I'll Take That Explosion in the Distance as a "Yes"

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Buried in Robert Reid's report on an Iraqi market attack is this unfortunate coincidence.

The attack occurred as U.S. Commerce Secretary Carlos Gutierrez arrived in the Iraqi capital for meetings aimed at jump-starting Iraq's economy. Gutierrez signed an agreement with the Iraqis to encourage foreign investment, acknowledging that the country's deteriorating security made that goal a challenge.

Continued Gutierrez: "Um, and can we close that window?"

(Via Doug Bandow.)

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  1. The attack occurred as U.S. Commerce Secretary Carlos Gutierrez arrived in the Iraqi capital for meetings aimed at jump-starting Iraq’s economy.

    You know, they should spearhead some kind of campaign to develop tourism. I know I’ve always wanted to see the ruins of Babylon.

    …Maybe some kind of adventure tourism!

  2. His uncle thought he was St. Jerome…

  3. Funniest title ever.

  4. I thought cracking the windows reduced the likelihood of them being blown in by the concussive force of a blast. Though I figure Gutierrez and Weigel have more experience with such matters.

  5. I prohesy that a guy could make a pretty decent living off a Safelight Glass franchise in Baghdad. I reckon I’ll look into it.

  6. “You know, they should spearhead some kind of campaign to develop tourism. I know I’ve always wanted to see the ruins of Babylon.”

    They are pretty cool, I went in 03′. It is out in the desert no where near the present Euphrates. Must be global warming. Husain had built a sort of little Disney world there with a gift shop, parking lot, and reconstructed walls in someplace. king Hammurabi had inscribed his name on each brick on some of the walls. When Sadam had parts of the walls topped off with new bricks he had his name put on them instead!

  7. sam:

    I like that.

    “Antiquities, new and improved!”

  8. Ken
    Sorry. The adventure tourism idea is already taken. They call it the All Volunteer Army. Adventurism assured under the Bush Administration.

  9. Sorry. The adventure tourism idea is already taken. They call it the All Volunteer Army.

    Yeah, but, a lot of people don’t have that much time to spare. They need to squeeze it all down into a week or so. Here’s a sample itinerary:

    Day 1-2: USA or Canada / Baghdad, Iraq

    Your adventure begins as you descend in a spiral pattern, avoiding small arms fire and ground to air missiles, directly over the Baghdad International Airport. Once on the ground, your friendly tour guide will help you secure your helmet and flak jacket (Armor scavenging excursion optional), then off you go via “Route Irish” to the Green Zone, where we’ll be staying at the once fabulous Republican Palace. There will be a welcome dinner.

    Day 3: Hanging Gardens / Abu Gharib

    Spend the morning wandering the ancient ruins of the city of Babylon. Your well armed and knowledgeable tour guide will point out all the amazing features from the impressive gate to where the “Hanging Gardens” are thought to have been. We’ll spend the afternoon at the infamous Abu Gharib prison, where you’ll observe military dogs in training and attend a demonstration of “water boarding”. Dinner will be comprised of authentic “MREs”

    …and so on.

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