Litigation

Federal Reserve Loses Lawsuit; Will Have to Divulge Loan Recipients

|

The "audit the Fed" bill hasn't passed yet, but the courts are already striking blows for Federal Reserve transparency, as reported by Bloomberg, about a lawsuit filed by Bloomberg:

The Federal Reserve must for the first time identify the companies in its emergency lending programs after losing a Freedom of Information Act lawsuit.

Manhattan Chief U.S. District Judge Loretta Preska ruled against the central bank yesterday, rejecting the argument that loan records aren't covered by the law because their disclosure would harm borrowers' competitive positions.

The Fed has refused to name the financial firms it lent to or disclose the amounts or the assets put up as collateral under 11 programs, most put in place during the deepest financial crisis since the Great Depression, saying that doing so might set off a run by depositors and unsettle shareholders. Bloomberg LP, the New York-based company majority-owned by Mayor Michael Bloomberg, sued on Nov. 7 on behalf of its Bloomberg News unit…..

The judge said the central bank "improperly withheld agency records" by "conducting an inadequate search" after Bloomberg News reporters filed a request under the information act. She gave the Fed five days to turn over documents it told the reporters it located, including 231 pages of reports, and said it must look for more at the Federal Reserve Bank of New York, which runs most of the loan programs….

Bloomberg said in the suit that U.S. taxpayers need to know the terms of Fed lending because the public became an "involuntary investor" in the nation's banks as the financial crisis deepened and the government began shoring up companies with capital injections and loans….."When an unprecedented amount of taxpayer dollars were lent to financial institutions in unprecedented ways and the Federal Reserve refused to make public any of the details of its extraordinary lending, Bloomberg News asked the court why U.S. citizens don't have the right to know," said Matthew Winkler, the editor-in-chief of Bloomberg News. "We're gratified the court is defending the public's right to know what is being done in the public interest."

Federal Reserve chief Ben Bernanke may be keeping his job, as Tim Cavanaugh blogged below, but looks like he'll have to do it with a little more openness to we, the people, and thank you Judge Preska. The Fed has not yet said whether it intends to appeal.