Brickbat: Transparency in Police Work

Huron County, Ohio, sheriff's deputies forced their way into the home of John Collins, threw him to the ground and handcuffed him. They forced him to lie there face down while they tore his home apart. Collins says they finally they figured out they were in the wrong place. They were supposed to be searching another unit in the triplex that Collins lives in. When a local paper started asking questions about the raid, a judge sealed the search warrant. In fact, the judge also sealed the order sealing the search warrant, and the sheriff is refusing to release the initial complaint that led to the raid.

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  • Fist of Etiquette||

    When a local paper started asking questions about the raid, a judge sealed the search warrant. In fact, the judge also sealed the order sealing the search warrant, and the sheriff is refusing to release the initial complaint that led to the raid.

    Smooth.

  • Swiss Servator, Versicherung!||

    How long until the sheriff's refusal to release the initial complaint is sealed?

    I guess when the local taxpayers are put on the hook in the lawsuit, at least Collins will see what was going on in discovery. I am sure there will be a gag order, however, on the whole process.

  • Steve G||

    How long until 24/7 is sealed. oh wait..

  • Ted S.||

    You say that as though it were a bad thing.

  • ||

    Who is worthy to open the book, and to loose the seals thereof?

  • UnCivilServant||

    Only the unworthy is worthy.

  • LiveFreeOrDiet||

    Unauthorized personnel only?

  • UnCivilServant||

    Only way to make sure it's not misused.

  • Ted S.||

    This is the sort of shit that Wikileaks is needed for.

  • db||

    Classified in the interests of County Security.

  • SweatingGin||

    Isn't that actually Huron County, Ohio? just south of Sandusky, and written about in the Sandusky paper?

  • db||

    Yeah, not sure where they got Michigan out of that.

  • UnCivilServant||

    Detroit has metastatsized and pieces of michigan have been spotted in nearby states. This cancer may be difficult to treat.

  • Almanian!||

    Michigan decided to "get tough" and "take back Toledo".

    It was all over before everyone sobered up and realized what happened.

    true story

  • DH||

    "Transparency in police work."

    We've already got clear plastic riot shields, what more do you plebes want?

    /Sheriff

  • ||

    “Then they just left like it was nothing” Collins said.

    Well, to them it was

  • Ted S.||

    The officers got home safely, didn't they?

  • db||

    They probably got extra "hazard" pay for it.

  • Ted S.||

    If the editor has balls, every single report from the HCSO in future will mention this incident and that because of it, nothing the HCSO say can be trusted.

    Or just stop publishing arrest records. These people have only been arrested, not found guilty of anything yet.

  • db||

    The first would be a great reaction. There is, as we all know, a symbiotic relationship between police and reporters that will prevent it. What do you call it when a symbiotic relationships between A and B forms a single parasite on C (the public)?

  • Almanian!||

    What do you call it when a symbiotic relationships between A and B forms a single parasite on C (the public)?

    "The status quo"

  • Ted S.||

    Oh, and nice alt-text.

  • Steve G||

    If it tweren't for your comment, I would have missed it. that was good

  • Almanian!||

    +1 sammich

  • db||

    You have to love this part:

    The Register learned the search warrant was gagged after Huron County Sheriff’s Capt. Ted Patrick failed to deliver on assurances he made Thursday, when he said he would follow up on the Register’s requests for the initial complaints that led to the search warrant.

    Incident reports and search warrants are generally public record that cannot be withheld from release.

    “You send me a records request via email and I’ll be happy to get what you need,” Patrick said Thursday.

    Patrick did not respond to the email the Register then sent and, when a reporter went to the sheriff’s office Friday, the incident reports weren’t available.

    Patrick, who for the past three years has routinely failed to follow the public records requirements of the Ohio Revised Code, was also unavailable.

    Earlier this month, Sheriff Dane Howard agreed to have his command staff begin complying with state law. When the Register emailed requests for incident reports on four other occasions in the past few weeks, the Huron County Sheriff’s Office provided those reports the following day — the first ever such consistent occurrences in the past three years.
  • Almanian!||

    Earlier this month, Sheriff Dane Howard agreed to have his command staff begin complying with state law.

    Well - that's mighty white of him

  • John||

    The man is having to comply with the law (some of the time) like he was an ordinary person or something. Hasn't he suffered enough?

  • ||

    Earlier this month, Sheriff Dane Howard agreed to have his command staff begin complying with state law.

    Well that's mighty big of him

  • Scruffy Nerfherder||

    It's shit like this that makes me support arsonists.

  • John||

    You shouldn't laugh at people's appearances. My God does that guy look the part of corrupt, nasty local sheriff or what? Some of these people are right out of central casting.

  • R C Dean||

    Its frickin' Boss Hog in real life.

  • Rich||

    When a local paper started asking questions about the raid, a judge sealed the search warrant. In fact, the judge also sealed the order sealing the search warrant, and the sheriff is refusing to release the initial complaint that led to the raid.

    The People should simply, um, "seal" the houses of the judge and the sheriff.

  • John C. Randolph||

    This is the kind of shit that happens when you let cops wear black shirts.

    -jcr

  • RishJoMo||

    Sounds like some prett yserious business dude.

    www.GotsDatAnon.tk

  • Agile Cyborg||

    The sheriff is the typically answerable only to the governor of state if my interpretation of Ohio law is correct (which I believe it is). We say sheriffs answer to voters but, well... that's all belly chuckle since it is inconceivable to me that anywhere in this country will voters demand that sheriffs actually toe ethical lines (aside from quite rare circumstances).

    Another shade to this is the fact that under Ohio law that the sheriff is not responsible for the activities of his deputies unless it can be proven the sheriff was indeed actively involved in illegal activity. Here again if you have an over-zealous sheriff with an IQ of 91 with thuggish deputies we are talking about the perfect storm of unethical policing since it is rare that department-level corruption results in being properly investigated.

    The reality here is that the governmental process of law enforcement has been cleverly designed to create a very powerful position with practically zero oversight. Since when do state pretty boys and girls called governors ever question, analyze, or punish the misdeeds of their county sheriffs?

  • Agile Cyborg||

    Adding another nasty elbow into the mix is the good old boy networks of mayors, commissioners, and judges who often work together to create opaque legal environments that protect buddies and connections.

    I don't believe for a second this is ethical or promotes liberty and a peaceful society. The system is rigged and fosters corruption.

    The only way to change this is to introduce something like a state-based CBI, the Citizens Bureau of Investigation. An investigative arm that strictly deals with literally policing law enforcement activities.

  • Mensan||

    We say sheriffs answer to voters but, well... that's all belly chuckle since it is inconceivable to me that anywhere in this country will voters demand that sheriffs actually toe ethical lines [tow ethical lions] (aside from quite rare circumstances).

    FTFY

  • Mainer2||

    This guy doesn't look like much of a sheriff. One badge and some service ribbons (just like a real sojer !).

    Where are the stars, the hat with scrambled eggs, the gold braid ?

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