Russia

Kremlin's Internet Surveillance Program Goes Live

Claims to protect against pedophiles, but of course can be used to block political opponents

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On the surface, it's all about protecting Russian kids from internet pedophiles. In reality, the Kremlin's new "Single Register" of banned websites, which goes into effect today, will wind up blocking all kinds of online political speech. And, thanks to the spread of new internet-monitoring technologies, the Register could well become a tool for spying on millions of Russians.

Signed into law by Vladimir Putin on July 28, the internet-filtering measure contains a single, innocuous-sounding paragraph that allows those compiling the Register to draw on court decisions relating to the banning of websites. The problem is, the courts have ruled to block more than child pornographers' sites. The judges have also agreed to online bans on political extremists and opponents of the Putin regime.