Marijuana

A New High: 50 Percent of Americans Support Legalizing Marijuana

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Don't worry about American youth, at least when it comes to the reefer. For the first time ever, 50 percent of Americans favor legalization of marijuana; and someone has been teaching the kids to be more sensible than the seniors.

Here's some demographics breakdown from Gallup:

Support for legalizing marijuana is directly and inversely proportional to age, ranging from 62% approval among those 18 to 29 down to 31% among those 65 and older. Liberals are twice as likely as conservatives to favor legalizing marijuana. And Democrats and independents are more likely to be in favor than are Republicans.

More men than women support legalizing the drug. Those in the West and Midwest are more likely to favor it than those in the South.

Gallup notes that the high point of opposition to legalization was 84 percent in 1969 (when Gallup first asked the question.) Only 12 percent of folks were hippies or sensible back then, it seems. However, the numbers have been crawling up towards support for legalization ever since.

Roll Call also points out something Reason has noticed, too—whenever the Obama administration asks the public what they want, legalization of marijuana is invariably a loud answer. Then comes the unfunny stoner jokes or just old-fashioned ignoring the issue.

Roll Call:

Marijuana legalization has been the top issue on the White House's new "We the People" petition site since it launched last month as a way for citizens to lobby for issues that matter most to them.

The marijuana petition already has more than 55,000 signatures — 20,000 more than any other issue on the site and much more than the 25,000-signature threshold administrators set to warrant an official response. The White House has not yet responded to the marijuana petition.

And so it has been each time the Obama administration engaged voters online: Marijuana legalization was among the most popular questions raised on Twitter, YouTube and Change.gov, the president's transition site.

The official response from Obama to this kind of cultural shift? Obviously to crack down on the most vulnerable users of this drug, violating state law and the president's previous promises ( the Obama disappointment has been extensively reported on by Jacob Sullum, particularly in Reason's October cover story) in the process.

Reason on marijuana.

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85 responses to “A New High: 50 Percent of Americans Support Legalizing Marijuana

  1. I fear that as long as there’s money to be made and power to be grabbed in keeping it illegal, it’ll be illegal, regardless of whether a majority favor legalization.

    1. This is correct. Millions dependent on the international police/court/prison/therapy industry sprung from prohibitionism will fight it to their last breath.

      Do not even get me started on the billions reaped every year from forfeiture abuses…

    2. those are impediments, not impassable, immovable objects. there are plenty o’ other things that were legalized even though there was money to be made and power to be grabbed by keeping them illegal.

      it just makes it harder

      heck, think of home brewing, for example.

      1. In the end, I think it’ll be insurmountable. Sure, 50 percent may favor legaliztion, but I’d bet that most of that 50 percent are people who really don’t care very much about the issue to begin with. As long as the number of people who are truly passionate about it is small, their voices will be drowned out by those entities that Federal Dog listed.

        1. i strongly disagree. i may be an optimist, but maybe i’m just deluded.

          either way, this naysaying reminds me of the “obama will never get elected. he’s black. this is a racist country” type arguments. heck, if you told people DADT would get overturned due to a lawsuit by an organization of REPUBLICANS would you believe it?

          i think medical mj will make huge inroads because people will see their friends/neighbors etc. (especially those of an older generation who thinks pot is an evil drug) using it without ill effect and realize how (relatively) benign it is.

          the status quo though is such that the average joe can smoke mj and know with near complete certainty that the worst thing he risks is maybe a small fine IF he is caught and IF the cops and or prosecutors even bother to make a case.

          NORML propaganda aside, the average MJ smoker (not dealer or person growing mass quantities) really does have statistically very little to fear from law enforcement, thus that is also not a huge incentive to legalize it.

          those who want it can get it EASILY and smoke it w/o much risk whatsoever.

          at least in many very highly populated areas, and probably the vast majority of the US

          1. i may be an optimist, but maybe i’m just deluded.

            Being wrong doesn’t necessarily mean you’re deluded 😉

            i think medical mj will make huge inroads because people will see their friends/neighbors etc. (especially those of an older generation who thinks pot is an evil drug) using it without ill effect and realize how (relatively) benign it is.

            You mean the same way they’ve been seeing it used illicitly for decades now, with little or no ill effect, and realizing how benign it actually is?

            Sure, I think legalizing it for medicinal purposes would lend some legitimacy to it, but I still have a hard time seeing it go mainstream, again because there are too many people out there with a vested interest in fighting a “war” against it.

            But hey, you may be right. I do believe that if larger numbers of guys in law enforcement took your attitude, it probably would become legal.

            1. except so many of these people DON’T see it used illicitly now like they would see or at least know it was licitly used by their (especially the elderly) friends and neighbors via medical mj laws.

              there are literally scores of millions of people who don’t live amongst “hipsters” and people who smoke pot, etc.

              medical MJ will expose them to it when they go over to their neighbor glenda’s house, for some tea or whatever and glenda is there smoking her medical mj and a conversation starts

              your average paleo-con etc., for example

              i really don’t think you account for how many people there are out there who have literally never even seen a joint.

              hey, i went to college in socal. every fucking dorm room had a bong and a surfboard , but i know that is not the norm.

              pot is a LOT more hidden in the suburbs etc. than it would be when medical mj becomes more common in these communities etc.

              i’m talking neighborhoods where CPAP machines, depends ™, and wilford brimley sponsored diabetes supplies are extant

              i have a friend whose dad started smoking medical mj due to cancer. he knew i was a cop and we were talking about it and he admitted he had NEVER EVEN SEEN A “marijuana cigarette” and the guy was in his 60’s

              there are a LOT of minds to change

            2. i think you are suffering from pauline kael syndrome.

              “You mean the same way they’ve been seeing it used illicitly for decades now, with little or no ill effect, and realizing how benign it actually is?”

              there are scores of millions of people who have NEVER seen a marijuana cigarette (to use the terminology i heard from a recent medical mj patient, in his 60’s who had NEVER SEEN ONE IN HIS LIFE), but have seen CPAP machines, insulin pens, depends, etc.

              hey, where i went to college, every fucking apartment had a bong and a surfboard, but that doesn’t mean that there aren’t scores of millions of people who have never been within a statute mile of a surfboard

              there are scores of millions of these minds to be changed when they go over to neighbor martha’s house for some neighborly sugar borrowing and martha is smoking a “marijuana cigarette” and they start talking…

              “y’know, i never thought i would ever be smoking marijeewaanna, but now that my dr. prescribed it and i have, i realize it’s not what i thought it was”

              etc.

              there will be MILLIONS of such stories in the naked city (and more likely the suburbs) than i think you fathom imnsho

      2. I am somewhat optimistic about this as well. It is becoming more and more normal and attitudes are changing in different ways than they have in the past, I think.
        The main problem I see is that most people just see prohibition as the natural default position for recreational drugs that aren’t alcohol. They need a positive argument for why it is not so bad to justify legalization. I think people will get there in my lifetime, but for the same reason, I don’t have much hope for ending prohibition of hard drugs.

  2. Liberals are twice as likely as conservatives to favor legalizing marijuana. And Democrats and independents are more likely to be in favor than are Republicans.

    So I imagine that these demographics are going to angrily vote Obama out of office for repeatedly breaking his promise not to raid medical marijuana dispensaries.

    1. Nixon went to China, maybe Cain or Romney can inhale.

    2. The thing that’s even sillier about Obama’s tactics is that it’s a good wedge issue for Democrats, in that Independents and Democrats have virtually the same views. So it could be a good thing to push.

      Perhaps people opposing it feel very strongly about it.

      1. An old LP saying: “Pot smokers are great on the drug issue but for one thing, they show up to vote on Thursday.”

    3. Similar thought, but I was watching Morning Joe this morning and Scarborough was complaining that liberals are giving BO a total pass on doubling-down on Bush-Cheney foreign policy and totally ignoring the rule of law. Diehard blowhard Dr. Jeffrey Sachs then decried that the pentagon’s foreign policy was not working, completely making Joe’s point. It couldn’t possibly be the commander in chief’s fault. Well it could, but not if the commander in chief is named Barack Obama.

    4. “So I imagine that these demographics are going to angrily vote Obama out of office for repeatedly breaking his promise not to raid medical marijuana dispensaries.” A man can dream, I guess.

  3. It’s probably be more politically possible to limit the franchise to men in their thirties who live west of Chicago than to get weed legalized.

    Then you could totally get weed legalized.

  4. Looking at trends, legalization at the Federal level is inevitable.

    So what’s the over/under? 10 years? 20?

    I’ll wager 15 years until Federal decriminalization of mj. Then another 10-20 until full blow legalization.

    1. Given a push for drug-testing all administration- and congress-creatures and their staffs — and who could possibly be against *that*? — I wager decriminalization will happen much more quickly.

  5. And we’ve got High Hopes.
    We’ve got High Hopes.
    We’ve got high apple pie in the sky hopes.

  6. The problem is that stoners can’t drag their sorry butts to the voting booth on election day.

    1. i think pot legalization will be a lot closer to reality when people don’t associate the average mj user/advocate as a “stoner” …

      we don’t call the average drinker a “drunk”, but the term stoner has similar negative implications.

      i realize you were being sarcastic, but i like to remember that many marijuana legalization advocates don’t even smoke mj AT ALL, and most people that smoke it are not stoners, in the typical sense

      1. This is a good point. I don’t smoke, and I won’t if it ever gets legalized. I just think the war on drugs is the worst thing that has happened in this country in my life time.

      2. we don’t call the average drinker a “drunk”, but the term stoner has similar negative implications.

        That’s because, proportionally, there are more casual drinkers than drunks, where as a lot of the people who would likely have been casual marijuana users were scared away by anti-drug laws, leaving a larger ratio of stoners to casual users.

        1. that MAY be true, otoh considering that pot is NOT physically addictive, it may not be.

          regardless, that’s a good point.

          at least from my experience (granted, again… MY experience) in college, i knew people who chose not to smoke pot for any # of reasons, and chose to smoke it for the same… but “i’m afraid of getting in legal trouble” wasn’t really one of them.

          granted, this was socal in the 80’s. i don’t recall hearing of a single kid on my campus ever getting busted for pot. considering that nearly every apartment had a bong prominently displayed, that’s pretty amazing.

          but again, i’m aware there are places where it’s taken more seriously.

          i personally chose not to smoke cause i just thought it was fucking lame. some of the other guys in my band smoked, but only one was even remotely “stoner” esque.

          i had water polo/swimmer roommates and those guys were SERIOUS wake and bakers.

          granted, if i had two hours of endless laps to look forward to (how mind numbingly boring can you get), maybe i would have waked and baked too.

          1. You were in a band? Please don’t tell me you did Pink Floyd covers. I can only handle so much irony.

            1. no. i realize the anti-establishment irony of a cop playing floyd covers, but i cut my teeth on punk and stuff like that. as much as a love floyd, i was way more into stuff that was a RESPONSE to floyd – iow the conception of overproduced pretentious rock.

              i was more a ramones, black flag, johnny cochrane, the cure, etc. type of guy in regards to the songs we played

              we also did a lot of frat parties, and thus did the frat standards.

              i did a lot of production, as well as playing.

              i recently bought a kick-ass modeler, and just started doing some recording etc. again. beats my old 4 track.

              i can send sound files to my bassist (from college) and he adds bass, his son adds drums, etc. long distance song production

              technology rools

              1. we also did a lot of frat parties, and thus did the frat standards

                Like “Do You Love Me?” and “Shout”?
                Toga, Toga…

              2. ramones, black flag, johnny cochrane,

                If the glove don’t fit, uh … jump in the slam pit! Or did you mean Johnny Thunders?

                1. lol. i meant EDDIE COCHRANE.

                  i like the rock-a-billy stuff.

                  played a tele and an ibanez hollowbody.

                  we did (for example)…

                  summertime blues, and “somethin’ else”

                  great tunes.

                  did X too. one of my all time favorite bands.

                  1. Did you also play any punkabilly e.g. The Cramps?

                    1. didn’t do any cramps, but i liked them. their music was prominently featured in one of my all time favorite underground surf movies “runman”

                      not a HUGE cramps fan, but i liked them

  7. Don’t worry stoners, Barry O will jump on the legalize bandwagon as soon as he can find a way to make it line his corrupt pockets … its just the Chicago way

  8. Please! Hurry & click & sign petition http://wh.gov/gP1 at White House to END MARIJUANA PROHIBITION,
    deadline Oct. 22

    1. Why do we need a constitutional amendment to legalize pot? THEY are the ones who need the amendment.

      18th Amendment Bitches!

  9. When I think of marijuana, I remember Aldous Huxley’s “Brave New World” and the use of soma. Keep the masses drugged so they are more agreeable.

  10. Ugh, that last paragraph is a doozy. Three misspellings by an Associate Editor?

    “The offical [sic] response from Obama to this kind of cultural shift? Obviously to crack down on the most vulnernable [sic] users of this drug, violating state law and the president’s previous promises (the Obama disapointement [sic] …”

    Come on, Reason — that’s embarrassing!

    1. Fucking spell check, etc.

      Although I kind of like disapointement. Has kind of an 18th century feel to it.

    2. Yes, yes it is embarrassing.

      I blame Robitussin. Except you people already know that’s not really it.

      1. Lincoln Osiris: What do you mean, “you people”?

        Alpa Chino: What do you mean, “you people”?

  11. More men than women support legalizing the drug.

    Fucking soccer moms.

    1. this point is actually very true. women with kids are (not so oddly) the strongest supporters of what we generally think of us “nanny” type laws.

      the sexist (lol) terminology actually has a lot of validity.

      you could get all pseudointellectualhorsesass(tm) about the protective/nurturingmommyinstinct(tm), but it’s just a reality, as polls show.

      granted, dads with teenage daughters can get pretty overprotective, but it’s usually more of a “if you come near my daughter, i’ll fucking kill you” type attitude than a “let’s pass a law to…” type attitude that women are more likely to support in regards to nannyism

      let’s remember the temperance movement was a woman’s movement, primarily.

      1. granted, dads with teenage daughters can get pretty overprotective, but it’s usually more of a “if you come near my daughter, i’ll fucking kill you” type attitude than a “let’s pass a law to…” type attitude that women are more likely to support in regards to nannyism

        This is a good point. I think that the decline of two parent marriages (of which I blame feminism) is part to blame. Having a man in the house could ameliorate some of that pathetic response soccer moms seem to have to have their society completely risk free. Dad’s, and I realize this is sterotypical, are risk takers. “Hell yeah you can shoot my gun, let’s go.”

        1. i refer to this in patrol as “single mom” syndrome. a substantial # of “my kid is out of control and i need help” calls come from single moms

          essentially, they use the state (cops) as surrogate dads, or try to.

          i tell them “you can physically discipline your kid. *i* can’t”

          i’ve seen single moms call police because their kid refused to go to school.

          seriously.

          i’ve had a few heart to heart man to man with some of these kids, but i can’t be their dads, and a boy growing up w/o a father is far more likely to engage in any # of crime/sociopathologies. it’s a sad readlity.

          1. That’s the irony, a boy growing up without a father is much more likely to commit crime, and single moms want more and more laws to protect their children from that crime.

          2. essentially, they use the state (cops) as surrogate dads, or try to.

            i tell them “you can physically discipline your kid. *i* can’t”

            I was talking to a small-town cop the other week, and he told me it’s not uncommon for him to collar a kid for some minor crime, take the kid home, and have the mom start screaming at the kid and then start whomping on him right in front of the cops. He seemed like he was unsure whether he should at least be relieved they took some interest in their kids’ behavior…

            1. well, that’s infinitely better than the “not my precious child” type of parent who when you bring the kid home is pissed off at the cops for daring to accuse their precious innocent child of anything and how dare we and i want your badge #

              “ma’am, not only did i witness your son spray painting the building, but so did three other witnesses”

              “no way. you are all lying. my son would never do that. i am going to sue you for falsely arresting him and them for perjury and…”

              that kind of shit

    2. Whether you think fucking soccer moms will help end the drug war, I don’t know-depends how talented you are but I am sure I know more women who believe in using pot for medicinal purposes. Men use is more to chill

      1. was that English?

        1. It was asphinctersayswhat.

      2. rather dipping into his own supply, I see.

        Good for him.

        1. don’t you have a sister to fuck?

      3. Whether you think fucking soccer moms will help end the drug war,

        As icky as I find soccer moms, I might actually fuck one of them if it would help end the insane War on Drugs.

    3. Soccer moms are the worst people ever.

  12. I think this will be yet another issue where our Ruling Class leads from behind.

    I suspect you could run those poll numbers into the high 60s without any serious action at the federal level.

    At some unkown point, for some doubtless trivial reason, legalization will just . . . crystallize and become uncontroversial outside of a fringe of hardcore wodders. Could be in a couple years, could be in thirty.

    1. This is largely true of all the “social” issues.

      Elections seem to make more of a difference on economics and wars.

      1. Elections seem to make more of a difference on economics and wars.

        I guess, in the same way that any positive number is greater than zero.

    2. Could be never.
      Legalization felt a whole lot closer in the mid/late 1970s than it does now.

      1. it did feel that way, because there didn’t seem to be such an array of forces against it. So even though more are in favor now, that support is a mile wide and an inch thin, while the opposition is few but seem to care about it a whole lot.

    3. RC, the idea that “legalization will just crystallize” has been around since the 70’s. NOT! It’s going to take hard work, organization, civil discourse, and all of the discipline and effort that any kind of positive social change has required since we dragged ourselves out of the Dark Ages five hundred years ago (more or less). We have to get young people registered to vote; we have to stay on-message; we have to hold elected officials accountable. “Just crystallize” is a bong-dream; don’t let the prohibitionists lull us into inaction!

  13. Depressing sidenote: 50% are in favor of sending you to prison for using a plant grown on six continents.

    Of that 50%, a huge chunk of them are probably assuming “okay, so we tax it and regulate it like cigarettes and alcohol”.
    So, probably >20% are actually in favor of complete decriminalization and deregulation.

    I’m not cheering for these results.

    1. Congratulations, you discovered the depressing aspect of every single poll.

      Your prize is to be mournfully misanthropic.

      Still, low standards for our fellow man. Low, hopeful standards.

      1. Aim low and you’ll never be disappointed, right?

        1. Aim low and you’ll never be disappointed, right?

          Because the recoil walks the point of impact up the target?

          1. Well yeah if you don’t wait to site back in..

      2. That’s a good one.

  14. It costs Obama nothing to declare war on medical marijuana, since California is in the bag for Obama in 2012. So Obama can suck up to his right wing donors without risking a single electoral vote.

    It’s Clintonian triangulation at its best. And public policy at its worst. Hope and change, baby.

    1. Obama has right wing donors? I mean, maybe in 08 but anyone who gives money to Obama in 12 is not a right winger.

      1. Think LEO and Prison Guard unions.

        1. and pharma. They do not want pot legal.

          1. It’s Big Alcohol that really pours money into the prohib effort.

  15. That picture would be in better perspective if Snoop Dogg were holding the sign.

  16. Support for legalizing marijuana is directly and inversely proportional to age, ranging from 62% approval among those 18 to 29 down to 31% among those 65 and older

    So what you’re saying is that this country has made Zero(tm) progress on this front since the sixties. We’re still not trusting anyone over 40?

  17. Basically the problem is old conservative republican southern women. Given the fact the the overall pro-legalization percentage has been increasing for 40 years, and that the percentage who favor legalization has increased with each generation; I think it’s only a matter of time. Afterall, the age groups most opposed to legalization will be dying the soonest.

    1. Every time I read comments like this they seem reasoned, cogent, logical and well spoken.

      It’s just that I’ve been hearing nearly the same demographic analysis for over 25 years… those anti-drug buzz-kill geezers are dying off… then we’ll be in charge!

  18. Basically the problem is old conservative republican southern women.

    Yup, if not for this vital Progressive Democrat constituency Obama and Biden would make Timothy Leary look like Carrie Nation!

  19. So how come legalization in California failed then? It had popular support, but it wasn’t even that close a vote…

    1. Hippie growers and the medical MJ lobby were opposed to legalization.

      1. Yeah, a buddy of mine from San Francisco who’s been legally and illegally smoking pot for the past 16 years wasn’t convinced legalization was a good idea. You know, because there are 1 or 2 counties who’s livelihood depends on growing medical marijuana. By that logic, you should need a prescription to buy a car, and you can only buy GM because otherwise Detroit’s economy might suffer. Oh shit…nevermind…forget I said anything…

  20. Jesus said to do unto others as we would have them to do unto us. None of us would want our child thrown in jail with the sexual predators over marijuana. None of us would want to see an older family member’s home confiscated and sold by the police for growing a couple of marijuana plants for their aches and pains. It’s time to stop putting our own family members in jail over marijuana.
    If ordinary Americans could grow a little marijuana in their own back yards, it would be about as valuable as home-grown tomatoes. Let’s put the criminals out of business and get them out of our neighborhoods. Let’s let ordinary Americans grow a little marijuana in their own back yards.
    Here’s one way that IT IS REALLY WORKING: Arresting the criminals and collecting a fee from registered growers (and bringing in thousands of dollars to support the county budget); what a great plan! This is the way to build a better America! http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/pages/…..iment.html
    The current proposal before Congress, bill HR 2306, will allow states to decide how they will regulate marijuana. You can email your Congressperson and Senators at http://www.usa.gov/Contact/Elected.shtml to discuss HR 2306.
    And a big THANK YOU to the courageous, freedom loving legislators, governors, and countless others who are working so hard to bring this through! You’re doing a great patriotic service for all of America!

  21. 1) EVERYONE that sees these links sign up and weigh in on the debate
    http://pvox.co/CdiFqY

    http://wh.gov/gf3
    2) Propagate those links and ensure that everyone that sees them go to those sites.

    Too many people are blaming the President for enforcing the federal marijuana prohibition. Contact Congress (the LEGISLATIVE branch [that’s the important one when it comes to law]) via the first link. Contact Obama (the EXECUTIVE branch [until Obama vetos a passed H.R. 2306 it’s on Congress – but tell Obama anyway]) via the second link. It really is THAT easy. Participate in democracy!

  22. The illegal drug trade is now estimated to be somewhere in the region of $400 billion a year ( equal to the defense budget ). This “former land of the free” arrests 1.5 million of it’s citizens a year for drug law violations, half for marijuana alone, The majority of the 2.2 million inmates in the USA are incarcerated because of this insane drug war (Prohibition 2) at a staggering cost to all taxpayers and trauma to their families.

    Prisons have been filled to capacity. Violent criminals, murderers, rapists and child molesters are released early to create space for these so called drug offenders. Half of court trial time and also a huge chunk of police officers time is pointlessly wasted. Enormous untaxed profits from illegal drugs fund multi-national criminal empires which bribe law enforcement authorities and spread corruption faster than a raging bush fire. These laws take violent criminals and turn them into multi-billionaires whilst corrupting even entire countries such as Columbia, Panama, Mexico and Afghanistan. The extreme violence on and south of the border is drug gangs fighting for turf in this lucrative business. The drug laws are also funding the Taliban whose illegal opium profits allow it to buy weapons and pay it’s fighters more than $300 a month, compared with the $14 paid to an Afghan policemen.

    When governments prohibit drugs they effectively and knowingly hand a monopoly on their sale to dangerous criminals and terrorists. Without a legal framework in which to operate, these black-market entities can always be expected to settle their disputes violently, while terrorizing many peaceful and innocent citizens in the process. Were the users of alcohol to blame for the St Valentines massacre in the US in 1929? Of course not! It is just as naive to assume that one can compel all the users of Marijuana or Cocaine to simply quit, as it is to assume that all the users of Alcohol should have stopped drinking after the introduction of alcohol prohibition in 1919.

    The definition of insanity is great folly, madness, extreme senselessness, lunacy. Prohibition can be described as being all of the above and may therefor, along with all it’s supporters, be deemed insane.

    Each day you remain silent, you help to destroy the Constitution, fill the prisons with our children, and empower terrorists and criminals worldwide while wasting hundreds of billions of your own tax dollars. Prohibition bears many strong and startling similarities to Torquemada?’s inquisition?, it’s supporters are servants of tyranny and hate who’s sole purpose is to make the rest of us suffer their putrid legacy of incalculable waste and destruction.

    Protect our Children; Legalize, Regulate & Tax!

  23. Jesus said to do unto others as we would have them to do unto us. None of us would want our child thrown in jail with the sexual predators over marijuana. None of us would want to see an older family member’s home confiscated and sold by the police for growing a couple of marijuana plants for their aches and pains. It’s time to stop putting our own family members in jail over marijuana.
    If ordinary Americans could grow a little marijuana in their own back yards, it would be about as valuable as home-grown tomatoes. Let’s put the criminals out of business and get them out of our neighborhoods. Let’s let ordinary Americans grow a little marijuana in their own back yards.
    You can email your Congressperson and Senators at http://www.usa.gov/Contact/Elected.shtml to discuss HR 2306, the bill that would repeal Federal prohibition.
    And a big THANK YOU to the courageous, freedom loving legislators, governors, and countless others who are working so hard to bring this through! You’re doing a great patriotic service for all of America!

    Here’s one way that IT IS REALLY WORKING: Arresting the criminals and collecting a fee from registered growers (and bringing in thousands of dollars to support the county budget); what a great plan! This is the way to build a better America! http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/pages/…..iment.html

  24. Marijuana should be legalized-
    The arguments for why it should be illegal often contain these key points:
    1) Gateway Drug
    2) Affects Driving
    3) Is Addictive

    1-every other drug, including cigarettes and alcohol fall into this category | it is separate from marijuana
    2-this is why it should be regulated like wine: of age consumption ONLY, and NO driving while affected by it
    3-‘habit forming’ yes, but so are non-drugs | ‘addictive’ not so much: even a heavy user can quit cold-turkey without tremors or health risks

    Debate it here:
    http://lrmjd.blogspot.com/

    I challenge you to think.

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