Second Amendment

Take a Grain of Salt With Those "Long" Connecticut Gun Registration Lines

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AR-15
M62

Connecticut news outlets report long lines as the deadline looms for state residents to undergo the registration process that will magically render their firearms and standard-capacity magazines legal, in contrast to those evil, forbidden, yet identical, guns and mags that remain unregistered after the turn of the year. Thousands of registrations have been recorded, yet whether that counts as substantial compliance with the law depends on something that's unknowable: how many objects subject to the law are in the state. As I've written before, however, defiance of such laws is the historical norm.

According to NBC Connecticut:

Long lines extended again from Connecticut State Police headquarters in Middletown Tuesday morning as gun owners raced to comply with new gun laws that go into effect on Jan. 1.

New gun laws were enacted after the tragic shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown in December 2012 that took the lives of 20 first graders and six staff members. Tuesday is the year-end deadline for gun owners to register certain assault weapons as well as high-capacity magazines. …

As of Christmas, 25,000 people had registered assault weapons and 17,000 registered high-capacity magazines, Malloy said Monday. That number is sure to rise after hundreds of people waited in line on the final two days of 2013, rushing to meet the deadline.

25,000 registered "assault weapons" with hundreds more to go? But Governor Andrew Cuomo in (much larger) neighboring New York estimates the number of similar weapons in his state at one million, while a widely ignored 1991 ban in New Jersey on the arbitrarily defined category of weapons was estimated to apply to 100,000-300,000 such guns, before the politics-fueled buying frenzies of the last two decades.

I'm willing to bet that 25,000 registered assault weapons represents a minority of the firearms that are legally required to be registered under the law. Considering that the vast majority of "assault weapons" use magazines restricted under the new law, and that most people purchase multiple magazines for their rifles, 17,000 registrations in that category should be seen as wildly underwhelming.

That shouldn't be surprising at all, since defiance of registration laws, let alone confiscations, is the historical norm in the United States, Australia, Canada, France, Germany … Politicians made that particular bed by being repeatedly untrustworthy, abusing registration records to seize recorded weapons, or otherwise letting even tolerable governments degenerate into the sort of regimes that make you wish you had a gun.

In a white paper on the results of gun control efforts around the world, Gun Control and the Reduction of the Number of Arms, Franz Csaszar, a professor of criminology at the University of Vienna, Austria, wrote, "non-compliance with harsher gun laws is a common event." He estimated that Germans registered 3.2 million of 17-20 million affected weapons when registration was implemented in that country in 1972. Austrians, he says, registered perhaps a quarter to a third of weapons subject to a similar law in 1996.

When California imposed "assault weapon" registration in 1990, The New York Times reported "only about 7,000 weapons of an estimated 300,000 in private hands in the state have been registered" at the time the grace period came to a close.

So take those "long lines" in Connecticut with a grain of salt. Government officials are capable of turning a dinner party into an extended, bureaucratic ordeal. But they can't make compliance with intrusive and repressive laws seem like a goood idea.

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  1. Molon labe, bitches.

  2. I’m willing to bet that 25,000 registered assault weapons represents a minority of the firearms that are legally required to be registered under the law.

    As someone who grew up there and knew multiple households with personal collections that contained multiple “illegal” guns well before the new laws, I would back you on that bet.

    1. There I was completely wasting,
      Out of work and down.
      All inside it’s so frustrating
      As I drift from town to town.
      Feel as though nobody cares
      If I live or die.
      So I might as well begin to put some action in my life.

      Breaking the law, breaking the law.
      Breaking the law, breaking the law.
      Breaking the law, breaking the law.
      Breaking the law, breaking the law.

      So much for the golden future,
      I can’t even start.
      I’ve had every promise broken,
      There’s anger in my heart.
      You don’t know what it’s like,
      You don’t have a clue.
      If you did you’d find yourselves doing the same thing, too.

      Breaking the law, breaking the law.
      Breaking the law, breaking the law.
      Breaking the law, breaking the law.
      Breaking the law, breaking the law.

      You don’t know what it’s like!!
      we we wo we wo [police car sounds]
      Breaking the law, breaking the law.
      Breaking the law, breaking the law.
      Breaking the law, breaking the law.
      Breaking the law, breaking the law.

      Breaking the law, breaking the law.
      Breaking the law, breaking the law.
      Breaking the law, breaking the law.
      Breaking the law, breaking the law.

      1. NEEDS MOAR CHAPS ‘N’ LEATHER VESTS

  3. But they can’t make compliance with intrusive and repressive laws seem like a goood idea.

    Depends upon how they intend to enforce it… If the choice is compliance or imprisonment or death, it might be a good idea to play along or better yet, GTFO.

  4. I had no idea about the California assault weapons registration – that’s hilarious. I moved there in 1992 to go back to school. A LA County deputy and his family lived downstairs from us. I told him I was a Marine Reservist and had a rifle and asked if I needed to do anything – he told me not to worry about it. He also said that his wife and kids would be visiting us while he was away if there was another riot.

  5. That gun is so scary I almost peed my pants just looking at a picture of it.

  6. if you can convince people to give up part of their voluntarily, it’s much less difficult to take what is left of it.

    1. “…part of their liberty voluntarily…”

      what the hell

  7. Gun registration is important. Not because it makes anyone safer. Thinking that is just plain silly. It’s just important because the government needs to know everything about you. It’s just like mass surveillance. It doesn’t make anyone safer either. But it serves the same function. Knowledge is power and you crazy people (ie: the entire U.S. population) need to be controlled (for your own good, of course).

  8. Here’s a very insightful analysis of the Sandy Hook massacre, by sociologist Randall Collins. He states:

    …the most distinctive clue that someone is planning a rampage killing is that they lead a secret life of amassing weapons and scripting the massacre. The point is not that they acquire a lot of guns; many people do that. But mass killers keep them secret; their life becomes obsessed with plans and fantasies of the attack, and energized with the excitement of being able to dupe other people about their secret life. Foremost among those who are duped is their family.

    He blogged about it here http://sociological-eye.blogspot.com/ and here http://sociological-eye.blogsp…..chive.html

    1. The Sandy Hook killer didn’t “amass” any guns, secret or otherwise. They belonged to his mother, and she was open about them.

      Navy Yard killer bought one shotgun, openly.

      Arapahoe HS killer, also one shotgun, bought openly.

      Virginia Tech killer openly bought two handguns.

      Just off the top of my head.

  9. I learned all I needed to know about gun registration from Red Dawn.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3OaF-j8x5Vc

  10. “A well-regulated (functioning) militia (armed citizenry), being necessary to the security of a free state, the right of the people (in contrast to said militia) to keep and bear arms (weapons intended for fighting), shall not be infringed (restricted).” – 2nd Amendment, US Constitution.

    I added period correct definitions, not that I needed to here. That being said, I do not see the words “registration/documentation” anywhere. Weird.

  11. Then there was the reporter from CNN that looked like she got hit between the eyes while doing an interview. Asked a guy standing on line what he thought about having to register his guns. His answer was along the line of “I am betting there are no criminals on this line to register their guns”. THAT was when the reporters eyes glazed over.

    1. Too bad he didn’t add why. Criminals (felons) can’t be prosecuted for not registering their firearms. Haynes V U.S..

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