Overseas/Interdiction

Return to the House of Death

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The Washington Times picks up the House of Death story, first blogged here last December, and doggedly reported by Texas investigative journalist Bill Conroy.

Sandalio "Sandy" Gonzalez, a now-retired U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) senior executive service supervisor, and other high-ranking DEA officials are demanding a congressional investigation into the use by federal agents of a "homicidal maniac" as a paid informant in a probe of a Juarez drug gang and the failure of federal prosecutors who oversaw the case to stop it — even after they learned of the informant's role in the killings.

U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) agents and federal prosecutors, according to Mr. Gonzalez, went to "extreme lengths" to protect the informant, adding that a dozen persons might be alive today had those in charge pulled the plug on the investigation.

This needs to be a much, much bigger scandal. Particularly in light of the congressional hearings last July, in which an FBI representative couldn't assure members of the House Judiciary Committee that the agency had policies in place to make sure its agents weren't looking the other way while its own informants were committing violent crimes.

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  1. Gee, when you get Turkish costume sellers saying it’s a “nice comment,” you know your message is getting out there? 🙁 I’ve seen a lot more comment spam on H&R lately.

    If it wasn’t the gubmint behind this everyone involved would be rotting in jail for conspiracy to commit murder. I think one of the best things for this country would be if the laws applied equally to those in charge of “upholding” them. Instead they get a free pass to do the most heinous things with no consequence. No need to be a criminal since you can be in the government and do the same things at almost no risk…

  2. This is one of the few times the Congressional hearings power might be put to good use. I hope they can squeeze it in around Barry Bonds’ umpteenth appearance.

  3. I don’t imagine members of the outer party would face charges for harming the proles like this.

  4. I don’t imagine members of the outer party would face charges for harming the proles like this.

    The Ministry of Love cares for all citizens equally, brother. As you shall soon see.

  5. This would make a nice topic for the Presidential “debate.” How do you suppose Rudy would react?

  6. Instead they get a free pass to do the most heinous things with no consequence.

    it’s good to be the king.

  7. I think one of the best things for this country would be if the laws applied equally to those in charge of “upholding” them. Instead they get a free pass to do the most heinous things with no consequence. No need to be a criminal since you can be in the government and do the same things at almost no risk…

    Reminds me of Saddam’s Iraq. I am so tired of law enforcement exempting themselves fron the law and our elected official ignoring it.

  8. No need to be a criminal since you can be in the government and do the same things at almost no risk…

    Honestly, this is really the case. Have a hankering for having power over other people? Like the idea of smashing down doors and stepping on people’s heads? Does having a full-auto submachine gun without getting BATFE permits sound groovy? Join the government. All your thug dreams come true, and you are totally legit too! Why would anyone join the mob any more?

  9. right on Episiarch right on

  10. Silence Gives Consent! (We need a short, catchy slogan to summarize these situations.)

  11. Silence … you mean like on this comments thread? Thank you Radley for getting this (extremely important) story out to a wider audience but it does look like there’s apathy in the reason part of the world. Or is it just that this story is so terribly heartbreaking and depressing that we’re at a loss for words?

    CL

  12. “Or is it just that this story is so terribly heartbreaking and depressing that we’re at a loss for words?”

    CL;

    You are right, this is just so heinous, I, for one, can’t come up with a response, except WTF?

    Why isn’t the MSM going after this like a pack of hounds?

    Another this that just occured to me, even if we are mad / sad / outraged. What can we do about it?

    The impotent rage of Libertarians falls equally on the selective hearing of those under the heel of the jackboots as it does on those in power.

  13. this = thought

  14. The fact that this story is actually in the Washington Times qualifies as a pleasant surprise. Anything which illuminates the moral corruption of the drug war to the general public should be welcomed.

  15. A spokesman has said that the agents “controlling” this “homicidal maniac” had no duty to stop his murders, or report them afterwards. Many policemen know of serious crime or violation of civil rights committed by other police and don’t seem to think that they have a duty to stop it or report it. Tell them all: “Silence Gives Consent.”

  16. Testing.

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