Government Spending

Hot For Teachers' Votes (By Giving Away Our Money)

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Last week, the feds kicked in $10 billion to save the teachers from draconian cuts due to recession, etc. Some pertinent facts: According to a University of Washington researcher, total job losses at public schools (all staff, not just teachers) would have been maybe 100,000 without further funds. Which sounds like a lot until you realize that over 6 million folks are employed by the system.

Then there's this:

For decades our elementary and secondary schools have focused on adding teachers and support personnel, a hugely expensive strategy that scarcely has moved the needle on student achievement. Nationally, public school enrollment has grown about 9 percent since 1970, while the number of paid staff has grown 85 percent (including a 50 percent increase in teachers) during the same time. Research by the online Education Intelligence Agency shows that from 2003 to 2008, 38 states increased their teacher work forces at a greater rate than student enrollment. In Iowa and Kentucky, one new teacher was hired for every two new students over the five-year period. In states like Michigan, Maryland and Pennsylvania, the number of teaching positions grew at substantial rates while the number of students actually declined.

So does that sort of failure to match supply with demand factor into who gets what new stimuleratin' dollars or how they have to spend em? Nope:

In return for a bailout, Congress at least could have demanded necessary changes to policies that weight teacher dismissal policies based on seniority. No incentives were included to help states and local districts end the common practice of "last in, first out." Following such rigid union work rules helps to ensure that districts dismiss more lower- paid teachers rather than lay off the least effective instructors or reach responsible settlements to freeze wages and save jobs.

The edujobs bailout provides more than twice the resources set aside for the reform-driven $4.35 billion Race to the Top competition. It also follows the more than $100 billion in education stimulus funding authorized in February 2009. Congress and the Obama administration have staked far more money on the status quo than on substantive change.

Read more here.

Hat Tip: Mike Krause, Independence Institute.

And to top it off, if the movies are true, then teachers' jobs are just getting easier and easier since the Summer of Love. Take it away, Up the Down Staircase!

NEXT: The American Muslim Success Story

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  1. Last week, the feds kicked in $10 billion to save the teachers from draconian cuts due to recession, etc. Some pertinent facts: According to a University of Washington researcher, total job losses at public schools (all staff, not just teachers) would have been maybe 100,000 without further funds.

    Is my math wrong or is that $100,000 per job? Somebody’s getting fucked here and I think it’s me.

    1. if you don’t know who’s the mark, it’s probably you

  2. In a country with six million teachers, Gillespie managed to remain a semi-literate fuck who couldn’t make it in a real job in some third-world backwater. It’s probably genetic.

    1. The Type II retard is the saddest of all retards, as it is completely avoidable.

      1. It typically can be controlled with diet, to some extent; however this case appears to be uncontrollable.

      2. If only Max had controlled his intake of hatred, he might not have developed retardation. Now he has to take H&R every day.

        1. Mmmmmm, Coke Hate. I could use me some hate right fucking now.

          1. Maybe you should stick to Diet Hate so that you don’t end up like Max. It has far less rage than regular Hate.

    2. did you go to public school to learn to write like that?

    3. Err “Max” you should read this:

      In 1996, Gillespie received his Ph.D. in English literature from the State University of New York at Buffalo. He also holds an M.A. in English with a concentration in creative writing from Temple University and a B.A. in English and Psychology from Rutgers University.

    4. BTW “Max”, what advanced degrees do you possess?

      1. A PhuckuD.

    5. Wow, somehow the electricity was restored to your mother’s trailer. If you both were to die in an electrical fire, her failure would be complete.

    6. This HAS to be a Max spoof. No way he could put together such a coherent sentence.

  3. I hate cop unions (and their law and order boot licking enablers) the most but the NEA/AFT (and the teachers pets who forgot how much of their time was completely wasted in high school) are moving up fast on the outside.

    1. I hope that when you need a cop, you cell phone fails, you fucking moron.

      1. I hope the next time you are on your cell phone a cop thinks its a cell phone gun…

      2. “I hope that when you need a cop, you cell phone fails, you fucking moron.”

        “Semi-literate fuck” alert!

      3. I hope the next time you’re on a cell phone, you’re in Denver.

      4. Let me think about my interactions with the police over the past few years.

        2 stolen property reports over the phone. 1 accident where they never filed the report. 1 ticket for disregarding an officer, since I can’t read a cop’s mind.

        Yeah, just speaking personally, they’ve been pretty much been completely fucking worthless, even when I did have an issue. So I guess if my cell phone battery dies, I’ll just have to handle things myself. Just like always, Max.

      5. Max, I hope the next time you need a cop, you get one that is actually qualified, not just one that has seniority.

        1. Max just loves to lick the cunt of statism.

          AND his mom.

        2. >cop
          >qualified

          Doesn’t being “qualified” as a cop involve enjoying beating someone until their eye socket ruptures and enjoying it?

          1. I always thought “Nightstick Sodomy 101” was a pre-req…

  4. Let me be clear…

    The only way to solve a problem, any problem ever, is by throwing more money at. Failing schools? Throw money. Hungry piranha? Throw some money. Floating in the vaccuum of space? Toss them bills.

    We can always borrow/print more. It’s the perfect solution.

    1. Bad analogy. That space thing could actually work.

      1. Indeed. If your tether broke, and you needed to get back to your spaceship, and all you had was a fat sack of cash, you could throw the cash in the other direction, which would propel you towards the spaceship. Ideally you would reach into the sack and throw wads of cash, though, so you could “adjust” your trajectory if you got it a bit wrong at first.

      2. How much money would you need to create sufficient momentum to get you anywhere? (Is scientifically semi-literate and does not remember Newton’s Laws)

        1. Well, for every action there is an equal and opposite reaction. So when you fire a rifle, the bullet of a certain mass is propelled at a certain velocity (which you multiply together or something to get a certain force), and your shoulder is propelled backwards with an equal amount of force.

          The same principle should hold true with money. How much would really depend on what form the money was in. Ideally it would be pennies, because only a small amount of pennies would be needed to get you up to a decent clip. As this would most likely be a government operation, though, it would most likely be in hundreds.

          Assuming a 100 dollar bill weighs 1 gram and you had a mass of 126kg with a spacesuit on, if you threw ~136,000 100 dollar bills backwards at 5m/s you should go forwards at 5m/s. I think. Someone check my math/science.

        2. Any amount in the vacuum of space would work given enough time. The force applied to the money would also act on you in the equal and opposite vector. Since f=ma, you could throw more money(m) or give it a larger acceleration(a) to increase the force sending you back to the spaceship.

          1. Your explanation is more accurate than mine, I think, since it is acceleration and not velocity. So ignore a good bit of what I said…

  5. “Nationally, public school enrollment has grown about 9 percent since 1970, while the number of paid staff has grown 85 percent (including a 50 percent increase in teachers) during the same time.”

    I like to point out these kinds of facts when discussing education with others. I also point out that real spending on education has doubled over the last 30 years. A K-12 education now runs, on average, over $140,000. These numbers, plus the massive inflation of college costs, are unsustainable. This is yet another area where the scumbags in charge continue to kick the can down the road. The day of reckoning awaits.

  6. Nationally, public school enrollment has grown about 9 percent since 1970, while the number of paid staff has grown 85 percent (including a 50 percent increase in teachers) during the same time.

    If the increase in overall paid staff is 85%, and the increase in teachers just 50%, then the increase in non-teaching staff must be just ridiculously high.

  7. I hate this as much as the rest of y’all, but frankly, the breeding sheeple of America asked for it. These increases are a joint fleecing from both the NEA, and dimwitted parents who refuse to meet their own needs or take responsibility for their own kids’ problems.

    It’s a Federal law (EHA, IDEA, FAPE, dating from 1975) that all God’s precious little tards deserve a free education. So part of that 85% boost in staffing is because parents of kids who have great careers ahead of them as potted plants and Depends testers have demanded additional publicly-funded staff for their little Corkys, their precious ADD and ADHD snowflakes, their autistic Baby Hueys. Sometimes, these kids have a staff ratio of 3-to-1 at all times, even in a mainstream public school.

    Go to a public school board meeting sometime, then suggest that the school could save money if parents of “speshl” children took greater responsibility for those kids’ extremely expensive litany of needs. Then see if you can make it out to your car at the end of the evening without getting the crap beat out of you.

    Parents have also absurdly demanded that schools be absolutely risk-free. Zero-tolerance policies are there because schools get sued if Junior’s exposed to peanut butter, his teacher pats him on the back, he eats a pork hot dog but he’s Muslim, his teacher puts his mouthy and disruptive little ass in the corner, he’s deprived of his diploma because his grades suck and he’s failing, he gets sick after eating a whole box of Ex-Lax…and on. And on.

    Lately, they’re demanding the kind of meals from a school cafeteria that you see on the menu at a Wolfgang Puck joint. “Local! Baa-Baaa! Fresh! Organic! Baa-aa! Healthy! Ba-aa!” The (allegedly) poor are demanding these meals for free, because paying their kids’ school lunch bill cramps their cell phone and nail salon budget.

    Do you still have these strange things called “school bus stops” in your area? We no longer do, in WA. The school bus stops directly in front of a kid’s house. And actually waits for the kid to come out. I’ve seen this countless times, on my commute. Because Junior is a delicate, wee hothouse flower who can’t possibly be expected to walk a couple of blocks to a designated stop on a prescribed schedule.

    The sense of entitlement on both parental and union sides is gobsmacking.

    Trimming the fat in this budget doesn’t start with the teacher’s unions. It starts with us being a lot less comfortable with willingly outsourcing our responsibilities to government.

    1. I hate this as much as the rest of y’all, but frankly, the breeding sheeple of America asked for it.

      I didn’t ask for it.

    2. ZE, I agree with your assessment.

      I would add that the entitlements and mandates have spawned colonies of parasites and rent seekers. In addition to the teacher ratios cited by you and Nick, the speschl boys and girls require teachers’ aides, social workers, psychologists, DARE liasons, grief counselors, school “safety” officers, companions, dieticians and behavioral counselors to name a few. Some of these leeches are unionized; some are not. Some are employees of companies whose hands are permanently attached to your wallet.

      In Massachusetts, I can speak to several suburban, high per capita income communities, including my current town, regarding the bus stops. If I leave the house at the wrong time in the morning, the brakes on my wife’s Camry get lots of practice. There are no longer any designated bus stops as each and every kid is picked up in front of her house.

  8. Teachers get bailed out, union skims their dues off the top and donate to democrats to keep the ponzi scheme going.

  9. Net tax recipients shouldn’t get to vote.

  10. If the increase in overall paid staff is 85%, and the increase in teachers just 50%, then the increase in non-teaching staff must be just ridiculously high.

  11. the worst way to miss someone is to be sitting right beside them knowing you can’t have them.

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