Campaigns/Elections

Go West, Young Democrat

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The Democratic Party (last seen feebly protesting the troop surge into Iraq) has chosen Denver as the site of its 2008 convention. It's the first time the city's ever hosted such an event since 1908, and it beat New York—the successful nominating home of Bill Clinton in 1992—for the job. (It'll probably be held more than a month after the LP convention in Denver.)

Denver's bid was shot through with holes from the start. The first technical submission was greeted with dismay by party regulars; revised bids were better. Labor unions threatened to balk unless Denver began to unionize its hotels; others wanted to extract compromises from the DNC and the state about union participation. The DNC worried about whether Denver could raise the $50 million necessary to stage the marquee event for the '08 Dem nominee. Promises by out of state governors to raise millions were greeted skeptically.

It was not immediately clear what made Dean comfortable that Denver had settled these issues.

Conventions are growing less and less important with every election (as much as we'd like to hope the 2008 GOP convention starts with McCain, Rudy, and Sam Brownback deadlocked with 836 votes apiece, it won't happen), but this makes a little news. 1) There may be something to the Democrats' push to win Western voters over to overwhelm the Republican south and plains states. 2) Denver is the nucleus of a far less liberal breed of Democrat than New York; Gov. Bill Ritter, Sen. Ken Salazar, former Gov. Dick Lamm, and lots of conservative Democrats in the neighboring states. 3) If Hillary Clinton expects a coronation, she'll have to bring her own throne.

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  1. Hey, the Dems copied us! The Libertarian Party already picked Denver for our 2008 convention.

  2. Good move by the Democrats, I think. Holding their convention in Denver helps to distance the party from their “blue state” image yet since cities usually are more liberal than rural areas they’ll still get a postitive response.

    The Democrats should always hold their conventions in unconquered territory.

  3. Colorado LP should file suit to prevent any taxpayer funds from being spent on the Democratic convention. Failing that, sue to have proportional sums spent on the Libertarian National Convention. No more second or third class citizens!

  4. Goddammit.

  5. the Dems copied us! The Libertarian Party already picked Denver for our 2008 convention.

    Seems appropriate, then.

  6. Dick Lamm. I haven’t heard that name in a while. What a clown. He once said that old people need to hurry up and die so they won’t be such a burden on society.

  7. Mediageek,

    I expect to see footage of you at the convention with a pro-gun picket sign in the “Free speech zone” on C-Span 🙂

  8. Wait wait, did i read that correctly, Denver foots the bill, 50 million dollars for the convention to be held??

    They can keep thier damn convention then…

    what a waste of tax payers money if that is the case.

  9. mk-

    LOL!

    “Have you hugged your assault rifle today?”

  10. May I point out that Dick Lamm’s comment only encapsulates what many people think the Libertarian position is, as well?

    If you can explain to me how his callousness does NOT mirror libertarian policies, please inform me.

  11. Wait wait, did i read that correctly, Denver foots the bill, 50 million dollars for the convention to be held??

    They can keep thier damn convention then…

    what a waste of tax payers money if that is the case.

    How can you tell if it’s a waste of taxpayer money without first factoring in the benefits of holding the convention? I’m guessing a lot of people will be coming to Denver and they’ll spend a ton of money. Not to mention the prestige factor and the massive amount of positive publicity from the media for the city.

  12. If Hillary Clinton expects a coronation, she’ll have to bring her own throne.

    I think she keeps one around for good luck, like a cigar.

  13. Think of the South Park episodes this could spawn! What’s to keep every hippie in California from coming to Colorado to protest, pissing off Eric Cartman to no end?

    Kevin

  14. Well, buck, the hookers will love it for sure.

    And if there’s a group I don’t mind getting a subsidy, it’s them. But only because it’s such a beautiful poke in the eye to the morality brigade that most politicians belong to.

  15. I’m guessing a lot of people will be coming to Denver and they’ll spend a ton of money. Not to mention the prestige factor and the massive amount of positive publicity from the media for the city.

    If that were the case, the city would not have to put up 50 million to host the convention: the people benefitting from the increased trade would be putting it up themselves voluntarily.

    These boondogles generally cost more than they rake in. By having tax payers foot the costs, the guys raking in the money are able to show a handsome “profit”.

  16. I’d like to see a post-conventions article somewhere that compares and contrasts the hooker angle between Minneapolis and Denver. I’d especially like it if the author were to take some anecdotes about individuals and then conflate the reported behavior to the political parties as a whole. That’d be fascinating.

    The LP convention hooker article would just be too damned depressing to contemplate.

  17. If that were the case, the city would not have to put up 50 million to host the convention: the people benefitting from the increased trade would be putting it up themselves voluntarily.

    But the city is the group of people who will benefit, so they’re the ones putting up the money. The people of Denver elect leaders to decide where to best invest the city’s money, and I guess in this case they’ve made that decision.


    These boondogles generally cost more than they rake in. By having tax payers foot the costs, the guys raking in the money are able to show a handsome “profit”.

    Maybe, maybe not. But the amount that is raked in at the time does not represent the full benefit of having a national political convention. $50 million might end up being a real bargain for the amount of exposure the city is going to receive.

  18. “If that were the case, the city would not have to put up 50 million to host the convention: the people benefitting from the increased trade would be putting it up themselves voluntarily.”

    So what grade are you in?

  19. “I’d like to see a post-conventions article somewhere that compares and contrasts the hooker angle between Minneapolis and Denver.”

    http://4thwardcaretaskforce.org/index.cfm?action=offenders

    Select “prostitution”

    Denver?

  20. I’ll donate to Denver just to keep them away from my city.

  21. Labor unions threatened to balk unless Denver began to unionize its hotels

    This makes it sound like the City of Denver either owns the hotels or is willing to strongarm them into unionizing.

  22. “I’m guessing a lot of people will be coming to Denver and they’ll spend a ton of money.”

    Sorry. The people spending money are panicked Denverites currently booking tickets on United and Frontier to get *out* of Denver that week, and probably the week before…

  23. Where is Denver?

  24. “Where is Denver?”

    According to Buck, no one will know until after the Democratic National Convention.

  25. Just like nobody knows what Coca-Cola is, that’s why they keep advertising.

  26. Was this place named after John Denver or Bob Denver?

  27. Over North Pimp: That is one scary set of photos. I wasn’t expecting Pretty Woman, but . . . yikes.

  28. Edward | January 11, 2007, 3:55pm
    Where is Denver?

    http://www.theonion.com/content/node/31079

    ‘Midwest’ Discovered Between East And West Coasts

    July 6, 2005 | Issue 41?27

    NEW YORK-A U.S. Geological Survey expeditionary force announced Tuesday that it has discovered a previously unknown and unexplored land mass between the New York and California coasts known as the “Midwest.”

    image: http://www.theonion.com/content/files/images/onion_news3270.jpg

    The Geological Survey team discovered the vast region while searching for the fabled Midwest Passage, the mythical overland route passing through the uncharted area between Ithaca, NY, and Bakersfield, CA.

    “I long suspected something was there,” said Franklin Eldred, a Manhattan native and leader of the 200-man exploratory force. “I’d flown between New York and L.A. on business many times, and the unusually long duration of my flights seemed to indicate that some sort of large area was being traversed, an area of unknown composition.”

    The Geological Survey explorers left the East Coast three weeks ago, embarking on a perilous journey to the unknown. Not long after crossing the Adirondack Mountains, Eldred and his team were blazing trails through strange new regions, wild lands full of corn and wheat.

    “Thus far we have discovered places known as Michigan, Minnesota and Wisconsin,” said Randall Zachary, chief navigator for the expedition. “When translated from the local dialect into English, these words seem to mean ‘summer camp.'”

    Eldred and the others were surprised to learn that the Midwest, whose inhospitable environment was long believed to be incapable of supporting human life, is indeed populated, albeit sparsely.

    “The Midwestern Aborigines are ruddy, generally heavy-set folk, clad in plain, non-designer costumery,” Eldred said. “They tend to live in simple, one-story dwellings whose interiors are decorated with Hummels and ‘Bless This House’ needlepoint wall-hangings. And though coarse and unattractive, these simple people were rather friendly, offering us quaint native fare such as ‘hotdish’ and ‘casserole.'”

    Though the Midwest territory is still largely unexplored, early reports describe a region as backwards as it is vast. “Many of the basic aspects of a civilized culture appear to be entirely absent,” said Gina Strauch, a Los Angeles-based anthropologist. “There is no theater to speak of, and their knowledge of posh restaurants is sketchy at best. Further, their agricentric lives seem to prevent them from pursuing high fashion to any degree, and, as a result, their mode of dress is largely restricted to sweatpants and sweatshirts, the women’s being adorned with hearts and teddy bears and the men’s with college-football insignias.”

    Despite the Midwesterners’ considerable cultural backwardness, some say the establishment of relations with them is possible.

    “Believe it or not, this region may have things to offer us,” said Jonathan Ogleby, a San Francisco-area marketing expert. “We could construct an airport there, a place where New Yorkers could switch planes on their way to California. We could stage revivals of old Broadway musicals there. Perhaps we could even one day conduct trade with the Midwesterners, offering them electronic devices in exchange for meats and agriculture.”

    Others, however, are not so optimistic about future relations. “We must remember that these people are not at all like us,” Conde Nast publisher and Manhattan socialite Lucille Randolph Snowdon said. “They are crude and provincial, bewildered by our tall buildings and our art galleries, our books and our coffee shops. For an L.A. resident to attempt to interact with one of them as he or she would with, say, a Bostonian is ludicrous. It appears unlikely that we will ever be able to conduct a genuine exchange of ideas with them about anything, save perhaps television or ‘the big game.'”

  29. Denver isn’t in the Midwest. Oh, and more is spent on theater tickest in Minneapolis — per capita — than in any city other than New York.

  30. I had no idea “Our Town” was still running.

    I keed, I keed.

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