people that are the right people to do some small-scale farming of a product that has essentially no discernible negatives attached to it should be mocked mercilessly.

  2. Amy Wong: [At the Dudes for the Legalization of Hemp booth] So, is it true that you can make all kinds of shirts and ropes out of hemp?

    Stoned Guy: Dave’s not here, man.

    Amy Wong: I also hear hemp makes great shampoo.

    Stoned Guy: It does? No way! I gotta check out this brochure.

  3. What always amazes me about this is that anyone believes that allowing industrial hemp farming would make it easier to grow marijuana. If you are growing pot, the last thing you want anywhere near you is a big field of mixed sex hemp.

    But there are people who think it’s a good idea to spend money eradicating ditch weed every year, so I shouldn’t be so surprised.

  4. Dude that looks like its gonna be good man.

    http://www.GoGoAnon.tk

  5. How much research is there to be done?

  6. toasted hemp seeds are delicious – the real, whole kind, not that stupid kernel-only health food shit. It’s a traditional Persian snack called “shahdoonay” (spelled phonetically as best I can)

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