School Choice

School Choice Picks Up Steam After Pandemic Closures

Unresponsive government institutions fuel state-level measures to help parents and children pick learning models that suit them.

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Among the victims of the COVID-19 pandemic we can probably count Americans' faith in government-dominated education. Through months of closures, teachers union obstinacy, and simple failure to deliver value to children, public schools have driven many families to look elsewhere for the care and feeding of young minds. The result has been rising support for school choice and a flurry of state-level measures to help parents and children pick learning models that suit them—measures that will remain long after the virus is gone.

"The Arkansas House on Wednesday narrowly approved a $2 million state income tax credit program to fund private school scholarships for needy students, sending the bill to Gov. Asa Hutchinson," the Arkansas Democrat Gazette reported on April 22. Hutchinson supports the measure, so its approval is basically guaranteed. The bill creates dollar-for-dollar income tax credits, up to a modest $2 million cap for the whole state, for donors to organizations that provide scholarships to pay for private school tuition. To qualify for those scholarships, students must have a family income equal to or less than 200 percent of the federal poverty level (currently $53,000 a year for a household with four people).

Even as Arkansas lawmakers passed the tuition tax credit plan, their counterparts in Florida approved a proposal to consolidate scholarship programs and expand eligibility to include more families.

"The Florida House voted to expand the state's school voucher programs Wednesday, opening up scholarships created to help children living in poverty to youngsters from families earning nearly $100,000 a year," according to the Orlando Sentinel.

North Carolina's House voted to expand the state's voucher program earlier this month; the measure is now in the Senate. Elected officials in Kentucky and West Virginia beat them to the punch, approving plans to let education dollars follow children to their chosen education options, rather than just funneling them to government institutions. To further illustrate where the momentum lies, West Virginia also expanded authorization for charter schools, while Kentucky lawmakers overrode Gov. Andy Beshear's veto to implement their plan. And those states are far from the full story of school choice progress.

The reason isn't difficult to discern. Public schools completely dropped the ball during the pandemic, leaving kids languishing and parents frustrated and angry.

"The pandemic has been a revelation for many Americans about union control of public schools that refuse to reopen," The Wall Street Journal's editorial board pointed out last month, before the most recent developments. "Nearly 50 school-choice bills have been introduced this year in 30 states. It's a testament to how school shutdowns have made the advantage of education choice more evident, and its need more urgent."

That's a massive turnaround from the success teachers unions enjoyed just a few years ago with their national #RedForEd strikes. They briefly had officials on the ropes with their demands for money and political power. Then they squandered their position and lots of good will by fighting to keep schools closed during the pandemic and lashing out at parents who disagree. They damaged not just their own standing, but that of the quasi-monopoly government schools that they control.

Polling supports that point. While school choice has gained ground over the years, it really picked up steam through the months of shuttered schools and idled children.

"71% of voters back school choice," the American Federation for Children announced earlier this month about the results of a recent survey. "This is the highest level of support ever recorded from major AFC national polling with a sample size above 800 voters."

"65% support parents having access to a portion of per-pupil funding to use for home, virtual, or private education if public schools don't reopen full-time for in-person classes," the organization added, noting support for exactly the sort of programs gaining ground in states including Arkansas, Florida, Kentucky, North Carolina, and West Virginia.

Even in the absence of portable education funding, families are matching their sentiments with their actions. In October, NPR found enrollment in public schools unexpectedly dropping across 20 states.

"Large and small, rich and poor, urban and rural — in most of these districts the decline is a departure from recent trends," NPR's Anya Kamenetz noted.

By contrast, enrollment in private schools, which offer options that cater to varying family preferences, held steady or increased during months of shutdowns. That flew in the face of researchers' expectations that the economic stress of the last year would have driven away families challenged to pay tuition bills.

"In our sample, 70 percent of independent schools experienced increases in enrollment or level enrollments during the pandemic recession," according to a study from Georgia's Kennesaw State University.

Publicly funded but privately managed charter schools have also largely fared well with flexible policies that suit different families.

"We understood that charter schools didn't have to follow the public schools' calendar, or its rules and regulations, and we had heard public schools may not even open," one parent told PBS's Frontline.

Government data reveals that the ranks of homeschoolers more than tripled from 3.3 percent of students before the pandemic to 11.1 percent as of the most recent information. 

"[T]he global COVID-19 pandemic has sparked new interest in homeschooling and the appeal of alternative school arrangements has suddenly exploded," observed Census Bureau researchers Casey Eggleston and Jason Fields.

Parents and children, it seems, have decided in large numbers that they want out of unresponsive government schools and eased access to education that suits their needs. Many have already made the move, and others are poised to do the same if they can extract their money from institutions they're ready to abandon. With a new flurry of school choice programs, lawmakers across the country are catching up with their constituents.

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  1. I am sure that HR1 mandatory unionization parts have nothing to do with this at all.

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  2. Parents and children, it seems, have decided in large numbers that they want out of unresponsive government schools and eased access to education that suits their needs.

    But teacher’s unions donate tons of money to Democrats so these people can get fucked. And they will be, too. Wait and see.

    1. I appreciate the Tuccille’s idealism here, but the upward trend in parents “opting out,” won’t be allowed to continue.

      The government tolerated it as long as home schoolers were a very tiny group, and could easily be labeled as nutters. The more mainstream it becomes, the more of a threat to the government interests it becomes. So, it’ll be squashed.

      As far as private schools are concerned, they have some relative freedom right now, but the government still has some reach to fuck with them. There are certain lines they have to toe, lest they find themselves under a government microscope, or regulated right out of existence.

      The democrats are working overtime to eliminate anything but the public option, and it’s ridiculous to think schools will be any different.

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    2. Teacher unions depend on member dues. Members depend on government budgets. Budgets depend on enrollment. Lower enrollment will starve the beast.

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  3. “71% of voters back school choice,” the American Federation for Children announced earlier this month about the results of a recent survey.

    “My student body, my choice!”

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  4. It is way better to attend online school and classes instead of starting school. Till all the people get vacination.

    1. Well, the shills didn’t waste any time getting here.

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    2. My kids have been in school since September and it’s been normal except for the useless masks they have to wear inside. For most young students, online instruction is vastly inferior.

    3. My kids have been in school since September and it’s been normal except for the useless masks they have to wear inside. For most young students, online instruction is vastly inferior

    4. Fuck off, Erica.

  5. And some states are doubling down on stupid, anyways:

    Virginia moving to eliminate all accelerated math courses before 11th grade as part of equity-focused plan

    Committee member Ian Shenk, who focused on grades 8-10, said: “Let me be totally clear, we are talking about taking Algebra 1, Geometry, Algebra 2 – those three courses that we’ve known and loved … and removing them from our high school mathematics program, replacing them with essential concepts for grade eight, nine, and 10.”

    1. VDOE spokesperson Charles Pyle indicated to Fox News that the courses would allow for at least some variation depending on students’ skill level. “Differentiated instruction means providing instruction that is catered to the learning needs of each child (appropriate levels of challenge and academic rigor),” Pyle said.

      Translation: They’re going to stick the bobos and the AP kids in one class, make the teacher give three different tests, and hope that the high achievers’ work ethic will rub off on the lower students.

      Or, they’re hoping that by putting the smart kids in an easier class they’ll go on autopilot, freeing the teacher up to deliver more focused instruction to the math-challenged. Regardless, it’s not going to work out well for anybody.

      1. I’ve been teaching high school science for the last 17 years (physics and chemistry, mostly). Math education in the secondary level is difficult because there is such a wide range of outcomes for students. I’ve had students that get 5’s on the AP Calc AB and BC exams, and I’ve had students that struggled to pass Algebra 1. I don’t know what the right answer is when it comes to designing curriculum for improving math achievement for all students within that entire range. Having something this radical mandated by the state for the whole state seems like an inherently bad idea, though.

        Now, I’m assuming that they didn’t just pull the idea for this out of their asses and that there is some education research backing this up. (Whether that research is quality research would be a valid question, then.) But that would just mean that it might be worth trying on a smaller scale first. You know, like what charter schools were intended to be used for before the free market purists got a hold of the idea and decided that the goal of a charter school was to provide “competition” for the evil “government” schools.

  6. Willingly sending our children to government schools is a form of child abuse.

    Government schools failure during this pandemic was just the final straw of a large load of failings. Once the pandemic pulled more parents past their inertia to consider alternatives, some are obviously choosing to stop abusing their children.

    Even that pandemic closures were unpopular with deadbeat parents that just want someone else to be forced to pay for their spawn’s daycare via government schools, despite big government schools being perpetual cesspools of diseases – maybe, uniquely, less so of C-19 – and parasites; may prove to be politically useful to wedge in school choice for better parents.

    1. “Government schools failure during this pandemic was just the final straw of a large load of failings. Once the pandemic pulled more parents past their inertia to consider alternatives, some are obviously choosing to stop abusing their children.”

      TDS-addled assholes could have voted for a POTUS who agreed with them, right TDS-addled asshole?

  7. Why don’t the just provide tax credits, up to a certain point, for families that spend money on education? Be it tutoring, tuition, education camps? Then the state isn’t in the religion debate any more than charitable giving?

    Ah, less, opportunity for graft, right.

    1. Why no education tax credits? Teacher unions.
      There was a bill that proposed to provide $1500 to special ed *public* school students in Texas; it would allow them to seek supplemental educational support outside and in addition to public school, and would not decrease the amount of public funding for schools. There were multiple lobbyists that spoke out against it, because they don’t want any funding outside the public schools.

      1. You say Teacher Union, I say Graft. Tomayto, Tomahto.

  8. This is just the beginning, the move away from public schools is going expand greatly over the next couple of years. The dims are driving public education over the cliff.

    1. Yep.

      But that’s where the reeducation camps are. So, win win.

  9. We are in a race against time to have a generation freed from essentially monopoly indoctrination of students by the government. Once they decide to return to classes, the government unions will strike back.

  10. Tuccille is right. But all those parents need do is vote for their local Libertarian Party candidates. The Looter Kleptocracy will repeal any law, cut any tax, drink any cyanide to avoid having to debate libertarians while voting to rob and kill us.

  11. When I read

    “The result has been rising support for school choice and a flurry of state-level measures to help parents and children pick learning models that suit them—measures that will remain long after the virus is gone.”

    My first question way why is anyone laboring under the delusion that the virus will ever be gone.

    1. You mean “why the powers that be will ever let the virus be gone.”

  12. Weird I know but, I think it’s a horrible idea for Private Schools to accept a penny of federal funds. Hear me now, believe me later, a few years from now the government is going to make that money contingent on some social engineering policy. That policy, whatever it is, is going to fly right in the face of that school’s core values.

    1. Oooooh……Good point.

      Signed a dad homeschooling his kid since before covid.

    2. Agreed. It’s a poison pill. That Reason is pimping this, given the well know predisposition of it’s owners towards “public-private” partnerships, tells you the Devil is in the details.

      In many ways this is an end around if state and local control.

      If the feds want to fund this then they can block grant states. Otherwise they need to get the Hell out of education.

      1. End around of…

    3. “Weird I know but, I think it’s a horrible idea for Private Schools to accept a penny of federal funds. Hear me now, believe me later, a few years from now the government is going to make that money contingent on some social engineering policy. That policy, whatever it is, is going to fly right in the face of that school’s core values.”

      Right. The school might be told that it can’t accept public money and still discriminate against gay students or even students with gay parents. Or, it might be told that it can’t discriminate against black kids and still be tax exempt, like in the old “segregation academy” days.

      1. “Right. The school might be told that it can’t accept public money and still discriminate against gay students or even students with gay parents. Or, it might be told that it can’t discriminate against black kids and still be tax exempt, like in the old “segregation academy” days.”

        Stinks of false flag. Stinks a LOT of false flag. STINKS.

    4. “Weird I know but, I think it’s a horrible idea for Private Schools to accept a penny of federal funds. Hear me now, believe me later, a few years from now the government is going to make that money contingent on some social engineering policy…”

      Can’t remember to whom the credit belongs:
      ‘If you are to sup with the devil, make sure your spoon has a long enough handle’.

  13. My Econ 101 Professor was right? A unionized monopoly is bad for the consumer? WHO WOULDA THOUGHT!!!

  14. Despite all dis most student still Download Mp3

  15. Yes you are right. During a pandemic, it is difficult to get education and this applies to the entire system. I transferred my son to another school in February so that he could get a better education. But there were also difficulties. It was necessary to pass exams and compete with other children who also decided to change schools.
    We took tests at school and had to write an essay. Essays Advisor https://essaysadvisor.com/ helped to write the best essay.

  16. Here in Arizona, we had the high pressure #Red4Ed campaign which resulted in billion dollar funding increases for schools. Fast forward a couple of years and my 70-year old sister-in-law spent most of the last year ‘virtual’ schooling her grandchildren so her son and daughter-in-law could work. I bet she, and a lot of others, wish they could have that vote back. I would like to see a referendum that makes union representation of public employees illegal. I bet that would pass right now as teachers insist on keeping schools closed or, at best, part time while ignoring ‘the science’ and collecting their full, recently increased, salaries.

    1. I don’t know about Arizona, but Florida has had almost all public schools open for in-person instruction all of this school year. Most districts gave parents options on whether to send their kids to the campus or keep them at home for live conferences with teachers and other students every day at the class’s regular time. I have been teaching in this hybrid fashion all year. Some students have been in my classroom, while others have been logging into a conference at the same time. I take attendance on those in the conference and they have to submit the same assignments and take the same tests.

      It has been a huge mess, though I wouldn’t quite say that it has been a disaster. It is not working well for most students, though. It is tremendously more work for me, as a teacher, to try and design and deliver lessons online in that fashion and to divide my attention between the few students in class and those online. Not to mention that our internet connections were simply not up to the volume of data of having all of these web conferences running at the same time every day. I quickly lost count of the times that tech issues almost wasted a whole class period or even a whole day.

      I teach physics. This is not a curriculum well suited to online learning. Online tasks can supplement what we do in person well, but I would not expect any student to be as successful at home as they could have been in class. Simulations and videos of lab experiments are not a substitute for actually manipulating equipment and making measurements, if nothing else.

      But the telling thing is that even with the option to send their kids to school, fewer than half of my students are in class, even now. It was less than a third at the beginning of the year. Reason and others on the right have been vilifying teacher’s unions in California, Chicago, and other places where unions have a lot of power for keeping schools closed, but in places like Florida, where unions have almost zero influence in state government, it is the parents keeping kids at home.

      I was fine with being at school teaching, as long as everyone was wearing masks, and reasonable efforts at social distancing were followed. 6′ may not have been necessary, but some distancing was definitely called for. It was especially the case that all classrooms needed to be evaluated, and renovated, if needed, for better ventilation. (The ‘deep cleaning’ of surfaces ended up being mostly unnecessary, but that is only known now, after more research and data is available. Just like how more data and research showed that masks for the general population really were a good idea, even though not all experts thought this was necessary at first.) I did receive automated phone calls from the school almost daily informing me of someone having tested positive, and that included students. So, the pandemic was always a real concern, that required serious efforts to keep people as safe as possible.

      Ultimately, the issue of the pandemic and schools was overly politicized at both ends. Politics in the U.S. have failed because it is clear that all of our political institutions and media have placed winning, ratings, and money ahead of actually serving people. Leaders “whip up the base” rather than actually showing any leadership. The media feeds people what will keep them watching rather than what will inform them. Money rules the day all around, whether it is media companies searching for viewers, clicks, and other sources of ad revenue, politicians looking to raise money from supporters by convincing them that only they can save the country or big donors that want to protect their business interests, and businesses looking to protect their profits. We’ve lost the ability to set aside political differences to serve the greater good. And as tempting as it is to blame the other side for that, we should all start by looking in the mirror. We can only affect our own behavior, so start with that.

      1. “…I have been teaching in this hybrid fashion all year…”
        First clue; we got a teachers’ union shill right here.

        “…It is tremendously more work for me, as a teacher, to try and design and deliver lessons online in that fashion and to divide my attention between the few students in class and those online…”
        While getting paid for your 9-month year. Boo, hoo.

        “…Reason and others on the right have been vilifying teacher’s unions in California, Chicago, and other places where unions have a lot of power for keeping schools closed, but in places like Florida, where unions have almost zero influence in state government, it is the parents keeping kids at home…”
        Shill finds Reason ‘on the right’, claims parents are art fault absent evidence.

  17. People should read the Orlando Sentinel article that Tuccille linked about Florida’s bill to consolidate and expand its voucher program. It provides more information that school choice advocates are not telling people. Namely, the complete lack of accountability in Florida’s voucher programs. Readers could also benefit from the more complete investigative reporting series from the Orlando Sentinel, “Schools without Rules” that dives deep into the voucher system in the state.

    “Accountability is provided by the parents making the choices”, they might counter. But that would assume that parents have the information they need to make wise choices. Voucher students in Florida are not required to take the same state tests that public school students do (note that charters are public schools and those kids do take the same tests other public school students take). The schools can choose from among many tests (almost 20) to have the voucher students take them.

    “They are still taking tests”, the voucher advocates might then say. But the results of those tests are not published. They are sent to a university research group that collects and analyzes the data, but those reports are aimed at the public, but just generated to satisfy a weak legislative requirement. The legislature has shown no interest in the actual results.

    Most of these voucher schools are quite small, but 418 out of 1,546, or 27 percent — that had at least 30 scholarship students in the grades that must take standardized tests. The Florida State University researchers that receive this data found that of the campuses with “statistically significant” scores, about 66 percent of them posted negative “gain scores,” meaning during the past three years their students fell backward in reading or math or both.

    As for how parent choice factors into things, one point to note is the high rate at which students leave the program after only one or two years and return to regular public schools. (It was 61% in one recent report.) Also of note is the degree to which it is a myth that parents are using these vouchers to “escape” “failing” public schools. Nearly a third of students new to the program had never been in a regular public school, and 40% of those that had been were coming from schools that the state rated as “A” or “B” schools. Only 16% were coming from “D” or “F” schools.

    A big factor seems to be religion, as well. For many parents, the main draw seems to be that the schools they will send their kids to teach them religion. So, with other posters worrying about how Virginia public schools might be dumbing down their secondary math curriculum, are they also worried about kids being taught that dinosaurs lived alongside humans before the Flood in some private Christian schools with public money? One gay student testified to a legislative committee about having escaped bullying at a public school by going to a private school through a voucher, but what about the 150+ voucher-accepting schools that ban gay students or even students with gay parents?

    Florida, under Jeb! Bush, pioneered the “accountability” measures for public schools that are now standard throughout the country. But they don’t want any accountability for their voucher program. They don’t even want the parents making these choices to have the information that public schools must collect and make available for them to make informed choices.

    1. Fuck off slaver.

      1. Such a devastating logical argument. I am put in my place.

    2. It’s good that we have people like you around to remind us that the stupid public can’t figure things out without you.

      1. “It’s good that we have people like you around to remind us that the stupid public can’t figure things out without you.”

        Your comment has absolutely no relation to what I wrote. My whole point is that the “public” isn’t being offered the information they would need to make their own decisions. It isn’t about me telling them what to think or that they are “stupid”. The libertarian/conservative school choice side is not offering the information about the private school choices that the public deserves. The whole school choice debate from its advocates is centered around political narratives, not an objective analysis of facts. I choose to believe that people can make good decisions and understand complex issues, but they need the information to do that. And they need to recognize when they are being sold a story rather than the truth. I have no desire to substitute my judgement for theirs, but I will work to get them the information they need to make sound judgements. The Reason authors that talk about public education don’t do that. They are serving an ideological agenda.

        If you have anything at all to say that would counter the facts and arguments I have made, then please share. Use available facts and your reasoning ability to show that school choice is the way to go. If all you have are charges that I have bad motivations or some sort of “elitist” arrogance, then I can only assume that you don’t have any facts or reasoned arguments to support school choice against what I have to say.

        1. Fuck off slaver.

          1. (your lack of self awareness, even when prodded, does nothing but reinforce your obvious libertarian deficiencies)

            1. Is telling me to fuck off supposed to prod me into self awareness? Is that some strategy you got from How to Win Friends and Influence People? Oh, wait. I’m pretty sure that Dale Carnegie suggested doing the opposite of that.

              As for my “libertarian deficiencies”: One of the benefits of not subscribing to any ideology is that I don’t worry about whether my thinking is “deficient” in that ideology’s narrow requirements. I can focus on reasoning through a specific problem according to the evidence that is relevant to that problem. I don’t then have to wonder if I am going to be judged as incorrect according to a predetermined answer that some ideologues declare to be correct. Well, I might still wonder what ideologues might come out of the woodwork and tell me that I’m a “slaver” for disagreeing with their orthodoxy, but I certainly won’t care.

              To use the only language that you seem to understand, I don’t give two fucks about what libertarian ideology is regarding education. If libertarians can’t explain why certain policies are correct without relying on the assumption that their ideology is correct, then what they are saying is going to have no impact on anyone not libertarian or at least sympathetic to that worldview. That makes their arguments a waste of breath outside of right-wing circles.

              If you libertarians want to engage in circle jerks and pronounce how much better than the Marxists you are, then go for it. But don’t expect to be persuasive to anyone near the middle. Be happy with being less than 5% of the voting population and only having any influence at all with the 20-30% of the voting population that are revanchist conservatives that will only use your ideas when it suits them. They clearly abandon any pretense of following libertarian ideals when those ideals would restrict their options to obtain what they really want.

              People can either make their own arguments, or they can let the thought leaders of some ideology do their thinking for them. I prefer to do my own thinking.

              1. You pointed out people left voucher schools that did not satisfy the parents. That’s the one thing you cannot do with nearly all public schools, and that is why vouchers are superior.

                1. “You pointed out people left voucher schools that did not satisfy the parents.”

                  This has been typical of my experience here. You think that you only need to find one tiny chink in the armor of my argument to deliver a fatal blow, so you only address that one small thing and ignore everything else. So let’s go with this. Sure, some parents figured out that the private schools that they picked were serving their children poorly. But after how much lost time did they realize this and pull their kids? Why didn’t they have the information that would have told them that the school would do a poor job before they ever sent their kids there? And I suppose you are perfectly fine with schools that do a poor job educating kids as long as the parents are choosing those schools. For instance, maybe they think it is better for their kids to be in a religious school with weak academics than to be in a better public school that does not teach kids to follow the parents’ religious beliefs.

                  If vouchers are inherently superior to regular public education, then why the complete lack of public accountability? Why are these private schools in Florida able to continue taking public money after they’ve been caught submitting safety inspection reports with forged signatures? After hiring people with criminal records? Read those reports I’ve been mentioning. If you won’t do that, then why are you so convinced that you’re right and I’m wrong?

  18. Damn the lack of edit. Paragraph three should say, “those reports are NOT aimed at the public”

  19. The education system has changed a lot. And this applies not only to schoolchildren but also to teachers. I was out of work. And for me it was a shock. I was looking for a job for two months. There are few vacancies, and the competition is very large.
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  20. I’d like to repeat my libertarian big government public school reform proposal:
    Take 10% out of the current public schools budget and set aside for incentives paid directly to the parents of children in the schools. Pay the top 20% of students by standardized tests, and pay for students improving their math and/or reading test scores by 5 percentage points.

    In a system like say Baltimore, where they are spending 16,000 per pupil and getting nothing for their money it certainly wouldn’t hurt. Better than flushing it down the same old rathole they currently are.

    1. I don’t see what is “libertarian” about this proposal. It looks like wealth transfer to me. Give parents extra taxpayer money for doing what they should already be doing anyway for their own best interest and the best interests of their children?

      You make some allowances for the different obstacles for success that different children will face, when you suggest paying for students that show gains as well as those that score high overall. That, at least, acknowledges that the goal is to improve and grow, rather than just to be at the top, since “success” in life doesn’t have to be graduating from a top university. Grow to one’s own greatest potential is a perfectly honorable and worthy goal, whether that potential is to be one of the ‘elite’ of business, science, or similar profession, or whether it is simply to have a steady, productive job and provide for one’s own family as an adult.

      The biggest problem with your proposal is that standardized tests are a tool, not an end of their own. Far too much importance is placed on them as it is.

      1. Busted you the first time you posted your lefty shit hypothetical, asshole.
        Fuck off and die; let your dog piss on your remains.

      2. BTW, I’d taken some of your shill-whine apart above, but it’s tiresome and not really worth my effort.
        You’re a union-entitled, government employee, trying like hell to defend the failure which is government schools. There is not a single argument you whine above which has not been demolished many times in the past.
        Here is a proper response:
        Fuck off and die, slaver.

        1. “BTW, I’d taken some of your shill-whine apart above, but it’s tiresome and not really worth my effort.”

          I think the world would better off if you’d decide that saying anything to anyone isn’t worth your effort.

  21. Parents and children, it seems, have decided in large numbers that they want out of unresponsive government schools and eased access to education that suits their needs.
    But teacher’s unions donate tons of money to Democrats so these people can get fucked. And they will be, too. Wait and see. Knowledgesight

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  25. For months, parents and educators have worried about whether or not schools will be able to reopen safely this fall amid the COVID-19 pandemic. State and local officials have struggled to balance competing priorities and answer complicated logistical, educational, and public health questions. For the safety of students, families, and educators, science must drive these decisions. Yet recently, President Donald Trump began a politically driven pressure campaign to force schools to physically reopen across the country. Over the past several months, the Trump administration should have been providing resources and assistance to local leaders that would help them implement social distancing, provide personal protective equipment, and plan for a safe reopening.
    To know more about reopening schools safely, read https://www.eduhealthsystem.com/blog/covid-19-what-to-know-before-sending-kids-back-to-school/

  26. Pick up the phone. Call any elected official in your state, democrat or other wise and tell them they’ll not get your vote if they oppose school choice in any way.

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