Afghanistan

Rep. Peter Meijer Is 'Furious' at the White House's Afghanistan 'Lies'

In an interview, the Michigan Republican explains what he learned in Kabul, why Tucker Carlson is wrong about Afghan refugees, and how the 20-year occupation was an "abject failure."

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Because "the information we were getting from the administration was outdated, it was inaccurate, and sometimes just plain deceptive," freshman Rep. Peter Meijer (R–Mich.) and four-term Rep. Seth Moulton (D–Mass.) made an unannounced trip to Afghanistan on August 24.

The congressional duo—both of them Iraq War vets, both of them intervention skeptics—were promptly criticized for recklessness by the White House, the congressional leadership and the Pentagon. Meijer was defiant about the importance of what he learned there: "We were being lied to up and down."

On Wednesday morning, hours after President Joe Biden's speech marking the end of the 20-year U.S. military involvement in Afghanistan, Meijer was still describing himself as "very angry at everybody"—about the hundreds of Americans and visa-qualified Afghans left behind, about the two decades of failed leadership and congressional abdication that led up to this, and about the administration's brazen dishonesty.

"If you want to talk to specific lies," the 33-year-old Meijer told me over the phone, "one: that there is no more Al Qaeda in Afghanistan. That's a lie; we know it. Two: them saying that the Haqqani network and the Taliban are two separate entities. That's a lie. Three: that Americans were not 'stranded'—Jen Psaki, that was a lie. Four: that Americans were not being beaten by the Taliban or being harassed trying to get into the airport. That was a lie. Boy, there's a bunch of others too."

Meijer, who holds the Grand Rapids congressional seat previously represented by Libertarian Justin Amash, first jumped into politics in 2019 out of concern that Amash, still then a Republican, was spending too much time bashing Donald Trump. In his first month on the job, Meijer himself faced intense criticism and a GOP primary challenger for witheringly criticizing Trump and then voting to impeach him for his role in stoking the Capitol riot.

Though the two men diverge philosophically, they share an independent streak, a desire to "end the endless wars," and a certain generational facility with social media. After the State Department left stranded dozens of employees of the U.S. Agency for Global Media, which funds Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty and Voice of America, one of a group of 15 such journalists got out of Afghanistan at the last minute only by sliding into Meijer's DMs.

"They're now resettled in a safe country," Meijer said. "But it's just astounding how out of touch or unaware or oblivious this administration has been. It's just been every step of the process."

Now making the media rounds, Meijer is calling for Congress to buff up its foreign policy responsibilities and repeal open-ended Authorizations for the Use of Military Force (AUMFs). He is also calling for the resignations of officials who botched the U.S. retreat.

"There are a lot of things that I cannot wait to share until we are a little bit past this point—because there are situations with folks who are still trying to get out—that are just jaw-dropping for the organizational failures," he said.

The following is an edited transcript of our conversation. "It's delusional," Meijer contends, "to call what has happened over the past two decades, and as we saw encapsulated over the past two weeks, as anything but an abject failure."

Reason: What was your impression of President Biden's speech?

Peter Meijer: What my fear has been for a while is that there will be these victory laps and attempts to make this a Mission Accomplished moment. Without a doubt, the men and women of our armed services and our diplomatic personnel on the ground have done incredible work. But I'm a lot less focused on the people we were able to get out than on those we left behind, and I think that's where our focus needs to continue to be, no matter how much the president would like to put this in the rearview and focus on his domestic agenda.

Reason: Tell us a little bit, given your knowledge and your ongoing work on this, about who is left behind. Who are these people, what is your sense of their danger, and how many of them are there?

Meijer: We have several hundred Americans. And again, for each of these American citizens, they in many cases have non-U.S.-citizen family members. So it's those American citizens who were left behind and their family members. And then it's also a staggering number—thousands upon tens of thousands of individuals who either have Special Immigrant Visas, have applied for them and are close in the pipeline, or are otherwise eligible for those Special Immigrant Visas who are currently being hunted by the Taliban.

We've seen plenty of incidents of reprisal killings, and I don't know that I've spoken to somebody who hasn't said, "The Taliban have come to my house, have asked my family where I am." Or they came to their house and the house was empty because they're in hiding, and asked the neighbors where these people are. So I think there's a very real and palpable fear that the Taliban will not respect the general amnesty that they put out, but are instead interested in retribution. I hope that that's not the case, but I think it is very wise and prudent to assume any worst-case scenario here.

Reason: I know that you are in favor of withdrawing from the war, and you've been a critic of some of our ongoing missions out there. The president last night said, "I was not going to extend this forever war, and I was not extending a forever exit." What if anything is wrong with that approach?

Meijer: One thing I want to make very clear, one of the reasons why I was optimistic and supportive of the withdrawal, was because of the work that was being done in Doha to negotiate towards a power-sharing agreement and a unity government that was likely going to be more decentralized, that would allow a bit more provincial autonomy.

In order to negotiate, you need to have leverage, and the two points of leverage we had, one, was our physical presence on the ground, and number two was the existence of the Afghan government and the Afghan National Security Forces. So while I am sympathetic at the notion that we don't want to be engaged in the forever war and we don't want to be engaged in a forever exit, the reality is that we were moving towards this negotiated power-sharing agreement, and then frankly stumbled on the one yard line. We failed to adjust our withdrawal, adjust the conditions as the security situation eroded, as the Afghan National Security Forces and Afghan government's credibility and durability eroded. We just made the mad rush for the exits.

So we should not have had as mad a rush to the exits without any adjustments, without any accounting for the situation as it was collapsing. Because once that snowball starts to pick up steam, you wind up with tens of thousands of people overrunning the runways. You wind up with crushes at these gates that exposed our Marine soldiers and sailors to mortal peril, and for which 13 of whom lost their lives.

This is not an indictment on the idea of withdrawing, but on the way in which we so recklessly, and against all reports coming out of the ground, stuck to an untenable approach.

Reason: You worked in intelligence in Iraq. This rapid collapse in Afghanistan has been seen by outside critics as a massive intelligence failure. What is your assessment?

Meijer: I think it's right to call it an intelligence failure. Now, the intelligence community says that it was not a failure of collection, that they had the information, they tried to pass it on; it was not a failure of assessment, they analyzed what they collected and they provided that. But whether it's a failure of collection, assessment, dissemination, or absorption, the reality is that our national security apparatus was taken by surprise, and they shouldn't have been taken by surprise.

Again, I don't think the blame either before the withdrawal, or for the entirety of this 20-year conflict, is going to boil down to one simple answer. While the president is ultimately responsible, this failure has a thousand fathers, so we need to make sure that we hold all to account and that we have an unsparing examination of not only how things went so wrong, but how we got into this position in the first place.

Reason: Walk us through your decision and motivation to go to Afghanistan.

Meijer: First off, the information we were getting from the administration was outdated, it was inaccurate, and sometimes just plain deceptive,

Reason: And you knew this before you decided to go?

Meijer: That was one of the strong, driving motivations to go. A number of us felt that we were not getting the information that we needed. That when it came to evacuating individuals, a lot of the expected assistance from the executive branch, unless you had personal contacts and connections, as some of us did, you were sending out cases into an email inbox that oftentimes was backlogged and it would bounce those emails back.

Reason: Wow.

Meijer: This was incredibly infuriating, because you were getting in our case over a thousand requests that were coming in that we were trying to action, trying to connect with sources on the ground. The way in which so much of the evacuations that people were able to get to safety got to safety was because we were in contact with people at those gates. We could send a photo to somebody on the ground and say, "Look for this guy and grab him." That was not something most congressional offices had.

So both in terms of understanding what the dynamic was on the ground, understanding the decision and the consequences of either keeping to the August 31 withdrawal deadline or trying to extend that, and the question of how do we most efficiently and effectively connect congressional offices and the people reaching out to them needing an evacuation with the folks on the ground, we came to the realization that we can't do this from afar, that we need to see what's going on, that this is a bit of a black hole and that it is the most important thing going on in the country—probably one of those significant foreign policy moments of recent memory. And the fact that we have no understanding, no visibility and ultimately no oversight, is problematic and troubling. And we need to correct that.

Reason: What did you see and learn on the ground that you did not know? How did it change your assessment of the situation?

Meijer: What I did not know from the onset was just how completely dependent we were on the Taliban for perimeter security, for physical security. That if our agreement with the Taliban broke down, that if they made the decision that they didn't want us there anymore, that we frankly would not be able to evacuate the vulnerable individuals: American citizens and our loyal Afghan allies. We might not even be able to evacuate our own uniformed military personnel. That it was a fragile, dangerous, volatile dynamic around that perimeter.

That was one of the reasons why we both changed our minds, and after speaking with commanders said, "We understand and we respect and support this decision to stick to this deadline. Not because we think it's a good option, but because of all of the bad options it is the least worse."

The other thing that we saw was just how many prophecies broke down, how hard it was to actually get folks through, and just the impossible position we were putting the Marines and soldiers who were manning those gates. And then more broadly, how little planning ahead of time had actually been done, and how much of everything that was achieved was on the fly, ad hoc, and thanks to military men and women, diplomatic individuals on the ground, rather than any significant degree of external support.

It's just a very volatile picture on the whole, and we were able to get insight that we couldn't have gotten through other channels, especially while the administration was stonewalling, or frankly I think didn't know as much of what was going on.

Reason: We're seeing some people on, for lack of a better phrase, the Tucker Carlson right, who are deeply skeptical about the national security wisdom of accepting refugees from Afghanistan. That basically we're inviting trouble, potential terrorist violence. Can you talk to your confidence in the vetting process and your feelings about such fears as expressed?

Meijer: On the vetting side, we saw the Department of Homeland Security personnel and our consular officials on the ground there doing that vetting: comparing the individuals who are there and who have passed the preliminary checks at the Kabul airport, but making sure that they actually A) have the requisite authorization and background or experience to be qualified for the programs that we have, to get them out. B) that those individuals pass our security vetting and screening criteria.

So they're checking their biometrics, checking them against their biometrics databases, doing name searches, other background check components that we're actually able to do far better than in most other circumstances, simply for the fact that we've been in Afghanistan collecting information for 20 years. So we have a much bigger body of knowledge than we would have in Syria, or in other comparable conflict areas.

I will say about a lot of the, to use your phrase, the Tucker Carlson right, is that it just doesn't have a full understanding of what they're talking about. And I get it, it's an easy way of falling back on tired tropes of these sort of dangerous dirty people from the outside world. The reality is that the folks we're bringing in, by and large, if they're not U.S. citizens, if they're not U.S. legal permanent residents, the people coming are those who are coming because the Taliban are trying to hunt them down because of the work they did for our government. So it's not just a random assemblage, it's not whoever was able to get on the plane. These are people who are known to us, who have veterans back home who are advocating for them.

I think it's telling that some of the passionate proponents of this evacuation, and working tirelessly to do so, have been the veterans community, have been people who've served in Afghanistan and to whom this is a personal issue, who know that these are not random individuals, these are our friends that we still talk to on WhatsApp and FaceTime and Facebook. And some of the most critical individuals are those who've never spent a day in service to this country.

Reason: You have upon your return been pretty critical of the White House, even using phrases like "lying" to describe what they have told the American people or Congress. Can you be specific about that, either in the White House or in the military leadership?

Meijer: Yeah. We'll start to go back with, maybe weren't dishonest assessments, but were overly optimistic or otherwise flawed, in terms of what we were seeing on the ground and the strength and competence of the Afghan National Security Forces.

If you want to talk to specific lies, one: that there is no more Al Qaeda in Afghanistan. That's a lie; we know it. Two: them saying that the Haqqani network and the Taliban are two separate entities. That's a lie. Three: that Americans were not "stranded"—Jen Psaki, that was a lie. Four: that Americans were not being beaten by the Taliban or being harassed trying to get into the airport. That was a lie. Boy, there's a bunch of others too. There's just things that, as soon as they leave that person's mouth, you're like, "Do you even know what the hell you're talking about?"

Reason: President Biden last night criticized the idea of having a mission without "clear, achievable goals," and said there's been too much of that in the last 20 years. I presume you agree with that as a general sentiment. So who do you blame? Specifically in Afghanistan, or anywhere else that you might want to point to.

Meijer: I think you can certainly and appropriately spread a lot of blame, it's just that it's dependent on what failure we are highlighting. Specifically, when it comes to the botched withdrawal, that responsibility lies with the State Department that was responsible for it, and the president to whom they answer.

But for the failure of the conflict, that starts across administrations. It gets to the balance of power, between the president and the Congress. Congress delegating its oversight responsibilities, especially its authorities around war powers. Some blame also lies with the American media that got disconnected from the realities on the ground, that as soon as Americans weren't dying, they stopped paying attention, even though a record numbers of civilians and Afghan National Security Forces were losing their lives, from an outside view seemed like everything was hunky-dory. And also the American people for contributing to that disengagement.

There is widespread blame to go around for the conduct of the past 20 years, but for the conduct of the past two and a half weeks, or the past two months, that fault lies with the president and the State Department, almost exclusively.

Reason: What do you pin on military leadership for this? You can't have a 20-year mission, regardless of how you redefine it over the years, without those plans being drawn up by brass.

Meijer: I certainly pin just how many generals believe their own propaganda or their own spin. That sense of "We can control a reality by controlling the message and controlling the narrative." That works for a little bit, but then eventually reality has a vote. The enemy has a vote. Wars are not fought on TV; they're fought on the battlefield. And just because the TV cameras aren't on the battlefield doesn't mean you're winning on the battlefield.

I'm certainly highly, highly, highly critical of the conduct of any number of senior officers, of senior leadership, over the past two decades. And just the failure of our national security establishment to create and hold to a strategic plan or a strategic objective. I think that's something that we have been missing in a widespread fashion.

So I'm very angry at everybody over this, including myself, including Congress. I think we need to be, again, unsparing in our criticism, because if we don't learn every lesson—and not just learn it but apply it—we'll be doing a disservice to all those who lost their lives in this conflict, to all of the blood and treasure that was spilled.

It's delusional to call what has happened over the past two decades, and as we saw encapsulated over the past two weeks, anything but an abject failure.

Reason: Talk a bit about that congressional role in it. You are obviously a freshman, a rookie out there. How has being face-to-face with how this stuff is done opened your eyes about oversight and process in the legislative branch?

Meijer: I would say that it's clearly been highly illuminating. The process has been inadequate or nonexistent from that oversight standpoint. When military leadership is evasive or unresponsive to the most responsive and accountable body to the American people, I think there's something fundamentally broken there that we have to correct.

So I make no bones about being furious and livid at any number of individuals who've been associated with this failure, and I think it is critically important for the country that, again, we're unsparing in that accountability. That we don't just say, "Well, mistakes were made. Let's just move past it and forget it," but we examine the whole damn thing.

Reason: One of the oldest clichés in American foreign policy discussion is Eisenhower's line about the "military-industrial complex," a warning of it in his farewell address. Is there a truth behind that cliché, do you think, in terms of a machinery set up to keep extending U.S. military engagement, of using the military as a problem-solving and also a jobs program? Or is that too simplified?

Meijer: I think that has more of an impact on some of the larger, more discreet weapons purchases. There's a reason why parts of the F-35 are made in probably every congressional district. There's a reason why parts of the C-130 are made in probably every congressional district. That is certainly an impact, and something that plays a role.

I don't think that in the case of why the conflict in Afghanistan lasted so long. I'd place a lot more blame on just the momentum that was created and the hands-off approach by too many in government. I think that was far more operative than any sort of nefarious, string-pulling complex. I'm not completely dismissing that possibility; I've just yet to meet anybody who has actually understood or knew what was going on to a sufficient degree to be able to orchestrate such an outcome.

Reason: I have heard from a lot of Afghanistan vets over the past week or two. Lord knows how many you have heard from, being a vet yourself and a congressman. Can you characterize, for those who aren't in those types of conversations, what people are going through right now?

Meijer: I would say despair, frustration, disillusionment. A lot of that has been put off, because in the short term, they're still trying to rescue and help out their friends who were left behind, so I think a lot of the consequences will not be fully realized for the weeks or months to come. But in some ways, this kind of feels far more visceral and immediate, partially because of how rapidly the situation collapsed, but also because we are watching it all in real time. This is not something that Cronkite is narrating on the evening news. We're getting live updates by the second on Twitter, and messages from people that are stuck over there on WhatsApp, so there's an immediacy and a saliency that I think are pretty novel and unique to this moment.

We've already seen calls to the suicide prevention hotlines. We've already seen a spike in text messages on the V.A.'s crisis line that have gone up 87 percent in the past two weeks, or since mid- or early August. So there are going to be some deep and pernicious and dangerous long-term impacts from this, and frankly we need to be doing everything we can to mitigate those while we still can.

Reason: You've talked a couple times about being "unsparing" about Congress's role. What's an action item about that? What do you need to do, right now, going forward, in terms of concrete activity?

Meijer: One, the creation of an independent bipartisan commission, styled after the 9/11 Commission or the Iraq Study Group. This outside effort that will look at the whole in its entirety. Number two, that AUMF reform, that war powers reform, and reforming and taking back to Congress its responsibilities. Number three, the creation of an independent congressional intelligence analysis bureau. We don't trust the president to give us accurate budget numbers, so we have a Congressional Budget Office, but somehow when it comes to intelligence assessments that influence how decisions are made within the executive branch and our national security strategy, we assume that the president will be upfront and honest. I think that is unwise.

Number four is we need a much more long-term reform of how our national security establishment, whether it's defense or diplomatic, or the intelligence community, how they are structured, how they prioritize information, how they align their operations with strategic objectives. Because when those operations aren't aligned, when they're just helter skelter, as we've seen over the past couple of weeks, or as we've seen over the past couple of decades, you quickly come into a scenario where what initially may have been neat and orderly and disciplined, it becomes just a jobs program for military officials in and of itself.

And I think that blends the chaos, confusion, and mission creep, and frankly deceit, that we've seen most recently in the chaotic withdrawal from Afghanistan.

Reason: A lot of people, including the president yesterday to some degree, are seeing what has gone down this past month in Afghanistan as the end of an era—or the beginning of an era. It's a moment of great symbolism, directionally. Do you see it as such, and if so, in what way?

Meijer: I think the sort of post–Cold War belief in the "indispensable nation," and the post-9/11 belief that we can do anything—I think that's been pretty roundly humbled.

If you look over the past nine months, between the pandemic, the violent events at the Capitol on January 6, and this collapse in Afghanistan, it's no wonder that a lot of folks are exhausted and disillusioned and probably incredibly concerned about the direction of the country, about where we're heading, about what's going to happen next. I think it's important that we have a government that is as responsive and is effective, and that renews the confidence that I think has been by and large shattered.

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  1. Meijer: “The intelligence community is completely fucked, they have no idea what is going on; their information is wrong and they really dropped the ball.”

    Also Meijer: “We can totally vet thousands upon thousands of Afghan refugees. We got this. Our intelligence is solid.”

    What a fucking clown — which explains quite well why Reason saw fit to interview him.

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    3. So a guy who went there, who has firsthand knowledge of the whole thing is wrong, but a frozen fish stick trust fund baby who got dunked on by Jon Stewart so hard that he stopped wearing his signature bow ties is correct. Based on…? That he tells you what you want to hear.

      1. “who got dunked on by Jon Stewart”

        Now claim the same thing, but as Buttplug.

      2. Gee, DOL asshole, you’ve taken two months and STILL haven’t found a single lie from Ken who you claimed lied constantly?
        Perhaps you’re simply cementing your rep as a lying pile of lefty shit.

        1. That’s been cemented as long as I’ve been here.

      3. I’ll need to hear (former?) Prince Harry’s opinion before making up my mind.

    4. If the intended uses of the info differ, then likely the sourcing of info also differs between the “intelligence community” and the State Department. Also, the class of failure that he appears to attribute to the intelligence community is of a nature unrelated to vetting of individual refugees. Anyway, as he allegedly has a background in the intelligence community and actually checked the status of things on site, his assessments are not necessarily contradictory.

      1. So he’s accusing himself of having no idea what’s going on

    5. You should take any politician that sees fit to talk to Reason with a huge grain of salt.

    6. It is intelligence in different contexts.

    7. They forgot to discuss/mention WHY US went there, quite ILLEGALLY, with no UNSC not UN mandate, and based on the nonsensical conspiracy theory about an Arab in an Afghan cave who shut down the 1/2T$ US air defenses with his laptop, then had one of his 22 his L Pilots, this one couldn’t solo a Cessna172 with 600 logged hours, fly a hologram, at the impossible ground level speed of 580mph, right through a Twin Tower, and ‘crush’ it so well, that the remains could be removed overnight in 4 hours, instead of taking 4 years. That being.. Millions of tons of twisted steel girders, glass, concrete, air con machines and ducts, plumbing and sanitary ware, wiring and emergency genes, office equipment,, and 3000 HUMANS.. that in 2 100M high mounds.. (physics), not forgetting, the 2 remaining central cores, 417M high(!)! as the floors had ‘pancaked’, according to NIS. Search ”.9/11 Hologram Plane Theory – Bill Cooper RIP Nov 5 2001”. NO PLANES, JUST LIES. Go home.

  2. Sounds like Welch just wants us to stay in Afghanistan another 10 years.

    1. Only if NATO does. Matt loves hisself some NATO.

    2. Meijer certainly does. Matt’s been a neocon-lib for at least going on 20 years.

      1. Meijer has said he doesn’t. He campaigned on it before the withdrawal.

        1. Meijer seems to be spending tax money to have staffers shill in the Reason comments section.

  3. I think it’s important that we have a government that is as responsive and is effective, and that renews the confidence that I think has been by and large shattered.

    Fuck off, you statist piece of shit. We need a government that will go away and leave us alone. Why the fuck should we trust government? We need to not trust government.

  4. When you affirmatively state the admin is lying about this, and still hold your ground on the lies told about 1/6 and Trump, you’re not engaging honestly.

    But given the raging TDS around here I’d expect nothing else.

  5. Guess Tucker Carlson is Reason’s whipping boy today.

    1. Tucker Carlson has the audacity to insist that the people living in this country should have some say over who immigrates into their communities and that admitting thousands of third world Afghans from a medieval hellhole torn asunder by twenty years of failed war into the middle of Pleasantville might, just might, have a negative impact on people’s lives.

      If globohomo is squirming, it means you’re doing something right.

      1. They have had their say. They voted out the guy who brought them the muslim ban. And that guy only got there in spite of the majority of people not wanting him in the first place. You can thank backwater hick affirmative action for that one.

        1. “They voted out”

          Lol.

        2. What ‘Muslim ban’ are you talking about? We’ve never had a ‘Muslim ban’

          1. Not even bans on assault style Muslims.

          2. People like De are bigots and racist so if you suggest maybe not letting people from war torn Middle East countries move here without vetting them first, you obviously hate an entire religion.

      2. “Tucker Carlson has the audacity to insist that the people living in this country should have some say over who immigrates into their communities ”

        If you think you have the right to dictate where other people are allowed to live, you might not get this whole “libertarian” thing.

        1. Afghan squatters have a right to live in your house.

          Go ahead and disagree, fascist.

          1. Your community isn’t your property you big dummy. Why can’t you busybodies just leave people alone and worry about your own life? It really isn’t hard.

            1. You’re a moron with no real argument or point. This is all far beyond you.

            2. Your community isn’t your property

              That’s right. It is some Afghan’s property, because [reasons] …

              1. Just bow to your corporate masters already.

            3. This land is the birthright of those whose descendants conquered it.

              1. That’s exactly how the world works, yes.

            4. You didn’t build that community.

            5. Because they’re fanatical Muslim terrorists who wish to die for the cause and take me with them?

  6. “why Tucker Carlson is wrong”

    Looks like JournoList lit the Bar Signal and said “attack that fucker Tucker in your columns today, guys”.
    ENB, De Rugy and now Welch.

    1. And, yet, despite their simping for nearly every leftist agenda listed in the quarterly publication entitled “Things to be Pretend to be Outraged over Today!”, the whores at this absurd rag are still lumped together with those deplorable insurrectionists and will be disposed of with just as much contempt, if not more.

      You can only suck that dick for so long before they demand to stick it in your ass, Reason.

    2. Getting kinda tedious. Seems like Tucker Carlson is a bigger threat to liberty than vaccine reeducation camps in Australia.

    3. Today?
      It’s been nonstop for a week or two.

  7. This is what you wanted, Meijer. This is what you voted during “impeachment” for.
    Own it. It’s yours.

  8. “I’m for free speech, but…”

    “I support the 2nd Amendment, but…”

    “I’m for ending these endless wars, but…”:

    So while I am sympathetic at the notion that we don’t want to be engaged in the forever war and we don’t want to be engaged in a forever exit, the reality is that we were moving towards this negotiated power-sharing agreement, and then frankly stumbled on the one yard line. We failed to adjust our withdrawal, adjust the conditions as the security situation eroded, as the Afghan National Security Forces and Afghan government’s credibility and durability eroded. We just made the mad rush for the exits.

  9. Yeah he’s a full on statist but a lot smarter than I thought. I actually appreciate Reason printing this interview. Dude has some valuable insights and probably a big improvement over Amash. Not as dreamy though. Sad.

    1. Are you kidding? A Meijer? The dudes family is worth over $2billion. They got him a spot in West Point. He washed out first year and managed a degree in anthropology somewhere. Then one of those bullshit business degrees. He got a reserve appointment and his year in intel Iraq.

      I do not disagree with much of what he says. He is not the least bit libertarian.

        1. Extremely.
          Can’t even address anything the comment it replied to mentions

      1. I thought Meijer made some very good points, also.

        I do not agree with him that we need a new bureaucracy established (a Congressional intelligence analysis office?! What?!) to make things better. Just the thought of a lunatic like AOC directing a Congressional intelligence analysis office should scare the living shit out of any sentient human being.

        When our mission morphed in 2002 from killing the bastards who attacked us (and their enablers), to rebuilding the broken Pottery Barn….that was the critical error, strategically.

      2. Didn’t mean to imply he was even slightly libertarian.

        1. I was just commenting on him, not your comment.

  10. You know if the Afghans themselves were shocked and utter blindsided by the collapse of their govt it’s no surprise all of Europe, Russia, China and the USA were likewise taken aback by the speed of the collapse. Y’all all.want to talk about why didn’t the USA evacuate thousands sooner well why the fuck didn’t those mfers evacuate themselves on the commercial flights when they had the chance to in May, in June, in July? They were warned over and over again to evacuate months before Kabul fell. The butthurt that actually motivates all this fucking whining is the about Biden not intervening and blowing up that agreement with the Taliban. These mfers from the Afghan prez to the contractors to the Congressmfers all wanted Biden to attack the Taliban to stop their advance which would have restarted a full on war. That’s what this is mainly about. These people are mad at Biden because he didn’t restart the war. Biden let that piece of shit Afghan govt we spent 300 million a day collapse.

    And as far the SIV people from what I understand it was common knowledge that it was taking 18-24 months to clear an application and that’s not even taking into account the active sabotage of an already tedious process. Where were these assholes last year screaming about the SIV? Why didn’t they call out Trump and his sabotage? And surely they realize it took the collapse of the Afghan govt for there to be a political opening for a mass evacuation? Instead of attacking the people who sent the troops back in to pull off the greatest humanitarian airlift ever, they should be grateful It was a Democrat and not a Republican in that White House because you know damn well the Republicans would have done jackshit on the humanitarian angle. Their most likely response would have been to restart the war.
    We are so lucky we’re out of Afghanistan because their was a world of powerful and influential people tying to keep us stuck there.

    1. It’s all your fault, and no one is buying your bullshit. You worthless faggots fail at EVERYTHING and then blame the people who actually did a decent job fixing your fuck ups. Own your failure.

      Your time grows short. At the rate things are going, you and your friends will need to be dealt with sooner than later.

      1. He thinks he’ll be safe when it all goes down.

        1. The left is cancer. Death squads are the answer.

    2. No they were not shocked and blindsided.

      They hated us at least as much as the Taliban and their own government.

      At least half of their army just walked away and joined up. There was never a resistance. The Afghan political and military was a sham. We knew that more than a decade ago.

      Yup we messed up the evacuation.

      1. “…At least half of their army just walked away and joined up. There was never a resistance. The Afghan political and military was a sham. We knew that more than a decade ago…”

        You have proven to be a pathetic piece of TDS-addled shit, so it’s a good bet that, like trueman, you have no support for that claim at all.
        Suggestion: STFU, TDS-addled pile of shit. You won’t look as pathetically stupid as you’re trying to be.

    3. Lard Ass Shithole barfs up another post sucking Biden’s flaccid dick once more.

    4. Lord of Strazele
      September.2.2021 at 7:47 pm
      Flag Comment Mute User

      “You know if the Afghans themselves were shocked and utter blindsided by the collapse of their govt it’s no surprise all of Europe, Russia, China and the USA were likewise taken aback by the speed of the collapse. Y’all all.want to talk about why didn’t the USA evacuate thousands sooner well why the fuck didn’t those mfers evacuate themselves on the commercial flights when they had the chance to in May, in June, in July? They were warned over and over again to evacuate months before Kabul fell. The butthurt that actually motivates all this fucking whining is the about Biden not intervening and blowing up that agreement with the Taliban. These mfers from the Afghan prez to the contractors to the Congressmfers all wanted Biden to attack the Taliban to stop their advance which would have restarted a full on war. That’s what this is mainly about. These people are mad at Biden because he didn’t restart the war. Biden let that piece of shit Afghan govt we spent 300 million a day collapse.
      And as far the SIV people from what I understand it was common knowledge that it was taking 18-24 months to clear an application and that’s not even taking into account the active sabotage of an already tedious process. Where were these assholes last year screaming about the SIV? Why didn’t they call out Trump and his sabotage? And surely they realize it took the collapse of the Afghan govt for there to be a political opening for a mass evacuation? Instead of attacking the people who sent the troops back in to pull off the greatest humanitarian airlift ever, they should be grateful It was a Democrat and not a Republican in that White House because you know damn well the Republicans would have done jackshit on the humanitarian angle. Their most likely response would have been to restart the war.
      We are so lucky we’re out of Afghanistan because their was a world of powerful and influential people tying to keep us stuck there.”

      What we know is that your assumptions and supposed claims are NWS.
      You have been shown to post outright lies, ‘opinions’ which are such that not any above the 3rd year in the 6th grade would admit to holding.
      The above is nothing more than a pathetic attempt to excuse droolin’ Joe from the greatest foreign policy fuck up since at least Carter, and an admission that your are entirely too much of a steaming pile of lefty shit to be other than the object of insults; anyone of normal intelligence would have the decency to be embarrassed, asshole

      1. “These people are mad at Biden because he didn’t restart the war.” Have you already forgotten that Trump had an agreement with the Taliban to leave in May? If the Taliban were serious about that agreement, Biden _did_ restart the war when he breached it – but without any plan to either fight or to use the added time for a more effective evacuation.

    5. Biden still fucked up, as usual. Lefties still abrogate all personal responsibility, as usual. Everyone’s laughing at you for being an idiot, as usual.

  11. So how exactly are they going to solidly vet thousands of refugees when all the up to date info sources on them are in the hands of the enemy? Inquiring minds want to know.

    1. The interview above goes into a fair amount of detail on how they are being vetted.

      1. And steaming piles of lefty ship like you can’t seem to provide any cites supporting your bullshit.
        It’s difficult when you can’t get 2 after adding 1 and 1, right, Mike?

      2. Well as long as you’re convinced

      3. Asshole mikey sock decides for you.

  12. “this failure has a thousand fathers, so we need to make sure that we hold all to account”

    Or, “this success has a thousand fathers, so we need to make sure that we reward all handsomely.”

    Which version is closer to what eventually pans out?

  13. Politicians like Meijer are why people despise Republicans.

    1. He’s no Republican.

      1. Yes, he is a Republican, just like McCain, Bush, and the rest of the corrupt, war mongering, authoritarian neocons.

  14. “Specifically, when it comes to the botched withdrawal, that responsibility lies with the State Department that was responsible for it, and the president to whom they answer.”

    Right.
    You’re a Brainless doofus that puts a Blinken Idiot in charge of the state department and put that fool in charge of the withdrawal.
    You get a Blinken fuckup.
    Simple Fool.

  15. Imagine if lying was criminalized everywhere just like it already necessarily is in court and contracts.

    This wouldn’t merry be an expression of political outrage. There would be consequences.

    Lying is coercion, compelling people under the false authority of truth to act in the liars interest instead of their own.

    This should mean something to everyone, libertarians in particular.

    1. It has been an extremely long time since I have seen anything remotely libertarian on Reason. Certainly not the articles, certainly not the woke left-wing writers, and the commenters all seem to be either frustrated conservatives or liberal trolls. It is to bad, Reason was once respected. No longer.

      1. “all seem to be either frustrated conservatives or liberal trolls.”

        I think all of society has taken a serious intellectual downturn.

        I try to make and refute arguments, bound by the reality of logic and science. It seems completely foreign not only to the commenters here but is only a novel idea to others I speak to.

        People say ridiculous things like, “whose truth” or “perception is reality”, and believe it.

        Our inalienable rights are being trampled on and that’s perceived as a partisan game.

        It’s nightmarish.

  16. Just as a stylistic point, if you’re going to use in your own sentence a couple of words that happened to be used by somebody else, it’s silly to put quotation marks around them, unless you mean them to be “sneer quotes”; (In which case you’d better justify that.) Either publish real quotes, or own up to using your own choice of words, don’t try to have it both ways.

  17. Douglas Murray’s “the strange death of Europe” very thoughtfully, and without malice, destroyed a lot of my previously held assumptions about the immigration issue.

    Obviously, the US is a little different being a nation of immigrants. We’re also way bigger and better able to handle an influx.

    But the self destructive politics of the thing is very congruent with Europe. The economic arguments for mass migration are mostly the same. And most of them are bad. The complete lack of real control of the situation is also similar. Europe agreed to take in Syrian refugees, and half of Africa and the Middle East shows up claiming to be Syrian. Once they’re there, you can’t send them back unless you have a deal with their home country (assuming you can identify them).

    And when local citizens understandably get concerned, the inevitable allegations of bigotry emerge. Personally, I’ll take 90,000 Commie hating American flag waving Cubans and Venezuelans who want to work for a better life any day. But there should be some genuine control over the process.

    And On the flip side, from a libertarian standpoint, what’s the rush to undermine the legal sovereignty and the cultural basis of a nation built on individual freedom?

    I realize there’s some ancap argument that national borders are imaginary or whatever, but it’s almost exactly like the communist argument for the same thing.

  18. A group of women in Kabul just staged a protest against the Taliban recently to promote womens’ rights. We planted the seeds for the women in Afghanistan to become doctors, engineers, TV News reporters, etc. It may be that because we gave them a taste of this over the last 20 years that it will become the status quo sooner than otherwise. For anyone to just proclaim that our intervention was a complete waste of time? How do they know? Maybe there will be the initial repression, but in the long term, who knows?

    1. Maybe if you staged a protest for abortion, affirmative action and gender diversity you’d get the reaction you had every reason to expect.

    2. That and a civil war is brewing up north. A whole generation has grown up in relative freedom. The Taliban don’t even control the Taliban at this point. This is not going to go well.

  19. His reasoning makes no sense. “You need leverage to negotiate a power share government, so we should have adjusted our withdrawal as the Taliban picked up steam”. Any agreement we supposedly could have negotiated prior to withdrawal because of “leverage”. Would have dissolved the second we left anyway. the Taliban were always going for total control, and the facts on the ground show they always were in a position to achieve that without us committing to endless war. This guy has no brain.

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