Second Amendment

Connecticut Pols Blame Underwhelming Gun Registration Figures on Postal Glitches, Propose Amnesty

|

AR-15
M62

Even before the Connecticut deadline passed for registering semi-automatic so-called "assault weapons" and high-capacity magazines that can hold more than ten rounds, it was pretty obvious that noncompliance would be high. That's no shocker, since noncompliance with gun registration laws and other restrictions tends to be very high, in the U.S. and abroad. But if you needed any further confirmation that state officials are a little disapponted with the turnout, try this on for size: Blaming postal snafus, Governor Malloy and state lawmakers are already calling for an amnesty for scofflaws and a do-over on the effort to register scary-looking firearms and their magazines.

According to counts conducted at the close of registration period with the end of 2013, Connecticut gun owners registered 50,016 "assault weapons" and 38,290 high-capacity magazines. Swell. But how does that compare to the number that were supposed to be registered under the law?

As it turns out, the Connecticut Office of Legislative Research looked into just that issue in 2011. The numbers they came up with were guesstimates, at best, but those guesstimates … ummm … somewhat overshadow the number of registrations. Drawing on figures from the National Shooting Sports Foundation, the trade association for the firearms industry, the OLR says that the number of high-capacity magazines "could be in the tens of millions" with "over 2.4 million large capacity magazines in Connecticut that originated at the retail level."

Those magazines are a mix of handgun and rifle accessories, and largely extrapolated from relatively firm gun numbers based on National Instant Criminal Background Check System records. In terms of rifles that use high-capacity magazines—the sort of long guns likely to be classified as "assault weapons"—the OLR came up with 372,000.

That's millions of magazines, against 38,000 registrations, and almost 400,000 rifles, with 50,000 bits of paperwork filed. Hence, calls for an amnesty and extended registration period. The U.S. Postal Service must have really dropped the ball. Or, maybe, people are just tired of control-freak politiicans who build on and abuse every intrusive policy they impose.

Amnesty. Yeah, good luck with that.

Advertisement

NEXT: Eric Cantor Says "Obamacare is on Borrowed Time"

Editor's Note: We invite comments and request that they be civil and on-topic. We do not moderate or assume any responsibility for comments, which are owned by the readers who post them. Comments do not represent the views of Reason.com or Reason Foundation. We reserve the right to delete any comment for any reason at any time. Report abuses.

  1. Most people were smart enough to understand that this was about creating a database in preparation for confiscation, and that when it finally reached the SCOTUS this insane law was going to be struck down and they stayed away. The funny thing was the article claiming that 95% of the people they estimated would have to register soemthing all filed on Dec 31st, and thus, they missed the window, which is why they need this idiotic amnesty plan.

    Watch this also crash and burn. Smart people will never tell these gun grabbers they have stuff that the gun grabbers want to take, unless they are ready to lose their things.

    1. It was completely unsurprising to me that this would happen. Every person I know in CT with guns, from family members to friends, would utterly ignore this requirement. Without even thinking twice.

      1. So…your contact list is a good start for a confiscation drive?

        1. Do you actually think I ever talk to my family? What contact list?

          1. It’s like he’s never heard of the class action restraining order!

            1. I know, right?

      2. Dude, someone has been looking for you since yesterday…

        1. Is is someone whose posts mysteriously vanished, maybe?

        2. O Rly? I don’t see anyone.

          1. Mary couldn’t stop talking about you last night and this morning. The posts seem to have disappeared in the last hour.

            1. Allow me then to step in as a surrogate…

            2. What a mystery.

            3. That’s funny, I didn’t see anything. What a shame.

              1. After it became apparent that the Seahawks were going to win (early 1st quarter), she showed up here and expressed great concern about how you were going to celebrate…

            4. Mary couldn’t stop talking about you last night and this morning.

              Can you imagine how nicer things would have been had Episiarch not crushed Mary’s attempts to flirt, like Mary crushed that Bisson Friche that made the mistake of hopping onto the couch while she was up getting her sixth helping of mac and cheese.

              1. Are you asking him to take one for the team?

              2. It’s true. She only really got nasty once we rejected her insane attempts to be part of the Kool Kids Klub. So all of this is Epi’s fault.

                1. I’m having a hard time holding the thoughts “Episiarch” and “Kool Kids Klub” in my head at the same time.

                2. So all of this is Epi’s fault.

                  What isn’t?

                  1. That’s rich coming from you, nicole. As the worst, I’d think you’d have some sense of humility. Oh wait, you’re the worst at that too.

                    1. Humility about my own superlativity? Um, why?

                    2. Well…because it’s a negative superlative?

                      You might have me here. Damn it!

                  2. What isn’t?

                    Can Epi be Epi’s own fault?

                    1. He borrowed Warty’s timesuit for that one.

                    2. Well, he is his own grandpa.

                    3. I did do the nasty in the pasty!

                  3. So all of this is Epi’s fault.

                    What isn’t?

                    Epi’s mom?

            5. Mary and Epi sitting in a tree…

  2. If I lived there I’d no-doubt blow this off, but then on the flip side, I’d be extremely paranoid about taking the gun anywhere including the range.

  3. That’s millions of magazines, against 38,000 registrations, and almost 400,000 rifles, with 50,000 bits of paperwork filed.

    Damn those organized killers!

  4. Connecticut gun owners registered 50,016 “assault weapons” and 38,290 high-capacity magazines.

    Serious question: How many of those registrations were submitted by Elmer Fudd, Hugh G. Rection, et al.?

  5. Hey J.D., I finally got around to reading your book. It was fun. Write more of them.

    1. I am going to buy the book based upon Warty’s review. I do not know if that is good or bad.

  6. …the OLR says that the number of high-capacity magazines “could be in the tens of millions” with “over 2.4 million large capacity magazines in Connecticut that originated at the retail level.”

    Even taking into account multiples, that seems like a lot of non-compliant gun owners. Don’t they vote?

    1. They din’t have a chance to vote on this, it was decided by already-elected politicians. However, they might pay at the polls next election, but a lot of people don’t really care about voting and just ignore these bullshit laws.

      Non-compliance is rampant there. Do you think a town of 4,000 people that has to pay for all its own plowing and all other bureaucratic functions (remember, there is no county government in CT; none) has the money to send a building inspector around to bother people? How are they going to send police to check for gun compliance when they don’t have a police force? The town government, especially in the smaller towns, is so weak that it can mostly be ignored, and the state rarely bothers them either.

      1. I don’t know the demos of Connecticut but it doesn’t seem like it would have a large disparity of blue urbanites dominating red hicks like other states with gun grabbing policies suddenly in place.

        My dream has always been for these statists when they see their mission come to fruition paying a huge political price and having their unconstitutional legislation tossed, thus losing power for naught. (Only half of that happened with Obamacare.)

        1. Well, that actually used to be reflected in the gun laws. Of the surrounding states (MA, NY, NJ, RI), CT had by far the best and most lenient gun laws, including permissive shall-issue (as opposed to restrictive). These new laws took CT from “hey, not bad” to “what the fuck”?

          It is entirely possible the politicians will pay. However, if most people are just ignoring this shit, they may not even bother with voting. And you are correct that there aren’t big urban centers to skew stuff. Most of the population, especially the more concerned voting kind, live in towns.

          We’ll see.

  7. I hate snow. That is all.

    1. It rained here last night for the first time this winter. The drought is over!!!

      1. Our 4th snow storm of the year with 8+ inches.

        California can suck it.

        1. We might have to. There’s talk of the water supplies running out soon.

          1. I think that’s mostly Northern CA, I’ve heard our reservoirs are still doing pretty well. Weren’t they building an experimental desal plant in Redondo? Where is my drinkable seawater?

            1. Yeah, rape the oceans because you’re too good to drink Gatorade.

              1. I’m not sure electrolytes are what plants want.

                1. Well then you can cock off to me when you are sure.

                2. I’m not sure electrolytes are what plants want.

                  You’re thinking of Brawndo.

          2. There’s talk of the water supplies running out soon.

            Yeah, that’s a bit disconcerting. But warm weather locations are looking good to me now and I’m feeling jealous after plowing the driveway, drought or no drought.

          3. Everyone knows we Californians are all dirty hippies. We don’t need water. Just pump up the patchouli supply.

            1. Especially since we switched to CO River water. Too many minerals.

          4. We might have to. There’s talk of the water supplies running out soon.

            I’ve got water…

            I could…..sell ya some. $25/gal sound about right to you?

            1. I’d rather drink Jesse’s seawater.

      2. Bah, I was on the 405 doing 95 when it started raining, traffic slowed to 45mph.

        You can still drive fast in the rain, Californians, just give the car ahead of you more space.

        1. Please, it rains 200 days a year in Florida and most of my state-mates haven’t figured that out.

          1. In my part of Virginia it rains 128 days for 47 inches of water. And they dare talk about droughts.

            1. We used to listen to all of the drought propaganda when I lived in Santa Cruz as a kid (the area is temperate rainforest). I had no idea how bad conditions were in the rest of the state until I moved to LA.

              1. One of the stupidest ones I’ve ever heard was in the mid 90s when all of the environmental BS started really ramping up. There were people trying to get water usage laws passed around here, claiming that we were running out of water and that watering your lawn, filling a pool, taking a shower, etc was going to dry up all of our usable water. A few communities actually started enforcing water restrictions because of them.

                The absolute stupid… “here” refers to the area on the south shore of Lake Erie. Yeah, we’re not gonna run out of water any time soon.

                1. Not likely. And VA gets more rain than Seattle.

        2. Have you ever had your car hydroplane in the rain? I have. Scary shit.

          1. There was a stretch of my drive to high school that would flood and I’d gun it near the flood zone to hydroplane across, but it was low traffic and high visibility.

            I wouldn’t recommend speeding on the freeway in the rain, but everyone slowed down unnecessarily while failing to increase their following distance. Even if people just get into no-injury fender benders it ends up snarling traffic.

          2. When Goodyear came out with those “all-weather” tires with no water grooves in the 1980s I hydroplaned a 1973 Fury III off the side of a mountain in western North Carolina. Those goddamned tires hydroplaned at 45 stinking miles per hour!

            I never bought another set of Goodyears. I don’t think I ever will.

            1. Funny – I won’t buy Firestones because they totally fucked Ford on the whole Wilderness AT/Explorer debacle. That includes “no Bridgestones on my motorcycles” (Bridgestone owns Firestone, of course).

              So I run Dunlops on all my bikes – which are made by Goodyear.

              So we maybe cancel each other out?

              And, yeah, hydroplaning SUCKS. It’s way worse on a motorcycle, BTW…

              1. I can imagine. I rode a motorcycle in college as cheap transportation, but I rarely went fast enough to worry about hydroplaning.

                Until recently I was a big Michelin fan, but as their prices climbed their quality descended. I’m happy with the Firestones on the pickup and the SUV. So yeah, we’re cancelling each other out. But if I start having problems again count on me switching.

        3. You can still drive fast in the rain, Californians, just give the car ahead of you more space.

          So they’re like the retarded people in Atlanta who can’t drive in 2 inches of snow.

          1. Or like the Chicago morons who die in heat waves rather than take a cold shower.

        4. Why do Californians insist upon putting the word “the” in front of their highway designations?

          You were on 405.

          OR

          You were on I-405.

          You weren’t on THE 405.

          1. I think it’s mostly a SoCal thing.

            Why do people in other parts of the country insist on calling soda “pop” “coke” or “seltzah”?

          2. Probably transplants from Ohio

          3. It’s a shortened version of “the 405 freeway.” No one refers to it as Interstate 405 (which it technically isn’t anyway). Same thing applies to the 5, the 10, the 101, the 210, the 118, the 33, the 58, the Pear Blossom…

          4. I-405 is in Portland. THE 405 is in LA.

        5. I thought rain on CA roads was a bit more dangerous due to infrequent rain allowing buildup of oil and rubber, which make for exceptionqlly slick roqds when the rain finally comes. At least I was told that by my SIL who used to live in Redondo Beach.

          1. That’s an old wives tale.

            1. It sounds reawonable, but that’s how unscientific crap spreads, I guess.

            2. BTW, while I don’t think I’d ever be able to live in CA with your political.and. tax climate (my favorite.hobby is.basically illegal there) , I can understand why you guys put up with it. Two of the most relaxing weeks.of.my life were spent working in Arroyo Grande/Pismo Beach. The view from my hotel on the.beach there was amazing.

              1. What is your favorite hobby? Running a Foie Gras factory?

                1. Collecting and shooting machineguns.

                  1. You pretty much have to start a film company to pull that off here. I have plenty of firepower, but none of it is NFA.

                    1. Yeah, I know. Dr. Girlfriend had a job offer at Google a few years ago but turned it down partly because we would have had to move to the Bay area, and I would have had to sell my collection or.store it out ofbstate.

                    2. Sell it? No way. Storage locker in Reno.

                    3. If I ever move out West, it will be to a place I can walk out the back door and do.a.mag dump. I don’t like the idea of keeping a collection remotely.

                    4. This is why I am rooting for the Northern CA secession movement.

            3. I always assumed it was because our roads aren’t all structured very well for drainage. The 91 is a mess after it rains, or at least it was before the last round of construction finished.

              1. They cut the grooves into the freeways here just like everywhere else. I think the problem is idiots letting couches and other junk fall off the back of their trucks, and it blocks the drains. Elsewhere, there are road crews that check for that sort of thing. Here, Caltrans will drive right by a 3 piece sofa blocking a drainage culvert…

                1. My neighbor works for Caltrans, and you’ll be delighted to learn the reason they don’t clear those drains. If they want one cleared they have to call the state enviro-weenies first and have them come by to check whether any endangered or protected species have taken up residence in the mad-made, concrete drainage culvert. It takes months for the paperwork to go through. Same thing with rock slides. If rocks fall down the hill and land on the road, Caltrans has to scoop them up and take them to a landfill. It is expressly forbidden for them to just shove the rocks off the other side of the road, where they would have gone anyway if the road wasn’t there.

                  1. Jesus, you can’t make this shit up. Why put in drains at all?

                  2. Thanks for making me stabby today, MS.

          2. You don’t want to surf immediately after the first rain, but that’s about it.

  8. I don’t know if we’re looking at widespread defiance, here.

    I’d like to think so, but I doubt it.

    I think it’s a little like Obamacare – there are people being defiant, but there are also a lot of people who just don’t have enough wavelength for this nonsense.

    The regulatory state has grown too vast. Its dictates shift with the wind. It still manages to extract compliance with systems that are of comparatively long standing (pay your taxes, get a driver’s license) or that affect a small number of motivated, informed, and energetic people (regulatory changes impacting specific industries) but it plain old falls down on the job when it tries to impose anything broad-based and new. If they stopped making kids register for the draft for a decade, I’m pretty much convinced they could never successfully start it up again, now. Without institutional momentum, they fall down on their own faces, again and again.

    1. ^^THIS^^

      In Minneapolis, if you install (or have installed) a furnace, a water heater, etc., you are supposed to call the city inspections office to schedule a guy to come out and inspect the installation. When you call the number, you get a recorded message that tells you you can only talk to someone between 7:00 and 8:30 am. And no, you can’t leave a message. twenty years ago, I said, “Fuck that.” and have every time since. And nothing else happened.

      1. People like you are the.reason furnaces explode and burn down entire blocks full of apartment houses. Safety inspectors and urban planners are the onlybthing keeping you from murdering everyone else.

        /joe

  9. So what if nobody complies? The ruling class is more secure when everybody has a crime waiting to be discovered.

    1. Exactly. The purpose of this measure was not to get people to register their firearms, but to confiscate firearms from people who failed to register them.

      1. Off the top of my head I can think of several libtards who would eagerly turn in their fellow citizens for not registering their icky guns.

        1. Which is exactly why I have guns.

  10. is “Amnesty” just another way of saying, “Stupid Law isn’t Working”?

  11. So I guess this is one of those situations where, like Obamacare, it was the law of the land until it became apparent nobody was going to follow it, rendering the fearless leader in genuine danger of having nobody behind him, so he just decided to ignore the parts that people didn’t like. If I were in CT I would make a huge stink about the amnesty. I’d demand that no amnesty or extended registration be granted, period, no exceptions. Either enforce the law or repeal the law. If it’s so bad that nobody will comply, then maybe, just maybe, it shouldn’t be on the books.

  12. Non Registration is in a short sentence …Obama and state government go screw yourselves. You are violating our 2nd Amendment rights.Plain and simple.

  13. The only way they can enforce this law is to go house to house kicking in doors. At first that would get people killed, shortly after that starts there will be LEOs and politicians getting shot as well. If they are going to kill you anyway you might as well take a couple with you, what do you have to lose?

Please to post comments

Comments are closed.