Voting

Can Early Voting Fix Long Lines?

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Florida voters waiting in line

President Barack Obama lost out on hundreds of thousands of votes in the 2012 election because of long lines at polling places. 

The president will weigh in on the issue during his State of the Union Address next week, but gave a taste of what is to come in his Inaugural Address late last month:

Our journey is not complete until no citizen is forced to wait for hours to exercise the right to vote.

The longest lines are generally found in cities and urban dwellers tend to vote Democrat, so the issue of long lines for voting has become a partisan flashpoint.

Democrats suggest that the way to eliminate wait times on Election Day is to expand early voting. Florida Gov. Rick Scott, a Republican, took a lot of flak for cutting early voting back from 14 to eight days in his state this cycle. Indeed, Florida voters suffered through the longest lines in the nation during early voting. According to The Huffington Post:

Lines were especially long in Miami-Dade County, where by 7:25 a.m. Saturday two of the county's 20 early voting stations were already suffering 5-hour wait times. Six of the locations listed wait times of six or more hours on Saturday afternoon, hampered perhaps in part by a hefty ballot that was 10 pages for most voters.

But early voting may not solve the problem. Fewer than 25 percent of voters chose to vote early in 2012. A few states—notably Colorado, Florida, North Carolina, and Nevada—saw more than 50 percent turnout before Election Day, but they are the exception.

The focus of reform should be on making Election Day—and early voting—more efficient, not dragging it out.

Nobody should reading complex ballot questions for the first time inside the voting booth. Provide people in line with sample ballots and index cards so they can make their choices ahead of time. True, we send these to people's homes, but few remember to bring them.

And if we want to prevent people from turning away from polls in frustration, we need more transparency about waiting times. Ironically, Florida seems to be leading the charge on this by posting waiting times at polls online.

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  1. The longest lines are generally found in cities and urban dwellers tend to vote Democrat, so the issue of long lines for voting has become a partisan flashpoint.

    Yeah, I would expect this to happen in the places where voters cast multiple votes apiece and have to share the line with imaginary people.

    1. vote early and vote often!

  2. I’m doing my part to reduce long lines by not voting at all.

    1. for every vote you don’t cast, 3 dead Chicagoans vote.

      1. for every vote you do cast, 4 dead Chicagoans vote.

  3. The problem with early voting is that it expands the window for committing fraud, makes ballot security more difficult, etc.

    I expect the majority of voting fraud is committed with absentee ballots these days, but still . . . .

    The Dean Plan for secure voting:

    (1) Paper ballots only.

    (2) No early voting, but election day is a national holiday.

    (3) Absentee ballots must be picked up in person, unless the request is coming from overseas and the ballot is going overseas.

    (4) Nobody gets a ballot (absentee or otherwise) without showing photo ID. To get an overseas ballot, you have to send in a photocopy of your ID.

    1. Racist.

    2. Prove that there exists a measurable problem of “voter fraud” in this country.

      For extra credit cite any instance of voter fraud that wasn’t perpetrated by a Republican.

        1. Christ man now I have to take a shower to get the rabid rightwing godly horseshit off of me.

          Did you see the thing about “hundreds of thousands” of people disenfranchised because of long lines? Is that an acceptable trade-off to prevent literally TENS of cases of voter fraud–all of which were caught anyway?

          I guess there’s always the possibility of hundreds of thousands of undetected cases. Might as well disenfranchise lots of Democrats just to be safe.

          1. Hey, kind of like how there is no evidence to show that banning “assault weapons” would do anything to stop crime or prevent mass shootings but the Left wants to do it anyway.

          2. Right, Tony, I’m sure that the list is complete, because EVERY case of vote fraud has been discovered.

            How many links can I post without the server squirrels thinking I am a spammer?

            http://www.slate.com/blogs/vic…..race_.html

            http://rightwingliberal.wordpr…..s-in-2004/

                1. http://twitchy.com/2012/11/06/…..than-once/

                  http://www.detroitnews.com/art…..oter-rolls

                  I’ve got many more, but I think that makes my point, and I’ve got to get back to work.

                  1. One by one:

                    Missing people doesn’t equal voter fraud. Irrelevant.

                    The Milwaukee thing was attributed mostly to procedural and clerical error, not voter fraud (read the primary source).

                    No fraud here either, just another clerical quirk.

                    Single incident.

                    Irrelevant story not about voter fraud.

                    Internal server error.

                    Twitter anecdotes.

                    Misplaced page.

                    Even if there were a significant voter fraud problem, and there isn’t, disenfranchising people isn’t really the solution, is it? And that’s the only outcome of voter fraud prevention policies out there, and they’re all blatantly partisan in their targeting.

                    I’m all for sophisticated voter verification, provided everyone has free and nonburdensome access to it, but not for the express purpose of encouraging fewer people to vote. And long lines aren’t remotely justifiable on any of these grounds.

                    1. That second link was supposed to be that.

          3. Oh my gawd, yew gais!

            If da peeple cant vote, thell not be abl to vote for the one gai that just like da utter gai!

            /average american

          4. T o n y| 2.6.13 @ 5:59PM |#
            “Christ man now I have to take a shower to get the rabid rightwing godly horseshit off of me.”

            Yes, shithead, most of us feel that way after reading your horseshit.

          5. I’m glad to see you dumbasses have progressed from asserting no Democratic vote fraud takes place to some takes place.

          6. I havent smelled your reek around here in a while T i n y.

            Once again, you make an idiotic claim to support a moronic position, which is immediately shown to be idiotic, but you ignore that and keep rolling on with the same moronic position.

            You are one mendacious motherfucker. And by motherfucker I mean you fuck your mother. Or likely have anyway.

          7. The more people disenfranchised the better. Most people should not be allowed to vote.

            1. But you’re one of the ones who should, I gather?

      1. What’s wrong with assuring the integrity, and thus credibility, of the democratic process?

        Oh, and I forgot:

        (5) All voter databases to be cross-checked and purged of duplications and deceased voters.

      2. I’m with the troll for once. Because it doesn’t matter. There is such a level of “voter stupidity” that “voter fraud” is a moot point.

        Just give the election to the person who promises the most free shit and don’t bother with the vote.

      3. Prove there exists a measurable problem of “mass killings” in this country.

        SOMETHING MUST BE DONE.

        1. So you agree that we shouldn’t restrict voting access.

          1. Tony w/spaces, I for one am glad to see that you are completely immune to irony.

            When Umbrella Corp. unleashes the I-Virus, you’ll be safe.

      4. Prove that there exists a measurable problem of “voter fraud” in this country.

        I suppose “walking around money” doesn’t count as voter fraud?

        http://www.slate.com/articles/…..money.html

      5. Nice. Oppose any effort that would allow collecting such proof, and then say that there isn’t any proof.

    3. (3) Absentee ballots must be picked up in person, unless the request is coming from overseas and the ballot is going overseas.

      I’m trying to think of how this would work, and I can’t. The whole point of an absentee ballot is for when you aren’t in the area to be able to pick one up or vote in person. Might as well just not allow absentee voting except for those who are oversees.

    4. 2) Constitutional Amendment to change the voting day to the Saturday after the first Monday in November.

  4. How about next election we tell everyone that

    Minor Party voters vote on Tuesday

    Major Party voters vote on Wednesday.

    1. I tell my liberal friends that every election.

    2. How about we put down this rotting, zombified corpse we call the American experiment out of its fucking misery, and quit pretending that elections are anything more than just delaying the inevitable?

      1. How about we put down this rotting, zombified corpse we call the American experiment out of its fucking misery, and quit pretending that elections are anything more than just delaying hastening the inevitable?

        Fixed it for you.

        1. Elections provide the facade of legitimacy, allow the illusion of rule of law, and give the impression of choice; that’s it.

          So yes, they do delay what is inevitable.

  5. I tried to vote twice this year, and gave up because of a 3+ block line outdoors with subfreezing temperatures.

    Guys, it’s my fault that Obama won. I was that one vote in MA that kept Johnson from winning it all.

  6. Can Early Voting Fix Long Lines?

    No but long lines can fix voting.

  7. Nobody should reading complex ballot questions for the first time inside the voting booth.

    By golly, you’re right! The booth itself should read the questions aloud to the voter. We *have* the technology.

  8. early voting will cause long lines at the doctor’s office

  9. I, for one, am in favor of it being difficult to vote and recommend a approach that includes an obstacle course.

    1. And a basic citizenship quiz.

      1. And a basic logic quiz.

        1. And a Star Trek trivia contest.

        2. And a swimsuit competition.

    2. Beer pong. Or Quarters. Or Asshole.

  10. Can Early Droning Fix Long Lines?

    1. Wrong thread…

      1. Works for me.

  11. Don’t like long lines of voters? Easy fix, make voting harder. Maybe a long quiz before every election to root out uninformed voters would help.

    1. A state that required a bare minimum of intelligence and education ? e.g., step into the polling booth and find that the computer has generated a new quadratic equation just for you. Solve it, the computer unlocks the voting machine, you vote. But get a wrong answer and the voting machine fails to unlock, a loud bell sounds, a red light goes on over the booth ? and you slink out, face red, you having just proved yourself too stupid and/or ignorant to take part in the decisions of grownups. Better luck next election! No lower age limit in this system ? smart 12-yr-old girls vote every election while some of their mothers ? and fathers ? decline to be humiliated twice.

      There are endless variations on this one. Here are two: Improving the Breed ? No red light, no bell?but the booth opens automatically ? empty. Revenue ? You don’t risk your life, just some gelt. It costs you 1/4 oz. troy of gold in local currency to enter the booth. Solve your quadratic and vote, and you get your money back. Flunk ? and the state keeps it. With this one I guarantee that no one would vote who was not interested and would be most unlikely to vote if unsure of his ability to get that hundred bucks back.

      1. a bare minimum of intelligence and education ? … a new quadratic equation just for you.

        Of course, in order to *run* for office one would have to solve a quartic equation.

  12. Our journey is not complete until no citizen is forced to wait for hours to exercise the right to vote.

    Let me be clear: no one is forcing these people to attempt to oppress their neighbors.

  13. My vote is worthless in CA, but they do one thing right: “Absentee” ballots are available on request.
    Sit at your desk, read the proposed legislation at your leisure, mark the ballot and mail it in.

  14. This is why libertarians can’t be trusted. They say they favor liberty, but in reality they just have a laundry list of policy demands they want everyone to live by, and they don’t really care for the idea of getting it accomplished via democracy.

    1. T o n y| 2.6.13 @ 5:56PM |#
      “This is why libertarians can’t be trusted”

      Yeah, shithead, we can certainly trust the liar in chief:
      “White House declines to explain drone policy, says Obama serious about protecting Americans”
      http://www.washingtonpost.com/…..story.html

    2. Oh, and:
      T o n y| 2.6.13 @ 5:56PM |#
      …”they don’t really care for the idea of getting it accomplished via democracy.”

      You are right about that shithead. It’s been pointed out to you often enough that we don’t live in a democracy, but you’re stupid enough to keep claiming we do.

    3. they just have a laundry list of policy demands they want everyone to live by,

      Known as the Constitution of the United States.

      they don’t really care for the idea of getting it accomplished via democracy.

      1. Dammit.

        Doesn’t your appeal to democracy presume a secure, credible, and legitimate voting process?

      2. The last 200 years were not the country living in sin. The constitution has remained legitimate, despite not being remotely a libertarian document with libertarian outcomes.

        All I want is for one libertarian to stand up for the obvious pro-freedom position on one fucking issue that happens to benefit Democrats electorally as a side effect. Just an iota of evidence of this “principle” you base your self-proclaimed moral superiority on.

        Obvious partisan maneuvers to limit the franchise of people who don’t tend to vote for a particular party is not the pro-freedom side of this debate.

        1. I think voting is a fundamental right given to us by nature/God, not government. I think voting is a fundamental right and should be protected. I think photo IDs secure the integrity of the ballot. I think government photo IDs are equivalent to a voting tax and restrict ballot access. My conclusion is that we should require IDs, but allow for IDs procured from sources other than government.

          I think this is a compromise. I agree voting is a fundamental freedom, but because it’s a freedom, its integrity should be protected. This protection cannot come at the cost of limiting access to the freedom itself.

          1. Ghetto Slovak Goatherder| 2.6.13 @ 9:14PM |#
            “I think voting is a fundamental right given to us by nature/God, not government”

            OK, so you can vote for, what, the American Idol candidates?
            Vote all you please, just don’t allow the vote to affect my freedoms or wallet.

            1. I think we have a right to pick our representatives. Whether or not their powers should be more limited so they can’t have as big an influence on everyone is another discussion. Although I agree.

              1. Ghetto Slovak Goatherder| 2.6.13 @ 9:28PM |#
                “I think we have a right to pick our representatives. Whether or not their powers should be more limited so they can’t have as big an influence on everyone is another discussion. Although I agree.”

                I’m afraid the second needs to be determined before I’d agree with with first.
                Democracy is an imperfect method of achieving some freedoms, but not without limiting it beforehand.

                1. Assuming our current limitations on government, would you rather get to pick our representatives or not?

          2. My conclusion is that we should require IDs, but allow for IDs procured from sources other than government.

            Uhhh, who gets to decide if they pass muster?

            1. Donno. But government doesn’t endow us with our right to vote, therefore you have to be able to procure IDs from some source other than government. But I don’t think it’s illegitimate for government to protect voting.

        2. Oh my God. You mean like the libertarians advocating for open borders Tony? OR how about libertarians advocating the end to the drug war and the consequent end to disenfranchising thousands of inner city minorities who vote overwhelmingly democrat?

          That’s just off the top of my head.

          It’s amazing how stupid you are, Tony. You seem to careen through lost argument to lost argument, never learning; making mistake after mistake.

          Life just kind of happens to you, doesn’t it?

          1. I didn’t think most libertarians realized what criminal justice reform would do to elections. Now you’ve done it.

        3. T o n y| 2.6.13 @ 8:57PM |#
          …”All I want is for one libertarian to stand up for the obvious pro-freedom position on one fucking issue that happens to benefit Democrats electorally as a side effect.”…

          Shorter shithead:
          ‘All I want is for someone who claims to be libertarian to agree with me!’
          Sorry, shithead. No takers. The reasons have been explained to you in terms that, if not monosyllabic, were at least understandable to those with an 8th-grade PS education.
          The fact that you still do not understand says quite a bit about your metal capabilities, shithead.

    4. and they don’t really care for the idea of getting it accomplished via democracy.

      Yes and I proudly and openly own that because democracy is a means to an end, not an end itself. It’s results aren’t holy and incontrovertible which is the nonsense the Left spouts (assuming they get the result they want, if not then evil corporations and false consciousness is to blame).

    5. This is why libertarians can’t be trusted.

      You are the same guy who wants government forced birth control. Most people call that eugenics.

      Your laundry list is not only more dirty but in fact drenched in blood.

      1. Government forced birth control?

        Can I have a few minutes to think it over?

        1. When did you start thinking, sockpuppet?

    6. Yeah, I know “Do what you want” is such an onerous policy to have to live by.

      1. “Except vote!”

        1. Vote all you want, but don’t think it necessarily means anything to me.

    7. You know, when libertarians talk about basic intelligence tests for voting they’re half joking. Nobody seriously thinks Democrats would ever let anything get in their way of finding the most ignorant knuckleheads and ensuring they stay as empty-headed as possible as long as it takes for them to pull the lever.

      1. As opposed to the erudite sophisticates of the Republican base.

        1. T o n y| 2.6.13 @ 8:58PM |#
          “As opposed to the erudite sophisticates of the Republican base.”

          Yes. Most of them don’t presume unicorns deliver free stuff, shithead.

          1. Except the free stuff known as peace and prosperity from the unicorn known as the laissez-faire market.

  15. Why not just open more polling places so they each have to serve fewer people? It’s not like politicians are usually averse to just throwing money at a problem, and this time it could actually work. Is there really no way to extract graft from a polling place?

  16. I don’t know why everyone doesn’t vote absentee. Instead of standing around in line, I finished voting in the time it took to research (somewhat) the ballot and mark it in. Also, I was totally drunk – take that, bar closers!

    1. Or what Sevo said upthread, only with BOOZE!

  17. OT: This is why no compromises can be made and everything is but the camel putting its nose under the tent. See Maryland Senate Bill 281, Page 13, Line 12
    (2) “Handgun” includes signal, starter, and blank pistols.

    I own a blank pistol for training my dog. The damn things have been made continuously since1871, so I believe it is safe to say that many a swim and running coaches own one too. What appears to be a barrel is a solid steel rod. Because the solid steel rod blocks the opening of the cylinder, a .22 short cartridge will not chamber in one of these blank pistols. The Federal Bureau of Alcohol, Firearms and Tobacco (ATF) consider this blank pistol to be a non-firearm.

    If MD SB281 passes ? and it will as MD is a single party state with a term limited governor that fancies himself as a presidential contender ? my blank pistol will be seen in the eyes of the law the same as a Smith & Wesson Model 29 (Dirty Harry’s .44 Magnum). I will have to be licensed, pass a safety course, have a background check, have my blank pistol registered and become a felon if I fail to do any of these things.

    1. Come one Tony and Shreek, explain to me why SB281 is a “common Sense” approach to safety for the sake of hte chilrenz.

      1. that’;s fricking ridiculous. it fires no projectile, in fact has a solid steel rod for a “barrel”. how is that a firearm under any reasonable definition?

        contrast with , for example, a flare gun (what i arrested the convicted armed robber/felon for in relation to VUFA- felon in possession of a firearm), which fires a projectile, to wit – a flare, by means of an explosive.

        has there been no debate in the MD house/senate about this stupidity?

        1. Its a firearm using the same sort of logic that sees people being arrested for DUI when on private property, riding a bike, asleep, or even an electric scooter *inside* Walmart.

          http://www.duiblog.com/

          1. not at all. DUI in many states can occur on a ‘way’ vs. a public way, and for good reason.

            consider, for example, large apartment complexes with networks of private roads. should residents of same not be offered the protection of DUI enforcement in their private (shared) roads?

            i would agree that solely one user private property DUI’s should not be allowed under the law (iow dui in your own driveway type things).

            just because a roadway is private (again, there are many apartment complexes and other private road networks that span MILES), doesn’t give people safety from DUI’ers trolling their roads.

            i had a friend arrested for FELONY DUI on a bicycle when we were in college. he was under the influence and had his girlfriend on the handlebars. he crashed and she suffered some NASTY facial/head injuries- boom FELONY dui.

            he got it pled down to a misdemeanor, fortunately, so did not lose firearms rights, etc. which is a good thing.

            there but for the grace of god man, because i can guarantee i was DUI on a bicycle on more than one occasion in college. i mostly rode a skatebooard though (UCSB)

            1. i’ve had a lot of friends victimized by DUI, including a bunch of coworkers.

              here’s one of my academy classmates who paid the ultimate price

              http://www.odmp.org/officer/15…..e-williams

              interesting guy. worked intel in the military prior to serving in law enforcement. spoke fluent greek and russian.

        2. Certain travel gurus advise flying with a starter pistol in your luggage because they are treated the same as actual firearms for inspection and security purposes.

        3. Dunphy,

          You probably won’t see this response, but you are right this is ridiculous.

          There will be debate, but Maryland is such a single party state, that I fear this bill will pass.

          Our only hope is they put some of the more stupid stuff in just so they can throw them out and claim that they’ve compromised.

      2. Fuck you asshole. I am 100% ANY gun regulations – even registration.

        Remember, I support Fast and Furious. More guns and more Free Trade.

        1. Palin’s Buttplug| 2.6.13 @ 8:31PM |#
          “Fuck you asshole. I am 100% ANY gun regulations – even registration.
          Remember, I support Fast and Furious. More guns and more Free Trade.”

          Yeah, dipshit, it would take an ignoramus like you to somehow equate the two.

          1. That is right, you GOP dipshit. I don’t to block free trade – guns, pussy, or drugs.

            1. But you do support regulations which do block the free trade of firearms ergo you are opposed to free trade.

              1. What? Link?

                No regs on guns for me!

                I score 94% on the LP Purity Test – much higher than any Republican.

                1. Palin’s Buttplug | 2.6.13 @ 8:31PM | #

                  Fuck you asshole. I am 100% ANY gun regulations – even registration.

                  Fuck off, shrieky-boy

                2. I score 94% on the LP Purity Test – much higher than any Republican.

                  That may very well be. But obviously, you only scored 50 on the IQ test.

        2. Why do you hate Mexicans, shriek?

          1. If they want to shoot each other up – fine. I’ll sell them the guns to do it.

            1. No you won’t, shrieky-boy. The State Department will sell them the guns via DCS, and you’ll put on your dunce cap and make excuses for big daddy government when they do.

  18. I waited 3 hours in line to vote for Bandnarik in 2004 (precinct went 3-1 for Kerry.) My wife was at the polling place when they opened and the line was 50-60 yards long. I drove by when the polls closed and the line still was about a city block long. When the board of elections published the results, I computed the average time per voter to be no less than 6 minutes. I went into the booth prepared, and it took me about 90 seconds.

    It was very clear to me that a bunch of the voters were reading the ballot issues for the first time and it pissed me off that none of the local commentary on the long lines mentioned this. I suppose it’s possible that the Rs in the precinct conspired to stall and keep the lines long, but I doubt it. In light of this all of the D’s whining about the long lines really left me cold.

    1. I have no experiences with these long line stories. This past years line was the longest I’ve ever stood in and it had 3 people in it.

      1. My polling place never seems to have a line. It’s right inside my coffeeshop and doesn’t seem to add any more traffic than they normally have there, which did surprise me at first (I was going to the coffeeshop before it became a polling place, so when I saw it was one I thought election day would be a nightmare there, but it wasn’t). But other places I’ve driven by have been a total shitshow. Last year I saw a line blocks long for a library-based polling place a couple miles south of me in a more yuppie part of the north side. And that was early voting! Couldn’t believe people were waiting for that shit.

        As far as reading ballot issues for the first time in the polling booth, I’m sure that does happen, but from what I did see in the coffeeshop it looked like a major part of the problem was people who were too retarded to know how to use a pen. I shit you not. It was bizarre. Of course the workers weren’t exactly fast-moving either.

  19. The best solution for long lines at the polls is to hand out a pamphlet clearly with photos of both major party candidates stating their positions on a slate of issues. Once people see that the only difference between them is the color of their neckties, they will realize what a sham American democracy is and go home without voting.

  20. my state (WA) recently switched to voting by mail, exclusively. i’m not sure how prone/notprone to fraud it is (iow if that is a legitimate concern), but it certainly is convenient and eliminates lines.

    you gotta love a state that has convenient mail voting to go along with no income tax, privacy respecting state constitution, no permit required open carry of firearms, etc.

      1. interesting the way reasonoids all of a sudden trust the DOJ in their subjective assessments because it’s against cops. usually, they are hypercritical of DOJ opinion of various threats (terrorism, etc.)

        noted a double standard.

        fwiw, studies have shown SPD uses less force per call/per capita (significantly less) than other similar sized metro agencies. i have posted stats to that effect.

        SPD is imo a mediocre police dept., but the federal power grab is ridiculous

    1. It’s a good system, at least from my perspective.

    2. “my state (WA) …you gotta love a state that has…”

      Legal recreational pot! We win!

  21. I usually early vote simply because you can do it on a Saturday and I hate making stops on my way to and from work during the week. I think if they just moved the actual General Election day to a Staurday turnout would improve.

    1. Agree moving to Sat would make life a lot simpler.

      I wonder why the framers picked Tuesday in the first place? Oh, right – rich, white, slaveholders – not a problem for them.

      /snarkarrific

    2. Yeah, but that would require Federal employees to work on a Saturday. You clearly don’t understand for whose benefit election laws are drafted.

  22. Our journey is not complete until no citizen is forced to wait for hours to exercise the right to vote.

    Your concerns and priorities are very, very different from mine, Mr. President.

    Requiring a couple hours to vote —— SOMALIA!!1!!1

  23. Why not let people vote from their couches? If people have to expend any effort to vote, they might try to inform themselves on the issues first in order to justify the trip. Ain’t nobody got time for that.

  24. Just go back to the way it used to be, with everyone waiting in line getting handed a pre-filled ballot that allows them to vote straight Democrat.

  25. Half the reason for the long lines is that the stupid, low information liberal voters living in the typical American shitty can barely even fucking read, so they need at least two people to tell them which buttons to push and it takes them three times as long to vote as it does a normal person.

    1. Don’t judge city life until you’ve been to a city.

      1. T o n y| 2.6.13 @ 8:59PM |#
        “Don’t judge city life until you’ve been to a city.”

        And it’s quite clear that Mike M. posted absolutely nothing about “city life”, isn’t it, shithead?
        Don’t judge what those with brains do until you find some, shithead.

  26. I now vote by mail, but when I voted in the booth, I’d have my sample ballot completed beforehand. I’m practically blind so I was still kind of slow at it. Why it takes a non-handicapped person more than a couple minutes to fill out the ballot I don’t know.

    1. Jesus H. Christ| 2.6.13 @ 8:34PM |#
      “I now vote by mail, but when I voted in the booth, I’d have my sample ballot completed beforehand”

      Ditto.
      I think the solution is a play clock. You didn’t mark up the sample ballot first? Are you that bozo who gets to the toll plaza and then says ‘Oh, I have to pay a toll?’. The asshole who gets to the ATM and *then* starts filling out the deposit slip?
      Well, 25 seconds. After that the plate beneath your feet flips you out in the street so people of some intelligence don’t have to wait for you.

  27. O/T

    I’ve been Torified, bitchez

  28. Speaking of being Torified, I believe David Chaum developed a way of voting using PGP digital signatures.

    Somewhere in here, IIRC:

    http://www.chaum.com/articles/…..cation.htm

  29. How about online voting?

    1. It’s as fair as MLB All Star voting.

  30. This whole discussion is misplaced. Leave voting alone. However, with each election at every level, add ostracism. In national elections, we all get to vote to ostracize a national politician. For state, a state politician, for local, a local politician. No matter what the election is for, there’s a blank line for ostracism.

    The nature of the ostracism could be the traditional ten-year exile, but I think just ten years out of public office would suffice.

      1. I prefer my non-violent solution.

        1. Violence in response to the initiation of force, which is all that government does, is justified.

          On the contrary; my speculation assumed that the “victim” is a government employee, presumably one who is not merely taking a paycheck of stolen tax dollars, but also is guilty of extra violations of rights beyond this. (Government agents responsible for the Ruby Ridge incident and Waco come to mind.) In receiving such money and in his various acts, he violates the “Non-aggression Principle” (NAP) and thus, presumably, any acts against him are not the initiation of force under libertarian principles.

          The organization set up to manage such a system could, presumably, make up a list of people who had seriously violated the NAP, but who would not see justice in our courts due to the fact that their actions were done at the behest of the government.

        2. BTW. the author of that, Jim Bell, was released from prison this past March after 10 years for “tax evasion” and “harassing federal employees”. The federal employees were providing surveillance of his actions, of course.

          Bell was one of the original Cypherpunks. They are a big part of reason why the internet is still relatively “free”. I believe the EFF was an offshoot of the Cypherpunks.

  31. Australia and Mexico have compulsory voting. They were discussing bringing it in to Canada.

    1. Yeah, Canada is the test-vehicle for all sorts of stupidity.

    2. I might be able to accept that if there was a “None of the above” choice on the ballot.

      Might.

      Probably not. But NOTA is still a good idea.

      … Hobbit

  32. Natalie Zea is back on “Justified”. She’s on two shows at once, yet still better on “Justified”.

  33. OT: Rent-seeker vs rent-seeker:
    SF hopes to mandate $X00K upgrade of buildings; ‘renters community’ gripes since they might have to pay for being safe!
    http://www.sfgate.com/bayarea/…..254446.php
    Hard to find a hero here.

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