Obamacare

One Third of Obamacare's Federal Exchange Enrollments Are Buggy

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Whitehouse.gov

Since shortly after the October 1 launch of Obamacare's exchanges, we've been hearing complaints from health insurers about the transmission of enrollment data through the federally run insurance portal, HealthCare.gov. It's not coming through correctly, industry officials have said. In some cases, it's not coming through at all. 

But until now, there's been little indication of how many people were affected by the problems. According to The Washington Post, the errors are pervasive. 

The errors cumulatively have affected roughly one-third of the people who have signed up for health plans since Oct. 1, according to two government and health-care industry officials. The White House disputed the figure but declined to provide its own.

The mistakes include failure to notify insurers about new customers, duplicate enrollments or cancellation notices for the same person, incorrect information about family members, and mistakes involving federal subsidies. The errors have been accumulating since HealthCare.gov opened two months ago, even as the Obama administration has been working to make it easier for consumers to sign up for coverage, the government and industry officials said.

Government sources tell the Post that so far about 149,000 people have signed up for plans within the federal exchange system, which covers 36 states. More have picked plans within the state-run exchanges. But two months after launch, enrollment totals still lag far behind the administration's goal of 500,000 private insurance sign-ups for just the month of October. 

And in part because of the transmission errors, many of the people who have signed up are still not fully enrolled, according to the Post:

The errors, if not corrected, mean that tens of thousands of consumers are at risk of not having coverage when the insurance goes into effect Jan. 1, because the health plans they picked do not yet have accurate information needed to send them a bill. Under the 2010 law designed to reshape the health-care system, consumers are not considered to have coverage unless they have paid at least the first monthly insurance premium.

In theory, discrepancies between federal enrollment records and data received by insurers is supposed to be run through a monthly comparison process. But that can't happen yet. As the Post notes, "The part of the online system that is supposed to perform this comparison, known as 'reconciliation,' is not yet built, according to government officials."

NEXT: White House Says 1 Million People Visited Obamacare Site on Monday

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  1. “We didn’t build that!”

    1. Appropriate that they own the Vikings, they did raid the public purse after all.

  2. “The White House disputed the figure but declined to provide its own.”

    In other words “Nuh-Uh!”

    Having a conversation with this administration is like talking to a rebellious teenager. They have an almost complete misunderstanding about even the most basic concepts and you cant get a straight answer about anything. Everything is non-answers, obfuscations and misdirections.

    Exactly what you should expect from people who have zero practical experience in the real world.

    1. if credibility were a feline quality, seems this administration would have exhausted its nine-unit supply.

    2. Having a conversation with this administration is like talking to a rebellious teenager.

      “How was your day?”

      “Fine.”

      “What’d you do?”

      “Nothin’.”

      “Can’t you say anything more substantial?”

      “Well, the Republicans dispute Obamacare but decline to provide a plan of their own, so what the hell do you want from me?!”

    3. Exactly what you should expect from people who have zero practical experience in the real world.

      You mean managing a major industry is not as easy as managing a campaign for a popularity contest? Impossible!

  3. I agree with the Republicans: we should postpone Block Yo Mammacare for a year so we can fix it more betterer.

    1. ^^Who is this fuck?^^

      1. I’m guessing its yet another variant of the prog-troll whose M.O. is to make silly statements with shades of racism in them to give the impression that somehow libertoid boards like H&R are chock-full-o’ secessionist teabagging racist wreckers etc.

        Or maybe they think they’re fucking funny, and don’t realize how retarded they seem to everyone else.

        I remain pretty amazed at the number of people who continue to press this idea that the ‘status quo’ of the health insurance business prior to the ACA was some kind of nightmarish gulag of post-apocalyptic exploitation and denial, and that criticism of the ACA is somehow a nihilistic desire to return to this ‘unacceptable’ state of affairs.

        They seems to have trouble reconciling this “law of the land” shit with, “why doesn’t it work?”

  4. We’re saving BIYYOONS!
    http://talkingpointsmemo.com/l…..-projected

    1. Of course they’re going to save billions. No one’s going to have insurance or health care.

    2. From that link:
      “It still remains unclear if Obamacare’s cost-control mechanisms will work effectively when the economy improves and health spending rises once again.”
      So, no, the projected (not actual) savings are a result of the economy, not O’care.

      “Roughly 100,000 people signed up for insurance last month using the troubled online federal health exchange HealthCare.gov.”
      This would be an administration lie?

  5. So no one yet knows how many people actually HAVE INSURANCE through this mess?
    Not ‘signed one’, not ‘clicked through’, not ‘selected a policy’; none of that Chad crap. How many people actually have a policy that allows them to go to a medical provider and get covered services?

    1. Sorry, Sevo, that’s classified. National security. We’re sure you understand.

      1. That’s classified “Politically Damaging: Need to Know”, and no one needs to know.

    2. The answer to that is precisely zero, since the part that was supposed to process payments to the insurers hasn’t even been built yet, and the definition of coverage under these plans is having paid the first month’s premium.

  6. Has anyone out there been able log onto the Covered California web site and successfully “browse” plans? I have tried at least a dozen times since November 1st to see what was offered and have never been able to see details and/or prices for specific plans. In fact, the page load times are now longer than just a couple of weeks ago. I keep hearing from the media how the California exchange is a huge success, but in my experience it’s non-functional. I’m wondering if this is actually a feature of the website, to keep someone such as myself (single, relatively young, not eligible for subsidies) from obtaining any information. Just curious if anybody has had success getting pricing/coverage details in California???

  7. Maybe we should focus more on the damage being caused by ObamaCare’s regulations and not so much on the website failure since the latter will eventually be fixed, but the former won’t be fixed until the Democrats are no longer in the White House.

    1. At this point, I’m not even sure it’s safe to assume the web site will eventually be fixed.

      In general, though, you’re right. The web site is not the problem.

      1. At this point, I’m not even sure it’s safe to assume the web site will eventually be fixed.

        Indeed. It is not uncommon for government systems to limp along for several years, never working well, and then get scrapped completely. Also, the website is a major part of the law since it is supposed to be portal that allows enough people to sign up to prevent the death spiral. Besides, we’ve said about as much as we can about why the regulations are terrible. That isn’t news any more.

    2. ” but the former won’t be fixed.”
      Fixed that for you.

  8. Okay, let me get this straight. About 70% of the system is complete. About 80% of people can successfully submit information. About 70% of that information makes it through unscathed. And about 0% of it is secure.

    On the plus side, maybe most of the unsecure information is wrong?

  9. “The part of the online system that is supposed to perform this comparison, known as ‘reconciliation,’ is not yet built, according to government officials.”

    Wait, what??? So they didn’t put in anything yet to verify that what’s supposed to happen is actually happening? How can anyone build a system and not make this the number one priority? And I love how reconciliation is in quotes, like it’s some obscure concept.

  10. But if I were to sum up who Barack Obama is and how he plans to meet this moment with one word, that word would be ‘responsibility.’ Responsibility to each other, our families, our communities, our country, and our world.

    Valerie Jarrett

    1. Barf, man.

  11. So, when are the 20somethings going to start paying for my health care? I’m not getting any younger.

    1. I’m guessing about 6 months from now. But I can’t tell you when said 20-somethings are going to go “Hang on, if we’re not going to spend the rest of our lives as debt-slaves for things we didn’t even buy, we need to KILL ALL THE OLD PEOPLE!”.

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