Why Did Baby-Burning Drug Warriors Think There Were No Children in the Home They Attacked? [UPDATED]

WSB-TVWSB-TVLast week Habersham County, Georgia, Sheriff Joey Terrell, explaining how a SWAT team critically injured 19-month-old Bounkham Phonesavanh by tossing a flash-bang grenade into the toddler's playpen during a 3 a.m. drug raid on Wednesday, said members of the team, which consisted of his deputies and local police officers from Cornelia, never would have used such a "distraction device" if they had realized children were living in the home they were attacking. "If there's children involved in a house, we do not use any kind of distraction devices in those houses," Terrell told AccessNorthGa.com. "We just don't take the chance on it....According to the confidential informant, there were no children. When they made the buy, they didn't see any children or any evidence of children there, so we proceeded with our standard operation."

But according to a lawyer hired by Bounkham's parents, Bounkham and Alecia Phonesavanh, even the most rudimentary surveillance would have revealed the presence of children in the house near Cornelia, which belongs to the couple's relatives. The Phonesavanhs moved there with Bounkham and his three older sisters after their home in Wisconsin burned down. "They had been in this home for about two months," the lawyer, Mawuli Mel Davis, told WSB-TV, the ABC station in Atlanta. "This is a stay-at-home dad who was out in front of the home, playing with the children on a daily basis. Any surveillance that was done would have revealed there was a father with four children who played in that driveway."

Habersham County Sheriff's OfficeHabersham County Sheriff's OfficeBy Terrell's own account, the SWAT team was relying on the report of a confidential informant who briefly visited the home on Tuesday night, just a few hours before the raid, and bought methamphetamine from Wanis Thonetheva, the Phonesavanhs' nephew. "There was no clothes, no toys, nothing to indicate that there was children present in the home," Cornelia Police Chief Rick Darby claimed. "If there had been, then we'd have done something different." But Alecia Phonesavanh says anyone visiting the home should have noticed signs of children. "They say there were no toys," she told The Atlanta Journal-Constitution. "There is plenty of stuff. Their shoes were laying all over."

Bounkham, who was severely burned when the flash-bang grenade exploded in his face, is undergoing surgery today for the second time. His parents told the Journal-Constitution that doctors say he has a 50 percent chance of surviving. The Phonesavanhs, who have no health insurance, are collecting contributions to cover Bounkham's medical expenses.

Despite an avowed policy of not using flash-bang grenades when children are present, it seems that neither Terrell's office nor the Cornelia Police Department did anything to investigate that possibility aside from asking the informant, who according to Terrell did not even enter the home. Beyond the lack of due diligence on that point, there is the question of whether tossing an exploding, potentially incendiary device into a home that may be full of innocent people in the middle of the night is A-OK as long as you are reasonably sure all those people are 18 or older. And beyond that question, of course, is the issue of whether violence is ever a morally acceptable response to peaceful, consensual transactions between adults.

Terrell continues to blame those transactions for the horrible injuries police inflicted on a sleeping baby. "The information we had from our confidential informant was there was no children in the home," he told WXIA, the NBC station in Atlanta. "We always ask; that determines how we enter the house and the things we do.... Did we go by our training, did we go by the intelligence? Given the same set of circumstances, with the same information dealing with a subject who has known gun charges on him, who is selling meth, they would go through the same procedures...Nothing would change....Had no way of knowing the child was in the house. The little baby [who] was in there didn't deserve this. These drug dealers don't care."

Terrell, by contrast, cares so much about the psychoactive substances his neighbors consume that he is willing to endanger the lives of innocent bystanders in his vain attempt to stop people from getting high. If Terrell cared a little less, Bounkham would be home with his parents instead of clinging to life in a hospital.

Update: The Atlanta Journal-Constitution reports that doctors who wanted to repair the chest wound Bounkham suffered during the raid have delayed the surgery planned for today because of the boy's "worsening health." The family's lawyer says "his fevers have been spiking" and "he is not out of the woods yet." 

Update II: At a prayer vigil for Bounkham today, Marcus Coleman of the National Action Network said "the children [and] the father, on a daily basis, play out in the front yard at this residence." He added that in front of the door through which police entered was a minivan with four child seats and pictures of the children on the dashboard. "The sheriff gave a message saying that the one to blame for this incident is the individual that was selling narcotics," Coleman said. "What we come to tell him today is that the one to blame is you and your police department."

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  • Scruffy Nerfherder||

    Check your privilege title

  • Slammer||

    Shouldn't that read WHAT instead of why? We all know why.

  • Steve G||

    OT, but too derptastic to wait 3 hrs.

    Portland's tolerance is overrated. (because I can't get a job w/ facial tats/piercings)

    Surprising realness in the comments.

  • Plàya Manhattan.||

    When somebody doesn't explicitly state what their degrees are in, you can be pretty sure that they are bullshit.

    Also, fuck that guy.

  • Agammamon||

    At least back in New York, if they don't want to hire you, they simply wait until the interview is over and never call you again, allowing you to assume that someone more qualified was given the position.

    Yes, that *is* so much better - never hurt someone's precious feewings.

    Motherfucker 'ruthlessness is the kindness of the wise'.

  • Steve G||

    "ruthlessness...wise" -- that's fucking genius

  • Scruffy Nerfherder||

    Ha! The author was outderped.

    It is possible to lose white privilege. Facial piercings and tattoos are two ways to do that. When you thumb your nose at convention, be prepared to live without the support that the convention provides. Most folks want civil rights for conditions they have no control over, like race or gender. Facial piercings and tattoos are personal choices. You get to live with the consequences of your choices.

    Now, Mike Tyson has made facial tattoos work fore him. He has managed to learn from his choices and make some creative choices that are working for him. Perhaps Mike can be a role model for Rory. Mr. McEntyre apparently did not do a good job understanding what country he is living in and it's history. Portland is still part of the good old U.S.A., complete with its opportunities and prejudices.
  • mr simple||

    I wonder what his 2 degrees are.

  • Agammamon||

    'Scottish Literature' and 'Medieval History'.

  • VG Zaytsev||

    Confirmation Bias and
    Grievance Studies.

  • dannye||

    Scrolled down

    Gresham

    TLDR

  • Steve G||

    Hey, where I went to HS

  • Sudden||

    I moved here because I was lead to believe that the people of Portland, the people of Oregon, were not stuck in the 1800s

    Oh that is rich. They sure as hell all look like they're from the 1800s with mutton chops and whatnot.

  • EDG reppin' LBC||

  • BMFPitt||

    If his friends hadn't died of dysentery on the way there, they could have explained why he's an idiot before he did that to his face.

  • JW||

    Rory McEntyre poses with his wife

    Whatever they see in each other, thank god they don't see it in anyone else.

  • The Original Jason||

    I'd like to know why he has Thurisaz-Hagalaz-Uruz tattooed on his forehead… the first mention I see online of those three are this page:

    We are using Hagalaz together with Thurisaz and Uruz to bring about the total
    Destruction and Downfall of jewish government. Hagalaz and Thurisaz are both Runes of Destruction, Suffering and Pain while Uruz works to Destroy further and also represents freeing the Gentile People from the kike stranglehold.
  • Robert||

    Runes can be read many ways. One way is simply phonetically, in this case "thhu" or "dhu". Could be a monogram.

    Thurisaz also stands for Thor and his hammer, as well as for thunder. Thurisaz & hagalaz together are nearly redundant in that the hammer represented by thurisaz and the hail by hagalaz are both forceful breaking-thru symbols, and hail and thunder are nearly redundant.

    Uruz, however, meaning the aurochs, is a wild type of ox and represents the strength of the ox. Usually that strength is invoked as a kind of resistance rather than as a detructive force, although it's possible that the bull-in-a-china-shop meaning was intended.

    The runes are over his right eye, which connects to the right side of the brain only partly in neurologic terms, but more fully in symbolic terms, where the right brain is understood as artistic in its sensibility.

    It is also possible that the runes over an eyebrow like that are forming a picture.

  • Eggs Benedict Cumberbund||

    What the fuck are talking about? Runes are for Gandalf, hobbits, etc.

    I think an STFU is in order for knowing so much Rune Theory.

  • Plàya Manhattan.||

    So, is the police department going to settle the lawsuit to avoid revealing the identity of the confidential informant?

    I would really like to know a lot more about the informant they were using.

  • ||

    His name is Huggy Bear.

  • Plàya Manhattan.||

    You owe me a new laptop.

  • ||

    I'll get you a refurbished Chromebook, nothing more.

  • Swiss Servator, CH yeah!||

    That was the first time I have laughed today - thanks for that!

  • some guy||

    They already admitted that the informant visited the house "Tuesday night". He has probably already been identified on Twitter and Facebook.

  • Invisible Finger||

    "The information we had from our confidential informant was there was no children in the home,"

    Your CI is a moron and you believed him at face value. That makes you an even bigger idiot.

  • BMFPitt||

    I'm sure they never actually asked, so no point blaming the CI.

  • Michael Price||

    By their own testimony the CI didn't even claim to go in. How likely is it that someone who looked in the front door would see signs of children? High enough so that you can assume they didn't? I doubt it.

  • R C Dean||

    The Phonesavanhs, who have no health insurance, are collecting contributions to cover Bounkham's medical expenses.

    The fact that the county hasn't already stepped up and said they will pay the bills tells you all you need to know about what foul, soulless creatures inhabit the county government, from the Sheriff's Department all the way up.

  • mr simple||

    Well, it's not like it's their fault or anything. Those damn drug dealers made them do it!

  • VicRattlehead||

    still wondering, what drug dealers?
    was one arrested in this incident?
    were drugs found on the property at all?

  • Paul.||

    still wondering, what drug dealers?

    Alleged.

    was one arrested in this incident?

    No.

    were drugs found on the property at all?

    No, no drugs or weapons were recovered.

  • wagnert in atlanta||

    But Wanis Thonetheva, owner of the house and target of the raid, was arrested later that day in possession of approximately one ounce of methamphetamine.

  • Sudden||

    The Phonesavanhs, who have no health insurance, are collecting contributions to cover Bounkham's medical expenses.

    The sheriff was clearly just following the administration's diktats in enforcing a rigorous penaltax for not having insurance.

  • Agammamon||

    Its pretty obvious that their 'surveillance' consisted of the informant's report and the buy. No other surveillance was conducted.

    the SWAT team was relying on the report of a confidential informant who briefly visited the home on Tuesday night, just a few hours before the raid,

    Its pretty obvious that they moved as fast as possible and don't consider actual observation of the target part of their operational risk management work-up.

  • ||

    Observation might have revealed the informant as being an idiot, and then they wouldn't get to play soldier. Better to move quickly and burn children so that they get to dress up in their SWAT gear.

  • R C Dean||

    Had no way of knowing the child was in the house.

    Well, no way other than conducting the kind of surveillance that should be routine whenever you are going after a heavily armed meth dealer. Seriously, their justification for the raid makes their lack of surveillance totally incompetent and indefensible, purely on a tactical basis and without caring one whit about potential "collateral damage".

  • ||

    Nah...if they did surveillance then they might find the guy they were looking for drinking a beer on the front lawn and they would have had to simply walk up and arrest him.

    They have all this swat gear at the office. You want it to gather dust?

  • VicRattlehead||

    not only that but if the suspicion is Meth, who in their right mind would toss an incendiary grenade (the word grown ups use for your particular choice of "distraction device") into it....isn't meth kinda volatile?
    yes a flashbang is an incendiary grenade willy-Pete is very flammable and known to cause 3rd degree burns as it reaches temperatures hot enough to flash melt steel.

  • Agammamon||

    Well, meth *production* facilities can be volatile - depending on *how* the stuff is being cooked.

    Meth itself isn't.

    If all the guy was doing there was *selling* (getting his supply from someone else) then its safe enough.

    Of course - if you didn't do enough recon to definitively rule out the presence of children then you didn't do enough recon to rule out the presence of a leaky bottle of ether.

  • ||

    the presence of a leaky bottle of ether.

    Or propane, gasoline, varnish, cotton batting, nylon, urethane, ethanol or pretty much any of 100 other innocuous substances that most of us regularly keep in our homes that isn't meant to have an incendiary device tossed into it.

  • gaoxiaen||

    Yep. No wood in this house.

  • politicsbyothermeans||

    While I agree that it's a bad idea to throw a flashbang into a place you haven't reconned and could, I suppose, conceivably have meth cooking ongoing, they do not contain white phosphorous.

    And, yes, they can start fires but that is very very unusual and they are not incendiary devices in any real sense.

    I've had them go off in my lap, beside my head, on carpet and on furniture I was sitting on. There were no fires and nothing worse than a sunburn level burn.

    Of course, none of that excuses the craven assholes that did this. There's still no point in claiming that the grenade body contains "willy-Pete" when they most assuredly do not.

  • wagnert in atlanta||

    How would you do surveillance on an isolated house in a rural area without tipping off the target?

  • DenverJay||

    Right, because no surveillance has ever been done on anyone who wasn't in a city. I can think of a dozen ways without even trying hard. People like you who excuse these thugs are part of the problem. You might as well have burned that baby yourself.

  • Dread Pirate Roberts||

    So in the Land of the Free, cowboy cops can bust into your home with weapons blazing based on information from a junkie snitch. Good to know.

  • JD the elder||

    They can do it to us, yet if we tossed a flash grenade into a police station, somehow I don't think they would be so cool with it.

    tossing an exploding, potentially incendiary device into a home that may be full of innocent people in the middle of the night is A-OK as long as you are reasonably sure all those people are 18 or older.

    This was also my thought. When the sheriff says, "Gee, we'd never do this if we thought there was a child in the house", what he's implicitly saying is "Everyone else can get their face burned off, though." I mean, there could be a disabled adult in the house, or just somebody who was asleep when a grenade landed on them.

  • wagnert in atlanta||

    The door they tossed the flash-bang grenade through was to the garage. It was also the door that Thonetheva used when he sold the informant meth. The police had no way of knowing the garage had been converted into a bedroom for the Phonesavanhs.

  • DenverJay||

    Bullshit. Why would you toss a "distraction device" into a part of the house that you thought didn't have people in it? Who were they trying to distract? And, of course, there is no garage in America that is full of inflammable chemicals like gasoline, paint thinner, stains and paint, etc.
    It was an incredibly reckless act by a bunch of punks who wanted to play SWAT. Everyone involved should be prosecuted for reckless endangerment, whatever the charge is that includes "under color of authority", and if that poor baby dies, then they should be charged with manslaughter at the least. I believe manslaughter, in most states, is defined along the lines of death caused by "actions that could be reasonably expected to cause death or injury".

  • newshutz||

    Doesn't reckless disregard for human life push that up to murder two?

  • The Original Jason||

    Now we need to find a junkie snitch to claim drugs are in the house of Joey Terrell… and he's heavily armed.

  • Ken Shultz||

    "Bounkham, who was severely burned when the flash-bang grenade exploded in his face, is undergoing surgery today for the second time. His parents told the Journal-Constitution that doctors say he has a 50 percent chance of surviving."

    Then there's a 50 percent chance that someone should be charged with negligent homicide.

  • ||

    Then there's a 50 percent chance that someone should be charged with negligent homicide no less than negligent homicide.

    Imagine if a civilian tossed an incendiary device into a home and burned someone half to death...

    Trespass, assault, arson, possession/use of a hoax device...

  • waffles||

    I rewatched Season 3 of The Wire and it's amazing how much more sympathetic the cops are in fiction than in the real world. How the show would handle this situation would be quite different.

  • R C Dean||

    The fact that the CI told them he made a buy in the house but didn't noticed that a toddler had been living there for two months makes me think he was never in the house at all, and thus probably his reported buy never happened.

  • sarcasmic||

    You are assuming that the police are telling the truth when they claim to have asked if there were signs of children.

    That's a big assumption.

  • 110 Lean||

    He's also assuming that the CI actually ever really existed.

  • Invisible Finger||

    His name was Fuzzy Dunlop.

  • VicRattlehead||

    the CI was Tulpa

  • politicsbyothermeans||

    Heh.

  • Plàya Manhattan.||

    That was my thought too. And, as already stated above, the CI was probably a junkie too. These guys wanted to dress up and play G.I. Joe so badly that they would believe anything.

  • Scruffy Nerfherder||

    The Ryan Frederick case involved an informant that was a known burglar who passed along info on the houses he broke into. The cops were fully aware of the informant's activities.

  • DEG||

    Remember the informant in the Corey Maye case was a known and open racist.

  • JW||

    "Were there any children present in the home?"

    "Huh? What? Um....no, man. Can I get my check now?"

    "SADDLE UP PEOPLE! LOCK AND LOAD!"

  • The Original Jason||

    Not checks… cash.

    CIs are paid in cash.

  • wagnert in atlanta||

    You are assuming the informant was ever in the house. It seems much more likely that Thonetheva sold him the meth at the garage door and never allowed him to see into the house.

  • some guy||

    No hat-tip for the "Putting children first" banner? Curses, I thought I had a good shot at that one...

  • Plàya Manhattan.||

    Hat tip to "some guy"? I like the sound of that.

  • some guy||

    Serious journalism requires serious sources. We have neither.

  • Sudden||

    We do have a serious man

  • GamerFromJump||

    Putting children first - We'll kill everyone else later.

  • sarcasmic||

    If the kid dies, I wonder who the cops will charge with a crime. The parents? The dealer?

    Certainly not the actual killer.

  • some guy||

    Depends on how upset the community gets. If tossing a flashbang at an infant's head doesn't turn that town against it's LEOs, nothing will. But there's always a chance, right?

  • The Original Jason||

    Cornelia's about 5 miles from Alto State Prison… big employer in Cornelia.

  • Agammamon||

    Their already talking about charging the guy on the warrant (who they picked up several hours later, at a different location, *without* having to raid another home) with the kid's injuries.

    Sounds to me like the prosecutor is taking the Felony Murder thing further than he's allowed to.

    Of course, its probably just them talking out their arses to look tough.

  • ||

    The cops and prosecutors have been trying for a while now to blame-shift any responsibility the police have for their actions onto suspects. They would love, love, love to be able to throw all fuck-ups onto the person they were supposedly taking action against. They would have even less accountability than they already do, and that would suit them just fine.

  • sarcasmic||

    Trying? Dude, they do it all the time. Remember recently cops opened fire on some dude in Time Square for failure to obey, hitting several bystanders? They charged dude for the damage caused by their callous recklessness. I'm not going to bother googling up a link, but it's true.

  • Dances-with-Trolls||

    Yeah, but in this case the individual in question wasn't even there. That's a whole new dynamic. You want to talk about perverse incentives? How about cops maximizing the damage because they know that the responsibility for anything they do will be transferred to their target after the fact? It's completely sick in a way that our currently sick system could only dream of.

  • Marshall Gill||

    Hell, here in OKC a couple of years ago a LEO died in a car accident while in pursuit of a dude on a stolen motorcycle. They pressed first degree murder charges as a result.

  • The Late P Brooks||

    Why does anybody pretend they gave a shit whether there were children in the house?

    "We deeply regret the publicity generated by this unfortunate incident. In the future we will do our utmost to prevent information like this from reaching the public."

  • Brendan||

    Either they did it on purpose or they have pretty awful intel.

    What would have happened if that room had housed a functioning meth lab or been used to store the volatile chemicals for one?

    They relied on the intel of a CI who supposedly had been there in the hours before. We hear this a lot when things go bad, yet police departments still push the line that no-knock raids are only done after exhaustive/extensive surveillance that tells them they have no choice but to go that route.

    I guess this falls under police procedure Section F, subsection Y, paragraph T, subparagraph W.

  • sarcasmic||

    When there is a possibility that the person they are after might be dangerous, they wait the person to go check the mail or otherwise lure them out of their house because a raid might jeopardize officer safety.

    They only rush in paramilitary style when they're confident that there are no threats to their safety.

  • VicRattlehead||

    I wonder if they checked to see if the home had natural gas lines either, both could have lit the building up like the 4th

  • ||

    What would have happened if that room had housed a functioning meth lab or been used to store the volatile chemicals for one?

    Or the family was repainting or an occupant was a hobbyist wood worker or fancy seamstress? Or the kids were 'camping in' in nylon sleeping bags?

    Flashbangs are only modestly safer than tossing in a lit torch. I don't exactly know how many shelves/floors/carpets in my house wouldn't catastrophically catch fire with a modest dose of perchlorate.

  • Brendan||

    I'm sure we'll get a "SWAT team incinerates 5th grade slumber/camping party with flashbang, Chief defends officers" headline in the next year or so.

  • gaoxiaen||

    Our CI said one of the kids had beer.

  • waffles||

    Did we go by our training, did we go by the intelligence?

    Do they really have either?

  • Hugh Akston||

    Beyond the lack of due diligence on that point, there is the question of whether tossing an exploding, potentially incendiary device into a home that may be full of innocent people in the middle of the night is A-OK as long as you are reasonably sure all those people are 18 or older.

    If they were so innocent, then what were the police doing there, huh smart guy?

  • DFG||

    The CI didn't give a rat's ass that there was a baby in the house. He works on commission and likely only gets paid by the number of people he gets arrested. The police didn't care either because they got to put on their SWAT costumes and go kick some doors. They could have waited until the alleged dealer went to the store and grabbed him then, but what fun would that have been?

  • BilboTeabaggins||

    It is so petty and revealing that the sherriff/mayor/city council can't bring themselves to apologize profusely for this. Whether or not you agree with aggressive enforcement of drug laws or even their existence, this is a major fuck-up.

    I would have court-martialed one of my soldiers if they flash banged a kid in Afghanistan. And nothing will happen to these clowns.

  • JW||

    Almost sociopathic, don't you think?

    He's just taking his cues from the president.

  • Marshall Gill||

    What do you mean, almost?

  • ||

    all cops are pieces of shit...

    all cops that have not proved that yet, just have not proved that yet.

    Up here in Alaska some dumb pig put up a facebook note:

    "don't like cops call a crackhead"

    I don't know of many crackheads burning babies faces off and not giving a shit.

    Also, crackheads are not getting 6 figure salaries with paid vacations for killing the public.

  • VicRattlehead||

    Agreed this shit would have never flown in Afg. shit we returned fire at a farmer once who shot at us first and still got court martialed because there "was no good indication the "Non-combatant" was firing at the unit" as if there were some other reason to be blindly firing at our patrol.

  • Invisible Finger||

    At this point, the police and military might as well swap roles. Government is so FUBAR nothing can save it.

  • wagnert in atlanta||

    They have repeatedly apologized.

  • DenverJay||

    Oh, well, then, it's all OK now. Forget about violating civil rights and maiming and possibly murdering a baby. As long as they say they're sorry, it's all good.

  • politicsbyothermeans||

    Is your browser redirecting from PoliceOne to reason?

  • Fist of Etiquette||

    "If there's children involved in a house, we do not use any kind of distraction devices in those houses," Terrell told AccessNorthGa.com.

    If it turns out there were children involved in a house, we say we wouldn't have used incendiary devices.

  • B.P.||

    "There is plenty of stuff. Their shoes were laying all over."

    Unkempt household not suitable for children! Child Protective Services, take them away at once!

  • Trials and Trippelations||

    If the family didn't want this to happen they should've put those family member decals on the back of their car. You can't expect my heroic deputies to investigate any deeper than that.

    /Terrel

  • JW||

    Did we go by our training, did we go by the intelligence?

    0 for 2. 0 for 3 if you count his intelligence.

  • R C Dean||

    Now, JW. I think they did go by his intelligence. Isn't this about what you would expect, after all, given who we are apparently dealing with here?

  • JW||

    It's on his card:

    Sheriff Joey Terrell

    GENIUS

  • Andrew S.||

    At least Wile E. Coyote could blame defective ACME products for his failures.

    This fucker Terrell, on the other hand...

  • VicRattlehead||

    Defective government is his problem, defective training, defective laws, defective procedures, defective ideology.
    American government brought to you by the ACME corp.

  • Phlogistan||

    From previous articles Sheriff Joey Terril asked for prayers because some of the officers were "fathers" and very stressed out...

    I'm worried for the children of these armed grenade throwing Fathers.

    Obviously there has been "weapons" violations committed by these fathers. And they have a documented history of using explosive's against children.

    Isn't there some sort of Government Agency with approved procedure's in place could intervene in this situation? Before Tradgedy strikes again? Maybe the Department of Education's SWAT team?

    You know.. For The Children...

  • ||

    From previous articles Sheriff Joey Terril asked for prayers because some of the officers were "fathers" and very stressed out...

    I'm sure many of them are so distraught that they'll resign their positions. Those only slightly less distraught will publicly sign on to the NAP, and refrain from using their weapons until fired upon and from using flashbangs ever again.

    Then, after we imagine all those officers stepping forward, the actual officers will probably take a paid leave or just continue shooting dogs until they burn the next baby.

  • Dances-with-Trolls||

    The little baby [who] was in there didn't deserve this. These drug dealers don't care."

    I'm sure that they will be releasing the name of the drug dealer who threw the incendiary device into the house any moment now.

  • Loki||

    Why Did Baby-Burning Drug Warriors Think There Were No Children in the Home They Attacked?

    They didn't think at all. That's not what they're paid for. They're paid to make sure they make it home safe at night. For the CHILDRENZ!!11!!!

  • Brian||

    God, I hate them so much.

    That is all.

  • Kure'i||

    Listening to an interview with this fat fuck in the Sheriff's uniform confirms every hick cop stereotype:

    Bad Grammar -- Check (Consistent conjugation fail.)
    Fat and Moustached -- Check
    Drug Myths Repeated -- Check.
    Cop jargon -- Check.
    Inappropriate laughter -- Check.

    I'm just glad he had his pastor counsel the cops involved, because though sometimes bad things happen to good people, they didn't deserve this to happen to them.

    Remember: It's not just the baby who's the victim here. It's the cops, too. They're hero-victims.

  • VicRattlehead||

    they killed their pastor in 2009
    thats why he asked us to pray for him
    you cant make this shit up

  • Invisible Finger||

    Yep. Pretty much an episode of Squidbillies.

  • toolkien||

    With all the stories on this case I may have missed it, but wouldn't the first sign that a child MIGHT be in the house be the pack-n-play? Pro-LEO people are saying that the pack-n-play was up against the door and it was being used as a "human shield". OK. But then wouldn't THAT be a clue to use some other tactic because there might be a child actually in the house, if not IN the pack-n-play itself? And yet John Q Law STILL tossed the device? I just don't see where there's any place to hide on this. Just a bunch of Barneys, Gomers, and Goobers playing Cops. And all for a little bit of meth. Obviously they knew it wasn't a factory or they wouldn't have tossed devices at all. So a low level distribution of meth and we get SWAT descending like locusts to play tough guy and likely seize property. And all it costs was a toddler's face.

  • Kure'i||

    Doesn't it also seem a bit odd that they couldn't even bother to make sure the guy was there before they raided? If they can spare the money to roll out Delta Force on this house, it seems like they could at least post a single cop there for a couple hours to let them know if the suspect is home in the first place.

    But that might imply they had some duty of care towards the public, which they obviously do not.

  • adifferentken||

    Despite the fact that throwing a flash bang into a structure suspected of housing a meth lab is not very bright, it has happened:

    http://www.weeklystandard.com/keyword/Radley-Balko

    They injured a child that time, too.

  • Andrew S.||

    I've got a question for the fine ladies and gentlemen of Reason:

    What do you do with the anger created by these types of stories?

    I feel impotent with a lot of this stuff. Can't think of anything to change it, so I have to sit and continue to get enraged. I'd punch a wall, but I'm not sure my boss would approve.

  • BilboTeabaggins||

    Nothing to do. We are past the point of no return. If it isn't the drug war it will be something else.

  • BuSab Agent||

    I stab my voodoo dolls.

  • R C Dean||

    I pack it down, waiting for the day when it can be fully and appropriately expressed.

  • Rob||

    I pack it down, waiting for the day when it can be fully and appropriately expressed.

    This, but I don't know how much more I can stomach. All I can do is wait to catch the preference cascade wave when it finally arrives.

  • toolkien||

    Just try and remember things like this and when the opportunity arises to talk about public policy relating to drugs - with friends, family, etc - try and to pull the rug out from under the War on Drugs. It's about all we can do, within this area of Statist policy.

  • VicRattlehead||

    post furious comments wishing for Libertopia to rise into being so we finally have a free country to live in.

    pray for others to see this and have it engender distrust and hatred towards the state.

    and finally beef up the home so if they try this shit it falls into my grenade catch that will roll it back out under the window to safely return it to the thugs attempting to invade my home and do violence upon my family so they can burn out their retinas from prematurely engaging their night vision cuz the goggles look so coool!!!!111OMGGGG!!

  • NL_||

    Channel it into something unrelated, like career, personal goals, or altruism. I can't or don't do much to help victims of police abuse, but I do like to help poor people file their taxes to collect EITC.

    I think of VITA as doing my little bit to drain the Treasury of funds while also giving low-income people a little better go of it. It's also the least annoying welfare program, in that a refund check doesn't have all the social engineering rules of SNAP, WIC, EBT, or whatever else.

    I sublimate my rage at police abuse into a more generalized hatred of how government is a way for bullies to hurt people, which allows me to feel slightly useful when I do other things to reduce the government's revenue.

  • Ted S.||

    I post the stories on fora full of cop fellators. They think I'm a freak.

    I think I've actually posted the Youtube of one of the raids where the popo killed a dog.

  • Invisible Finger||

    I take it out on my co-workers.

  • dannye||

    I vent by taking part in shooting competitions at my club and thrashing the SWAT cops.

  • Marty Feldman's Eyes||

  • Kure'i||

    I usually go read the comments on the same story on another site, and get even angrier listening to the copsuckers blaming anyone but the cop.

    E.g., http://www.cnn.com/2014/05/30/.....1416458744

    For work, I do criminal defense, and sometimes have the pleasure of getting one of these morons on the stand. And at least that can be fun, even if ultimately worthless, because the judges are part of the same "justice" system as the cops, and generally will excuse anything but the most egregious conduct.

  • NL_||

    Procedures and checklists don't make a venture succeed, they just avoid certain known ways for a venture to fail. The fact that they apparently followed their procedures might just as well be rephrased as saying their procedures have a cavalier attitude towards the occupants of the buildings they assault and invade.

  • TexasRasta||

    So were there drugs in the house?

  • Invisible Finger||

    Is Infamil a drug?

  • Free Society||

    Despite an avowed policy of not using flash-bang grenades when children are present, it seems that neither Terrell's office nor the Cornelia Police Department did anything to investigate that possibility aside from asking the informant, who obviously was wrong.

    No flash bangs only if there is a child present. But god help you if you're over the age of 18, then we can burn your face off with even more impunity than when we do it to a child.

    Given the same set of circumstances, with the same information dealing with a subject who has known gun charges on him, who is selling meth, they would go through the same procedures...Nothing would change....Had no way of knowing the child was in the house. The little baby [who] was in there didn't deserve this. These drug dealers don't care."

    These coercion peddling government thugs don't care. The Sherriff, his SWAT team and every public official within a 5 miles radius should be hung by their entrails until death finds them.

    And furthermore, the government should be destroyed.

  • ian6552||

    Start working from home with Google. I make money in my ѕpаr℮ tim℮! I have been unemployed fоr months but nοw i mаĸ℮ up to $100/day on the computer. pop over to this website www.Fox81.com

  • sasob||

    The sheriff wants our prayers? Here's one for him:

    If there is a God, may He damn you, your deputies, and the rest of the Nazi stormtrooper terrorists for what you have done and are doing to this country. Amen.

  • MSimon||

    Amen.

  • Big Boy||

    "Confidential" informant. That means a real criminal who has been caught red-handed and who has agreed to provide "good" tips in return for escaping the punishment for his crime.

    99% of them are lying sacks of s**t. Whether they do it for money or for a "get out of jail" card, they have an incentive to LIE and no incentive to tell the truth about anything. They are like drug dogs who alert when the handler pats his left thigh. Unlike the dog, they can think. That makes them doubly dangerous because they can make up stuff whenever they please.

    They need to have a few good cases but you would be surprised how long they are allowed to go with no production. The system stinks because the police also have no incentive to make it work.

  • DenverJay||

    I'm going to be sick.

  • 0844/8531/19D/42A||

    My 1st tour in Iraq (04-05) we did plenty of door kicking, not once did my platoon (or any platoon in my brigade for that matter) use flash bangs due to safety concerns and counter-insurgency doctrine....and that was is in a WAR ZONE!!! Gotta love police these days

  • AlbedoAtoned||

    They keep trying to shrug off the blame for their actions.

    "We didn't know there was a child."

    "The informant said there wasn't a child."

    "There were no signs of a child."

    But the worst excuse they gave was:

    "It was the drug dealer's fault."

    No. It wasn't. They didn't use a weapon against a child. Even if there wasn't a child there, the use of said weapon was unnecessary, an overreaction, and probably not even cost effective.

    You wanted to play SWAT. Own up to it, you fucked up. And to the citizens in the area, these men should be incarcerated, and off the streets. If this passes as okay policing, then you too are responsible for this child's endangerment and possible death. If he dies, it is more blood on the police's hands. You did this police, not drug dealers.

  • PaulBot1776||

    It seems to me that police and drug policy are more dangerous than radical islam and terrorists.

  • OzarkAggie||

    99% of these SWAT raids are totally without justification. The courts have supported their use because we continue to elevate "former" prosecutors to the bench, and of course the War on Drugs.

  • Deckard||

    Dear Reason,

    I have always had a deep suspicion of those in authority, and have always been very wary of police.

    Then, I found your site. Then I read Radly Balko's new book.

    What kind of country do we live in where police can burn and possibly kill a baby, and the population as a whole doesn't seem to really give a fuck?

    What kind of country sees events like this happen literally al the time, and yet it is hardly ever mentioned in the national news?

    WE ARE FUCKED.

    I don't think there is anything that they can do that will generate enough public outrage to create any change.

    BTW, has anyone read the comments on police one?

    Fucking Animals.

    http://www.policeone.com/offic.....s-in-crib/

  • DenverJay||

    Welcome to the resistance! Vive la révolution!

  • Kure'i||

    Comments like the ones on Police One are very common, it seems, from checking out the comments on various sites with the story. No matter what the cops do, there are legions of dopes supporting their authoritah.

  • erikemiller@me.com||

    Terrell looks like the perfect Aryan. He likes burning those brown people. Makes him feel good.

  • ||

    Phone Directory

    Habersham County Sheriff’s Office 706-839-0500
    Sheriff Joey Terrell 706-839-0509
    Chief Deputy Greg Bowen 706-839-0508
    Criminal Investigation Division 706-839-1724
    Sgt. Richard Stein 706-839-0556
    Lt. Mike Free 706-8390555
    Habersham County 706-839-0200
    Coroner 706-778-6140
    Chief Magistrate 706-839-0350
    Clerk of Superior Court 706-839-0300
    Commissioners 706-839-0200
    County Manager 706-839-0200
    District Attorney 706-839-0370
    Emergency 911 Dispatch 706-778-3911
    Emergency 911 Mapping 706-754-1735
    Emergency Management 706-778-9500
    Family & Children Services 706-754-2148
    Fire Department 706-754-2822
    Probate Court 706-839-0320
    Probate Court 706-839-0320
    Sheriff’s Department 706-839-0500
    Solicitor General 706-778-0800
    State Court 706-754-0834
    Superior Court 706-839-0335

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