Meat

Manufactured Meats Coming to a Grocery Store Near You Next Year?

The process uses 99 percent less land and 96 percent less freshwater than traditional meat production.

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Future Meat Technologies announced last week that it can now produce 1,100 pounds of meat daily from animal cells grown in industrial-scale bioreactors at its facilities in Israel. The company is scouting several locations in the U.S to build large-scale plants to grow cultivated chicken, lamb, pork, and beef. It aims to get its cultivated meats into U.S. grocery stores in 2022. Sadly, this timeline may be too optimistic since getting lab-grown meats onto your plate will require approval from two notoriously sluggish federal regulatory agencies, the U.S. Department of Agriculture and the Food and Drug Administration.

The company claims that its "cruelty-free production process is expected to generate 80% less greenhouse emissions and use 99% less land and 96% less freshwater than traditional meat production." The current cost of four ounces of cultivated chicken breast is around $4, but the company expects to cut that in half in the next year or so. Even at that price, Future Meat Technologies' chicken breasts would still be a bit more than double the average price of conventionally produced boneless chicken breasts.

Future Meat Technologies founder Yaakov Nahmias argues that cultivated steaks, pork chops, and chicken breasts will soon reach price parity with meats produced through traditional animal agriculture. "Our goal is to make cultured meat affordable for everyone, while ensuring we produce delicious food that is both healthy and sustainable, helping to secure the future of coming generations," said Nahmias in a statement.

Future Meat Technologies is at the forefront of a growing wave of cultivated meat companies that seek to produce tasty animal proteins using only animal cells grown in bioreactors. Earlier this month, consulting firm McKinsey & Company noted in a new article, "Cultivated meat: Out of the lab, into the frying pan," that there are about 100 cultivated meat startups around the world. McKinsey's analysts point out that the cost of producing slaughter-free meats has been dropping dramatically and estimate that prices will fall below $5 per pound this decade.

"Currently, the world primarily eats the meat of animals that are the easiest to farm industrially, but cultivated meat won't face those constraints," notes the report. "Instead, the industry could select cell lines from specific animals with the best traits, such as Wagyu beef [$212 per pound] or wild salmon [$25 per pound], and replicate them at the same cost as, say, beef patties [$2.48 per pound] or tilapia [$4.16 per pound]. The McKinsey report notes that some companies are already exploring ways to cultivate exotic meats such as kangaroo, water buffalo, and alpaca.

Another big advantage of meat factories is that they can be located anywhere in the world, even near cities. In addition, since cultivated meats are grown in disease-free bioreactors, consumers may come to regard them as safer than slaughterhouse meats.

Let's consider a scenario in which half of all the meat eaten by Americans was grown in bioreactors by 2050. Currently, about 41 percent of the land area (780 million acres) of the contiguous United States is devoted to pasturage and livestock feed. Cutting that in half could free up 390 million acres that could revert to nature. That is an area that is nearly four times bigger than all national and state parks and wilderness areas in the contiguous U.S.

NEXT: This Suicidal, Gasoline-Drenched Man Burned to Death After Cops Tased Him. A Federal Court Says That's Reasonable Force.

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118 responses to “Manufactured Meats Coming to a Grocery Store Near You Next Year?

  1. $2 for four ounces of the blandest meat that exists? Why are they starting with chicken instead of the good stuff. The only way this is economical is if they can convince consumers they are actually getting some quality for the 4X to 8x price they are paying per pound of meat. Also, why the fuck would the land go back to nature instead of to human inhabitation?

    1. No, their market is vegetarians. “Cruelty-free” is the tip-off.

      1. I enjoy eating meat, but factory farming is much crueler than hunting or small scale. If I actually reflected on the life of the animals I eat, I couldn’t continue to consume it in good conscience.
        In a perfect world, I’d only eat meat I killed myself.
        I probably won’t eat this junk, but I can’t fault people who are more committed to the dignity of animals than I am.

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        2. Factory farming is gross in a lot of ways, but it’s respnsible for reducing the proportion of income that Americans spend on food. People at every income level are able to afford more food, in larger varieties, at lower cost than ever before. If you can afford to think about the welfare of the cows you eat, great, but it’s also important to think of the welfare of the people as well. Not everyone can afford to make humane farming a priority in their food budget.

        3. Regenerative ranching can make meat production humane.

        4. I enjoy eating meat, but factory farming is much crueler than hunting or small scale.

          One of the Dad’s I know from scouting cleaned a deer early this spring. Apparently, someone had shot it with an arrow that passed through just above the lungs and it was ambling around bleeding in his back yard. He called the local police/DNR to make sure he was OK to kill it. A police officer showed up with a 9mm, a round he or I couldn’t have legally shot the deer with for lack of power/penetration. Once he got the deer cleaned up, he tanned the hide. There were several scars on the right hindquarters where something had clawed at it hard enough to penetrate the hide.

          My brother, about a month ago, went out to his back yard and discovered a big, fat doe hung up in the fencerow. It was tangled and bleeding and it wouldn’t let him near enough to get it untangled. Rather than let it bleed to death, he bought a tag from the DNR and shot it. Once he got it untangled from the fence, he discovered that the likely reason it couldn’t get over the fence was because it was pregnant with two fawns. Neither of them survived.

          Two years ago I was out hunting and a doe walked right out into the open. I’m not entirely sure what it’s problem was but it was big enough that it couldn’t have been a yearling but was emaciated enough that it wasn’t worth shooting.

          I’ve slaughtered a couple of cows, possibly hundreds of pigs, and maybe a dozen chickens (and untold multitudes of vermin). I’ve never had to plan my shot in case the first blow didn’t kill the animal. Never had to track one by the blood trail. Never had to figure out whether I should kill the animal to put it out of its misery or been surprised to discover that the animal had offspring that will likely be food for other predators.

          Factory farming is cruel because you live in a pretend world where meat just shows up in supermarket shelves wrapped in plastic.

          1. Nature can be cruel and contain a lot of suffering. But generally factory farms are worse (at least for chickens and pigs, cows I’m less sure about). Animals in the wild often die painful deaths, as you correctly point out. But generally before that they weren’t in cramped cages and pens where they could barely move, they got to run free. They probably died in a less humane way than they would have in a slaughterhouse, but their life before that was significantly better.

            Imagine you had a choice between dying peacefully, but spending the rest of your life in a tiny cage with nothing to do, or living a normal life of the same length that ends by being mauled to death by a bear. I think most people would prefer the later.

    2. Ron’s mortgage seems to be doing the talking again.

      Will free range cicada ranching be his next big thing , or gluten free engagement rings?

      https://vvattsupwiththat.blogspot.com/2021/06/virtue-is-35000000000-ton-carbon-tax-on.html

    3. “why the fuck would the land go back to nature instead of to human inhabitation?”

      Because it’s not needed for human habitation. People are moving away from rural areas and into urban centers.

  2. Substitute meat products are soyrry excuses for the real thing.

  3. Manufactured Meat won a victory today at the SC.

    1. *golf clap*

      1. ew…………

    2. Not really, the real victory would be at the grocery store cash register, and that has not happened yet, and may never happen.

      1. Joke went
        ———————
        Your head

  4. Sadly, this timeline may be too optimistic since getting lab-grown meats onto your plate will require approval from two notoriously sluggish federal regulatory agencies, the U.S. Department of Agriculture and the Food and Drug Administration.

    I’ve never been so grateful for the USDA and FDA.

    1. “I’ve never been so grateful for the USDA and FDA.”

      Why do you care?

  5. “The McKinsey report notes that some companies are already exploring ways to cultivate exotic meats such as kangaroo, water buffalo, and alpaca.”

    Only exotic in the US. Except alpacas They are everywhere.

    I guess they are smart enough to realize it would be pointless to try venison in the US, or even elk.

    1. I used to enjoy ostrich burgers, but they’re too expensive now.

      1. The high price is a birden ostrich meat lovers must bear.

      2. Wait until the nest egg is bigger.

        1. Until then he’ll just have to cry fowl.

        2. Buffalo ostrich wings would be great, too.

        3. That’s a good yolk.

      3. Just stick your head in the sand and wait for the market to adjust.

  6. Twice as expensive and smells like excrement. No thanks.

    1. I don’t have a problem with the crazy far left wing faggots eating this shit, as long as the normal people like you and me can still get the real McCoy and everything is labeled honestly and accurately.

      I don’t know how confident I am that will actually be the case though. I fear that it’s inevitably only a matter of time until they start trying to push the soylent green as being the real thing on us.

      1. Commies beget famines. Once they’re in charge there wont even be mystery meat to buy.

      2. Fetuses are the perfect vegan protein source.

        There is literally no difference between lab cultured clumps of cells and uterine cultured clumps. Not alive and never was. Eat up!

        1. Stop egging the soylentarians on.

        2. Cell-cultured meat likely won’t have the same appearance or texture as real meat, MacDonald says. It’s also costly to produce. – iowafarmbureau

        3. Bill Gates Wants Us to Eat 100% Synthetic Beef.
          “You can get used to the taste difference, and the claim is they’re going to make it taste even better over time. – Bill Gates Feb 19, 2021
          This seems to dispute. your suppositions.
          If Bill Gates is for it, I am against it.

          1. Totally. That’s why I have an IBM mainframe in my garage instead of a PC.

            1. That’s why I have an IBM mainframe in my garage instead of a PC.

              Hilarious that, even in jest, you have no idea how much this says about you.

  7. How about energy? I bet it uses way more energy.

    All water usage reduction estimates I’ve seen appear to be mostly lies. They count natural rainfall as usage. The factory is probably using municipal water, which has a much higher cost and environmental impact.

    1. Even at that price, Future Meat Technologies’ chicken breasts would still be a bit more than double the average price of conventionally produced boneless chicken breasts.

      The price reflects the energy inputs. So when your eco-friendly “alternative” product is 5x the price, it’s usually because it requires 5x the energy and resources.

      1. I think it is great that these products exist for the people who want them. I just find the environmental justification an insult.

        1. I just find the environmental justification an insult.

          it usually is.

        2. Like battery technology

        3. The ability to virtue signal about what you eat is priceless though.

      2. …and the 90+% of the water “used” by cows is actually rain water. So we aren’t “wasting” any freshwater on cows.

        1. It’s not just the cows’ drinking water. It’s the feed or grass that requires water.

    2. No problem. There will be plenty of unemployed cattle who can take jobs as draft animals.

    3. Yeah, the Impossible Burger environmental claims don’t stand up to the slightest scrutiny. The gasoline expended getting grain from the field to the feed troughs counts, the gasoline expended shipping soy and refined pea protein to the production line doesn’t. The man hours spent ‘tending’ herds, even if only mending fences, count; the man hours spent cleaning equipment and facilities don’t. The environmental slight-of-hand isn’t even subtle.

  8. There will always be a market for the real thing, hence Wagyu beef.

  9. Just another pander to rich, mostly white progressive “elites”. The vast majority of the country can’t afford to pay 2x their current cost for the “same thing”.

    1. And at 1100 pounds a day, it’s not anywhere near enough to feed more than the progressive elites anyway.

  10. Tried the “Impossible Burger” – looked good, tasted like, well not sure, but no one would be fooled into thinking it was beef.
    100% no thanks.

    1. Alice Waters says you should eat it.

    2. Of course, Impossible Burger is plant based, whereas this is actual meat.

      1. They have done an incredibly good job with Impossible Burgers. Even has “blood” that comes out of the meat when you cook it.

    3. The Impossible Burger is a plant-based meat substitute. What does that have to do with this article?

      1. A meat substitute is a meat substitute. Especially if you’re arguing that animal (cell) culture is inherently less/more efficient.

        1. Lab grown meat is meat, unless you are a lobbyist for the legacy farm industry

          1. So you’re already on the waiting list to have lab-grown muscle implanted in your body or you’re a lobbyist, right?

            1. I don’t need any muscles implanted in me, but once biotech advances to the point that it can grow hearts, kidneys, etc. I would absolutely be willing to take one of those as a transplant, should the need arise.

              Some of the folks in the cell-cultured industry actually came from research groups that tried to solve the organ manufacturing problem then realized that creating muscle, fat, and flesh for eating was a stepping stone toward functional organs.

              1. Some of the folks in the cell-cultured industry actually came from research groups that tried to solve the organ manufacturing problem then realized that creating muscle, fat, and flesh for eating was a stepping stone toward functional organs.

                Must be some pretty bright folks who got halfway into manufacturing organs and then discovered it was exactly like completely different applications where you manufacture organs.

                Now imagine saying anyone who might be hesitant to utilize the products of such illuminated minds must obviously be on the payroll of big medicine.

  11. I am curious enough that I will probably try some once in a while. I won’t expect it to be such a perfect match that I can’t tell the difference. I mostly expect the difference to be off-putting, even disgusting enough that one bite might be my limit, or maybe just the smell of it cooking.

    My real interest is not imitations, but completely made-up varieties that don’t pretend to be something else. That will be the interesting future. Like plastics once they stopped trying to imitate existing natural materials.

    1. Waiting for the first ad campaign claiming “Escaped from our labs: Deliciousness!”

      1. Fauci could be the spokesman for lab created bat meat.

    2. That last paragraph is pure truth, and the only way this will ever go mainstream. The vegetarians aren’t the future of any food market. The people who want good tasting food and don’t care where it came from are.

    3. My real interest is not imitations, but completely made-up varieties that don’t pretend to be something else.

      Or even those that do pretend, just not pretending to overthrow society by punching above their weight at everyone in the room. I already eat plenty of processed meat products (wild and domestic) which should be dead simple to displace, reproduce, or otherwise engineer. Mrs. Casual doesn’t drink Mike’s Hard Cranberry Lemonade because it’s going to eliminate the scourge of factory vodka, displace industrial cranberry, and undercut big lemonade. I won’t care too much if my near-right sized, near-right texture, whiskey-flavored brisket came from a turkey, half the people eating it are dunking it in corn syrup sauce anyway. Just don’t try and force me to believe that it’s the genuine article, let alone better.

      1. I already eat plenty of processed meat products (wild and domestic)

        Hell, a significant portion of the time my venison sausage is cut with pork.

  12. The cattle out my back door eat grass and drink stream water. If they don’t eat the grass, what will and how does that help?

    1. It helps because meat is a sin in their religion.

      Nothing will eat the grass, but some person’s life will be materially worse and environmentalist religious types will rejoice at the holy suffering and deprivation that person is experiencing for the Earth.

  13. The new BLM head to end grazing on Fed land. She’s an ecoterrorist who spiked trees to kill loggers and wanted a China-style forced birth control policy.
    Bill Gates buying up farmland. GND/ Infrastructure Bill to tax meat for the environment.
    Free Minds and Free Markets my ass. Woketarians will be cheering our daily rations of Soylent Green being limited for our own good when we are in the camps.

  14. Environmentalists are free to pursue their religion.

    But isn’t Reason supposed to be about liberty? How are environmentalist sin-free (or sin-lite) meat products related to liberty or society?

    1. The god of the woke is a very jealous god.

    2. Entrepreneurs creating a product that has the potential to have vastly more efficient production, that shows that private innovation can solve the environmental cost of eating meat in a manner that environmental regulators never would have conceived of, that is currently being held up due to massive bureaucracies would seem to very much be a libertarian story.

  15. Sure millions of years of evolution and you honestly think this won’t have health issues? Come on man…even Corn Pop won’t eat this crap

  16. Wont buy that crap.

    Bailey as a science anything is hilarious. Bunch of commie liars at unreason.

  17. What’s the point? We have all this farmland that isn’t being used as it is or is being developed on. Water falls from the sky in places not named California.

    The idea that either is particularly precious is silly.

    1. I love living at the confluence of the two largest rivers in North America, where it’s fairly rainy anyway, and seeing the same AdCouncil commercials about saving water as I do when I’m on a business trip to California or Florida.

      We have more clean fresh water than we know what to do with. It’s both cheap and abundant. And yeah, sometimes it falls from the sky. Like the last 5 days straight.

    2. What’s the point of cars? We already had horses
      What’s the point of the Internet? We already had ways to telecommunicate
      What’s the point of nuclear power? We already had coal and hydroelectric

      1. Even when new technologies are invented, the old ways rarely completely disappear. There are still people manufacturing buggy whips, but the market is much, much smaller. There will still be traditional meat.

      2. Got an ad that shows cars as being more efficient or environmentally friendly than horses? An ad showing the internet as being more efficient or environmentally friendly than the telephone? An ad showing nuclear power being more efficient or envornmentally friendly than coal or hydro?

        For a guy who couldn’t make the leap from one meat substitute to another, you sure seem to be capable of making leaps between completely unrelated and distinctly superior technologies and technologies that offer no significant improvements over existing technologies despite their claims.

        The funny thing is, if you actually cared about the technology, you’d want to root out these inequities and make products that show distinct advantages even better. Much the same way that, rather than pretending that ICEs produced less CO2 than horses or mules, we took their advantages and made them better. But you don’t care except to perpetuate the lie.

        1. What are you going on about? I never said anything about any technologies producing more or less CO2 or being more or less environmentally friendly than another

          1. What are you going on about? I never said anything about any technologies producing more or less CO2 or being more or less environmentally friendly than another

            Then maybe you should take the time to become even passively familiar with the claims about veggie and lab-grown meat before equating them to other technologies. It’s not so surprising how every other time you open your mouth, you demonstrate your ignorance on the topic(s).

            “The people rejecting lab-grown meat are just luddites in the same vein as those who rejected nuclear energy!” Just fucking retarded.

  18. Salt, olive oil, garbanzo beans, lemon juice, cayenne,,,,, then some prosciutto for breakfast after skipping meat the night before.

    I’m not a goo man

  19. When they can lab-grow a steak, that looks and tastes like a steak, and cooks like a steak, and has the marble pattern of a steak, I’ll try it.

    1. Someone should do the very opposite goal and make lab-grown broths. It would be much easier than trying to get the right texture, and would be useful in all kinds of cooking.

      1. Someone should do the very opposite goal and make lab-grown broths.

        “Lab-grown” broths are ancient. Animal cells break down and die in the absense of water. The intracellular structures that make up actual meat get discarded. You’re suggesting that someone (re-)invent the invisible pink unicorn that exists only in your head.

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  22. The best thing for the land is to have animals out on it. Regenerative ranching will save the environment not lab meat.

  23. some companies are already exploring ways to cultivate exotic meats such as kangaroo, water buffalo, and alpaca.

    That’s not exotic. Exotic is Hannibal Lecter’s postman

    1. Culturing human cells the purposes of consumption is definitely an interesting proposal. Should cannibalism still be illegal if a method exists that guarantees no harm to the actual humans and no disease transmission? The idea squicks me out, but to each their own.

      1. It’s analogous to the argument that kiddie porn shouldn’t be illegal if it is animated, since no kids were involved. Yeah, but, it still “squicks” everyone out.

      2. I looked it up and cannibalism is eating the flesh of OTHER humans. So if you cultured your own cells and ate it it wouldn’t be cannibalism.

  24. I think that the real breakthrough will be when the big fast food outlets start using these meats for more of their menu. These meats seem to tailored for that market. I also suspect that the big guys will know how to bring the cost in-line with what their customers are willing to pay. I still expect to buy range beef for steaks and turkey for the holidays, but there is no reason a Quarter Pounder or a chicken sandwich can’t come from a lab. Where the flavor not in the meat it is in the seasoning.

    1. Imagine a future where you walk into McDonald’s and can order “McMeat Nuggets”. Not chicken, not beef, but just McDonald’s own genetically-engineered meat.

      1. Yeah, because replacing sugar with corn syrup at McDonalds has been so easy and uncontroversial. Those damned conservative luddites ruin everything! Why can’t they just shut up and enjoy their “pink slime”?

  25. Why does lab-grown meat bring out all the Negative Nancies who can’t help but tell us how terrible this new thing they know nothing about is? Maybe its the perfect storm of new technology, changing something that’s been around forever, and vague adjacency to environmentalism.

    1. Speaking of new technology, lab-grown meat seems like it would be part of mankind’s glorious future colonizing space.

      I’ve been reading Jordan Peterson’s new book, “Beyond Order”. In the chapter on Rule 11, “Do not allow yourself to become resentful, deceitful, or arrogant.”, he claims that most people have a tendency toward conservatism or liberalism baked into their brains. He claims conservative-leaning people are wary of change.

      1. Speaking of new technology, lab-grown meat seems like it would be part of mankind’s glorious future colonizing space.

        Mars Ground Crew: Mission Control, we’ve been on Mars eating our nutrients from pouches and tubes for a couple years now. Hold off on sending up more oxygen scrubbers and waste water recyclers. What we really need is a bioreactor to start growing our own cultured meat.

        Mission Control: Copy Mars Ground Crew, be advised that if we just dehydrated some of the plain old meat that’s walking about all around us here on terra firma, it would weigh less than the materials to build the reactor and allow us to ship up the scrubbers and water filters. We’d have to dehydrate it either way but, for now, old-school MRE-style steaks would allow you to have your steak and drink water too. The time will come for us to make things dramatically more complicated at both ends. Let’s get a few more mission-critical issues resolved before we get to that point.

    2. Why does lab-grown meat bring out all the Negative Nancies who can’t help but tell us how terrible this new thing they know nothing about is? Maybe its the perfect storm of new technology, changing something that’s been around forever, and vague adjacency to environmentalism.

      When the original claim is about land/resource use, the environmental claims are neither vague nor adjacent. I’ve pointed this out in Ron’s articles before. He specifically says the land will be returned to nature. If the articles were just “We made veggie pork chops that don’t taste like cauliflower.”, most probably wouldn’t have a problem with it. Instead, the articles specifically make the case that “Private ranchers raise beef and it’s morally wrong of them to do that with their land.”

      Ron “The End Of Doom” Bailey, who used to pen articles about peak agriculture, consistently pens articles of the tone “If we don’t switch to cultured/veggie meat and grubs, we’ll run out of land and water.” The fact that you think the entire issue is about the texture of a cut of beef demonstrates how narrow-minded and stupid (intentionally or otherwise) you’re being.

  26. This will be interesting if we can actually get good Wagyu or Wild Salmon at cheaper prices. Also if they can get ideal samples so that say have great taste/higher Omega 3 levels for Salmon and perfectly marbled Wagyu with high MUFA.

    Otherwise for most meat eaters who could care less about sourcing–it’d be a novelty like beyond burger–sure we’ll try it but if its off in some way–why bother?

    Long term I’m bullish on lab / cultured meat–but its still unclear how good it will be in 2022. Their initial market is understandably those concerned with ethics/welfare who don’t mind paying more, even for slightly worse taste.

    Longer term it has to beat standard animal meat on price and at least match taste. 95% of people don’t care enough about the other stuff. When it comes to their wallets–there will be a wave of novelty buys then it will be the regular cost/benefit analysis by most shoppers.

    1. Also if they can get ideal samples so that say have great taste/higher Omega 3 levels for Salmon and perfectly marbled Wagyu with high MUFA.

      There is no perfectly marbeled Wagyu and these things can be both produced entirely artificially and distilled from existing sources with greater efficiency and better taste. What is it about futurism that makes people abjectly stupid?

  27. Stupid people say stupid things.

    Like this–

    “Instead, the industry could select cell lines from specific animals with the best traits, such as Wagyu beef [$212 per pound] or wild salmon [$25 per pound]

    What makes Wagyu beef amazing is how it’s grown. The cow’s diet, their levels of activity.

    Likewise, what makes wild salmon worth more is the wild–it’s free salmon, not farmed, not ranched, not grown in a vat on a membrane. It’s taste and texture are entirely the result of all the things that have happened to it over it’s life.

    You can’t get any of that from choosing the right DNA.

    Because what makes it Wagyu or wild isn’t IN DNA. If it were, all our farmed salmon could be marketed as ‘wild’ because, they all come from salmon that have ‘wild’ DNA at their base, right?

    1. what makes wild salmon worth more is the wild–it’s free salmon

      I’m certainly happy that those salmon are worth more because they are free. Freedom should always lead to positive valuation. I’m a bit confused though. I’d have thought that they lose the ‘free’ adjective at some point in the chain of getting caught-killed-skinned-chopped-frozen-kidnapped-transported-sold-cooked-eaten.

      Or are they worth more because they once were free and we snuffed that out?

      1. Free, as in free range.

        But I left ‘range’ out because ‘free range’ animals are farmed.

        The salmon are wild, free, there is no human hand involved in any part of their lives save the end. There is no human control over the flavor.

        Which cannot be true of vat grown salmon flesh.

        1. It should additionally be noted that Gaiaists should have at least some respect for this as it’s ‘natural’. The salmon nominally tastes as mother nature intended it to taste, as opposed to Matrix-esque mystery meat that tastes like chicken because the lab dorks can’t figure out what chicken or anything else is supposed to taste like.

      2. Nicely put this time jfree

  28. When railroading time comes you can railroad—but not before. – Heinlein

    If we were fully competent at growing extracellular structures in vitro to hold the benefits of fake meat as the pinnacle would be an insult. Sure, we *could* replace the cartilage in everyone’s joints, regrow functional ears, noses, and teeth, graft skin and muscle tissue into those that suffer from wasting diseases, and grow livers to heal the sick on a whim, but what’s all that compared to a really good side of Wagyu amiright?

    But I guess that’s the kind of fucked up moral compass you carry around with you when you’ve already accepted that lots of people have to die so that domesticated animals don’t have to suffer.

    1. grow livers to heal the sick on a whim

      FFS, actual, no-shit, oxygen and nutrient carrying blood is nowhere near as complicated as a steak and is far more valuable because of shortages and unstable supplies. The fact that many think fake meat is the key to unlocking mankinds’ moral rectitude shows just how morally fucked up the people who believe it are.

    2. But we aren’t fully competent at building cellular structures. Artificial organs means you have to be pretty much perfect at laying out a variety of cells with specialized functions, with potentially fatal consequences if you mess up. Current lab grown meat efforts don’t need to worry about the difference between most types of cells, doesn’t have to worry about getting the structure perfect, and if they get it wrong, it just messes up the texture.

      It seems to me that as lab meat companies get increasingly good at matching the texture, and eventually move on to simulating specific organs, they will make discoveries that will make lab grown organs more feasible.

      1. Plus they are not limited by matching texture. They can surpass natural texture making something more delicious.

        They can also make articidial pâté/foix gras skipping the middle step of grinding up the meat.

        1. I’ve got no problem with them making genuine lab-grown turducken (I might complain if they don’t invent cheese-filled, ranch-flavored beefpork first). My problem is with the notion that, as a moral imperative, we need to eliminate conventional meat production (which already produces artificial tissues and organs) with far-from-perfected, tissue-generation techniques that may, tangentially, enable better artificial tissues and organs. Especially to do so not because of the potential balance of lives one way or the other, but because of water or land use.

      2. You’re a bit under-informed on the technical aspects but, regardless, care to address my more critical point? If lab-grown meat has the potential to revolutionize advanced synthetic organ research, why is the big selling point, the moral imperative, to replace conventional meat production (which ***already***, as a byproduct, produces functional replacement organs and tissues)? Why is the priority the potential to save gallons of water and acres of land in the far future placed ahead of the production of gallons of blood and the saving of thousands of lives in the present? I can see no other explanation save that believers see future gallons of water as more valuable that human lives in the present. If there’s another one, I’d love to hear it, provided that you recognize that you’re effectively rebutting the argument that future water is more important than current human lives.

  29. There’s no reason you can’t promote both artificial organ growing and artificial meat growing. The two technologies complement each other, and often are the same. It’s a boon for guilt-free cannibals.

    1. There’s no reason you can’t promote both artificial organ growing and artificial meat growing.

      I agree. But, for some reason, Ron and the fake meat whackos want to promote artificial meat growing and (tentatively socialist) land and water conservation.

      1. What is socialist conservation?

  30. “The process uses 99 percent less land and 96 percent less freshwater than traditional meat production.”

    Can’t care, won’t care. There’s no way I’m eating something that comes out of a “bioreactor.”

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