Second Amendment

The Police Tactics That Caused Breonna Taylor's Death Should Infuriate Second Amendment Advocates

Heavy-handed police raids are trampling on the basic rights of all Americans.

|

Gun-rights groups understandably are upset that a Louisiana public school punished a fourth-grade student after a teacher saw a BB gun in the boy's bedroom during a video classroom session. That was an absurd case of political correctness, given that the gun merely was in the background. It reflects infuriating anti-gun bias.

Now contrast many gun activists' reaction—or apparent lack thereof—to a more significant gun-related issue that grabbed headlines the same week. A grand jury in Louisville gave a wrist slap to officers who killed Breonna Taylor during a raid at her home. The African-American medical worker hadn't done anything wrong. The drug-related warrant, which spurred the raid, apparently involved her former boyfriend.

I scoured the internet and found little outrage from gun-rights groups and supporters. Yet the Taylor case—as well as the issue of police raids and police militarization, in general—poses a real risk to Americans' Second Amendment rights. They also pose risks to our other constitutional rights, such as protection against government searches and seizures, and the requirement for due process.

Heavily armed, black-clad SWAT officers conduct thousands of these raids each year, with many of them botched and some even taking place at the wrong address. As The New York Times recently explained, Taylor and her boyfriend, Kenneth Walker, were in bed and heard banging. Police say that they announced themselves before busting down the door with a battering ram, but Walker said he didn't hear that announcement—and feared the intruder was Taylor's ex-boyfriend.

Walker fired his gun, hitting a sergeant in the thigh. One officer reportedly fired 10 rounds blindly into the apartment, while others fired five rounds at Taylor, killing her. Dispatch logs suggest the officers waited 20 minutes before providing medical assistance to Taylor. Police found no drugs in the apartment, according to the family lawyer. The grand jury indicted one officer for "wanton endangerment," but filed no charges against the others. One officer was fired.

Authorities dropped attempted-murder charges against Walker, but they typically file such charges against citizens who use firearms when the intruders turn out to be officers.

"In theory, no-knock raids are supposed to be used in only the most dangerous situations," per a 2015 Vox report. "In reality, though, no-knock raids are a common tactic, even in less-than-dangerous circumstances." It noted that 80 percent of them involve the execution of a simple search warrant. (A judge had issued a no-knock warrant in the Taylor raid, even though it later was amended to a knock-and-announce warrant.)

Gun-rights supporters argue correctly that Americans should be free to own firearms to protect themselves. When the government employs these police-state tactics, how can you reasonably know that the people plowing through your door aren't criminals who want to kill your family? In my view, such raids—whether "no knock" or "knock and announce"—also pose a grave risk to Americans' Second Amendment protections (as well as to police who conduct them).

The late San Jose police chief, Joe McNamara, worried that police agencies increasingly send SWAT teams to homes to deal with relatively minor incidents if they suspect that the person owns a firearm. With California's reporting system, any gun owner could be subject to a SWAT raid solely because they have availed themselves of this legal right. After all, it's easy for the authorities to know if you own a weapon.

During a 2018 hearing about proposed gun restrictions at the Maryland House of Delegates, one gun-rights advocate told USA Today, "The Second Amendment is not about hunting. It is not about competitive shooting. The Second Amendment is about self-defense. It's about being able to stop people who would do you harm, whether that's a criminal or the government."

Gun-rights supporters are on point with this argument, which one can easily confirm by perusing the Founding Fathers' statements about gun ownership. Yet in most of these police-shooting cases, the loudest Second Amendment supporters go silent. Few of them issued any substantive comment after a Minnesota police officer in 2016 shot to death Philandro Castile, who had told the officer he had a licensed firearm in his possession.

The fundamental problem is rooted in the nation's endless drug war, which in turn has led police agencies to behave more militaristically. "Simply put, the police culture has changed," wrote McNamara in a 2006 Wall Street Journal column. "An emphasis on 'officer safety' and paramilitary training pervades today's policing, in contrast to the older culture, which held that cops didn't shoot until they were about to be shot or stabbed."

Racial disparities certainly matter, but I believe that cultural change is the impetus for ongoing police-brutality protests. Those Americans who support the right to private firearms ownership—and the groups that claim to speak for us—need to speak out about this threat to our liberties. Quite frankly, it's a far bigger problem than schools that foolishly suspend kids for having a BB gun within view of the video camera.

This column was first published in The Orange County Register.

NEXT: Today in Supreme Court History: October 9, 1954

Editor's Note: We invite comments and request that they be civil and on-topic. We do not moderate or assume any responsibility for comments, which are owned by the readers who post them. Comments do not represent the views of Reason.com or Reason Foundation. We reserve the right to delete any comment for any reason at any time. Report abuses.

  1. “The Second Amendment is not about hunting. It is not about competitive shooting. The Second Amendment is about self-defense. It’s about being able to stop people who would do you harm, whether that’s a criminal or the government.”

    ^^^This

    1. I have received $17634 last month from home by working online in my part time. I am a full time student Abq and doing this easy home based work for 3 to 4 hrs a day. FVG.This job is very simple to do and its regular earnings are much better than any other office type work.
      See detail here…………Visit Here

    2. This isn’t the first time that “no-knock” raids have wound up killing innocent people, or cops. The whole tactic should be abolished.

      A far smarter tactic would be to quietly surround the building the suspects are in, knock on the door repeatedly until you get a reaction from whoever is inside, announce yourselves and demand that the door be opened. If the suspects try to escape out the back door or a window, the police waiting there can catch them with stun-batons and stun-shields. If the suspects try to shoot through the door, *then* knock the door down and come after them — again, with stun-shields, stun-batons, and wireless Tasers. A good 90% of “police brutality” cases could be prevented by adequate use of (and training with) stun-weapons.

    3. I am now making extra $19k or more every month from home by doing very simple and easy job online from home. I have received exactly $20845 last month from this home job. Join now this jobws and start making extra cash online by follow instruction on the given website………Click here

  2. Just because I haven’t been burning buildings down for four months doesn’t mean I’m not infuriated. It just means that I don’t think burning buildings down is right or even a productive way to fix problems.

    1. Also, it will be a bittersweet moment of “I told you so” when the wrist-slapped police officers in the Breonna Taylor killing are actually convicted and the officers involved in the George Floyd killing walk off scot-free.

      1. I have received $17634 last month from home by working online in my part time. I am a full time student and doing this easy home based work for 3 to 4 hrs a day. vbv.This job is very simple to do and its regular earnings are much better than any other office type work.
        See detail here…………Money90

        1. Corona is big threat of the century which effect physically, mentally and financially/ JOB To over come these difficulties and make full use of this hostage period and make online earning.
          For more detail visit the given link…………► More Inforemaion

      2. The cop being released on bail and allowed to leave the state is insane. Then there’s the cop in Texas that shot a guy in the back, charged with first degree murder, which is a death penalty case, released on bail! Gee, a death penalty case, ya think he might flee????

  3. It all goes back to the War on Drugs. Absent that great stupidity, most of the reason for no-knock military-style raids goes away.

    1. Maybe. But if we did not have a war on drugs, we would have wars on speech, gender, race, pornography, CO2, property rights, diet, and a thousand other ideologies where at least one side presumes a righteous mandate to control society. Too many humans desire to rule and/or submit to the rulers. The exception that at least used to define the essence of the US is the concept that people should not be ruled. Statists who want to stamp out the basic concept of individual liberty are the ultimate cause of police raids.

    2. It also goes back to the fact that, since it’s founding, the United States, as a society and a culture, has depended upon and revolved around the gun from the beginning, and it’s come home to roost in many more ways than one. The fact that so many cops are too trigger happy and willingly kin without thinking twice, especially people of color, is one excellent of that. So’s the fact that the United States, as a country, has the highest murder rate by firearms per capita in the Western Hemisphere.

      1. The highest murder rate in the Western Hemisphere?

        LMAO. Have you been drinking?

        Aside from Canada and a few tiny Caribbean islands, the US has the LOWEST murder rate in the Western Hemisphere.

        1. The US is essentially tied with Kazakhstan, Cuba, Kenya, and Angola. We should be so proud of being in such auspicious company.

  4. But if we handcuff police by not allowing them any leeway in randomly shooting people they think might pose a threat to them, how are the police going to defend us from bad people? You have a choice to make – either allow the police to operate as dangerous armed gangs who feel free to ignore the law or face dangerous armed gangs who feel free to ignore the law. Choose wisely.

    1. Since both options are effectively “face dangerous armed gangs who feel free to ignore the law”, I’m going to go with the option where it’s not a crime to shoot back.

    2. “…leeway in randomly shooting people they think might pose a threat to them…”

      When that applies to the average citizen first, then you can let cops do it. The government doesn’t get to do it before the citizens can. That’s the way it should be, full stop.

    3. Shooting at someone who just shot you in the leg is not “randomly shooting people.”

      1. Shooting wildly into an apartment and having 5 bullets enter the apartment across the hall and 3 enter the apartment above is about as close to “randomly shooting people” as you can get without actually hitting somebody.

    4. Give the police stun-weapons — stun-shields, hand-held stun-guns, stun-batons and wireless Tasers — and train them extensively in the use thereof. Keep the actual firearms locked in the patrol cars as a last resort.

  5. I scoured the internet and found little outrage from gun-rights groups and supporters.

    Links to:

    1. NRA board member and former Georgia Republican congressman Bob Barr argued that the “riots” had “nothing to do with the death of George Floyd,” insisting that if they did, protesters “would have backed down as soon as the indictment of former police officer Derek Chauvin was announced.”

      Barr said he didn’t sympathize with protesters because they were not themselves “victims of individual or group injustice of the sort that befell Floyd” and argued that antifa activists had “hijacked the George Floyd murder … for purposes having nothing whatsoever to do with seeking justice for his death.”

      1. Sounds about right.

        Anyone who actually cares about this should be distancing themselves from BLM as fast as possible.

      2. Which doesn’t address the topic. Like, at all.

        Ultimately, forced entry raids, no-knock or not, are not compatible with the second amendment, particularly in Castle Doctrine states. They are at odds, and actively create situations where multiple parties can rightfully claim self defense.

        Any homeowner should be able to defend his home, regardless of whether “POLICE!” is yelled out or not. Someone yelling “POLICE!” can be anyone.

        Police, while performing their jobs (particularly under the authority of a judge), absolutely have the right to shoot if they’re in imminent danger, and no one could rightly argue that being shot at doesn’t meet that meet that threshold.

        Which is why gun advocacy groups should be up in arms about forced raid entry tactics, but they aren’t.

        You cannot logically support both forced raid entry and gun rights. Yet by NOT speaking out against forced raid entry as a policy, and instead rushing to the defense of the police officers and castigating rioting tries to attempt that bit of intellectual gymnastics.

        Until gun advocacy groups speak out against forced entry raids and put gun rights above cop suckery, this complaint against them can and should exist.

        1. This is how idiots think gun rights groups think.
          Proper gun safety says you don’t shoot until you identify your target, and one in uniform and wearing a badge is not a target you can claim self defense against.
          Even plain clothed police officers wear their badge visible, if for no other reason than to make sure fellow officers, who may not know them will not shoot at them.

      3. Barr is an elitist who doesn’t identify with the public or understand rights. When one person has rights violated, all of us are violated, in principle, and could be next. When people are constantly victims of police abuse, but don’t react, the anger builds up, and finally it explodes into an over reaction. Others who have political agendas use the anger to cover their actions. People forget the original source of the anger was police violence, abuse. That should be the focus for change.

  6. When the left wishes to implement red flag laws, we are assured it’s ok because the orders are reviewed by a judge.

    Yet these are the same judges who sign off on the no knock raids they wish to eliminate.

    1. Yeah, who would have foreseen that the tactics used to catch terrorists and child molesters would filter down to catching drug dealers and buyers to catching regular people exercising their constitutional rights?

    2. Remember how upset Greenhut was when it was Trump associates getting the 3 AM treatment?

      Yeah, me neither.

      1. As I have never met him, I have never had any insight into how upset he is at any given time.

        Are you suggesting that means he was OK with it?

        1. I’m not suggesting anything. But what if I was?

          Greenhut appears to have expressed no outrage over those outrages.

          It’s called an observation.

          Why do you have a problem with that?

          1. I make up to $90 an hour on-line from my home. My story is that I give up operating at walmart to paintings on-line and with a bit strive I with out problem supply in spherical $40h to $86h… someone turned into top to me by way of manner of sharing this hyperlink with me, so now i’m hoping i ought to help a person else accessible through sharing this hyperlink…

            ============► Click here

  7. Walker shot through the door at the police before they entered. What would you expect them to do?

    1. Ah yes…

      “I felt threatened, it was a dangerous situation!”
      “A dangerous situation that you were wholly responsible for creating.”
      “Well, yes, but if you ignore that part, I was the real victim!”

    2. That would be a relevant comment if there were any evidence that it were true. Instead, we have the tape of the 911 call that Walker made as his apartment was being broken in to and before he fired any shots.

      What I expect the police to do is:
      a) don’t lie to the judge when preparing your warrant application
      b) when serving the warrant, double-check that you’re at the right address before breaking in
      c) unless there are extenuating circumstances (and there weren’t here), conduct searches during the day when the subjects will be awake and aware
      d) again, unless there are extenuating circumstances, knock and wait for someone to come to the door, then hand over the warrant and give the person a chance to read it before barging in
      e) if they have a dog, give them a reasonable opportunity to move the dog to a place that will ensure everyone’s safety
      f) fire every instructor, subordinate leader or vendor that talks about the “warrior mentality” for policing.

      1. Well said.

        Breaking into a home in the dead of night puts lives in danger. So can only be justified when there is reasonable certainty that lives are already in danger.

        To do so under any other circumstances is unsupportable regardless of where you stand on the 2A.

      2. Nobody on this thread gives any credence to a grand jury. I know more than most because I read the transcript of recorded calls and the gps record of the perps car. The drugs were found hanging in a tree in a third house, not Breonnas, not the drop house. Of course I agree that taking a bit of meth and fentynal off the street won’t change anything, but I hate to think what would happen if people could volunteer for that rabid animal condition any time they like.

      3. In other words, largely ban forced entry raids except in immediate danger circumstances. Active shooter situations. Hostage situations. The like.

        If there is no imminent danger, there should be exactly zero forced entry raids.

      4. It was not before Taylor’s apartment was broken into, it was after that he made the 911 call. After Breonna had been shot as well.

        I wholly agree with a-f.

    3. He was going to answer the door when they knocked the door off its hinges, and then he fired one round at the first guy through. Hankison, the cop who was indicted, was the one firing blindly, directing ten rounds through a curtained window, some of which went into at least one other apartment. Facts matter.

      What would I expect them to do? Not be at my door at 1 am.

    4. “What would you expect them to do?”

      How about a strategic retreat, as a state aggressor, as opposed to blindly firing into a dwelling with so many unknowns and nearby neighbors just to perpetuate the slavishly submit or die doctrine. How do reckless gunfights increase officer safety?

      Stop lying about Walker shooting through the door which is irrelevant anyway. Walker also claims to have loudly asked who was attempting to break in to identify themselves but got no response.

      You can bet any of the 3 Little Pigs would have shot the big bad wolf while he was huffing and puffing to blow their houses in too.

  8. “Walker shot through the door at the police before they entered. What would you expect them to do?”

    It doesn’t matter. They had a garbage excuse to be there in the first place.

    1. Exactly! It doesn’t matter if they did not have a lawful pretext to be there.

      And just for the record Presskh, walker did not shoot through the door by all accounts. He shot Mattingly in the leg after they breached the door, and without announcing “police” according to the preponderance of evidence. .

  9. This article reads like you wrote it months ago based on false assertions prevalent in the left-wing media at the time, and were too lazy to update it, so you just watered down false assertions to “A” makes me think of “B” type statements.

    1. You falsely link this incident to no-knock raids, which this wasn’t.
    2. You falsely link this incident to a case of mistaken identity, which this wasn’t.

    Yes, no-knock raids should be curtailed, but this wasn’t such a raid, and so can’t function as a data point in an argument for that proposition. And the primary problem with such raids is a potential violation of the 4th, not the 2nd Amd.

    “Why come the NRA no cry about Breonna Taylor more?!” is a shitty premise for an article.

    1. which this wasn’t
      If you knock gently at one in the morning seconds before using the battering ram does that really count? The point of knocking is to give residents the chance to end the encounter peacefully. If the police wanted a peaceful resolution they could have come to the house at some other time of day when the residents were more likely to be awake or they could have taken steps to awaken the residents (they have loudspeakers/bullhorns). It’s painfully clear that the cops didn’t want that though. They were angling for a dramatic guns-drawn raid with maximum intimidation.

      1. In a situation involving a suspected technical violation like this, why couldn’t they have just mailed a summons?

        1. What technical violation? Or are we just ignoring her continued involvement with the criminal enterprise raided that night? Facts matter unless there is a narrative to support isn’t just for team red/blue it seems.

    2. I’d recommend Radley Balko’s work on this. He cites a scholar who rode along on something like 60 raids by LMPD, and there was very little distinction, intentionally, between how they handled regular warrant service and no-knock.

      1. No-knock or knock and bust in isn’t the distinction that should be made. That’s largely irrelevant, especially in the dead of night.

        Forced entry raids is the point. Get rid of them all except for imminent danger situations.

    3. no link to no-knock raids? The initial warrant issued was for a no-knock raid. And, as pointed out below, if you “announce” while people are asleep or too far away to hear, it is functionally the same as not knocking and announcing.

    4. It was a no knock raid according to the full meaning of a no-knock raid.

      Yes they did knock and bang on the door.

      But, according to Walker and 11 of 12 neighbors, no one heard the police identify themselves. The twelfth one said he heard them say police once.

      The prime requisite is that they make clear that they are the police. Banging on the door could be anybody, including the drug dealing friend of Breonna that Walker feared.

      There was no criminal record for either Taylor or Walker and there was nothing illegal in the house. Walker had just been hired for a job at USPS. Therefore, Walker had no motivation or reason to shoot at the police if he had known they were police. The 911 transcript indicates he still did not know it was the police who shot at them. Walker’s fear and crying while walking out to police also support that he would not knowingly shoot at police.

      All this plus a record of 5 of the police officers involved botching a must-knock warrant just over

      1. 5 of the police officers in this warrant also botched a must-knock warrant just over a year before in which they didn’t bother to check who the occupants were, and who were not the right people, and in which they announced “Police! Search warrant!” at the exact moment they rammed the door.

  10. Reasonettes continue to pretend not to know that the “modern” NRA (which now seems to be falling apart) was the result of the black riots of the sixties. White Americans rushed to “defend themselves”–defend themselves against black people. Nick Gillespie and others have pointed out that the NRA and other 2nd amendment buffs seem to ignore 2nd amendment violations when they affect black people, but just can’t figure out why. It’s because people who post pictures of themselves with AK-47s and ammo belts wrapped around their shoulders are, 9 times out of 10, racists. Get a clue, y’all.

    1. Even assuming that is all true, why does it matter what color the riots were? Seems like a pretty good reason for people of all races to think that perhaps they should be better prepared to defend themselves. I bet that black people who actually lived where the riots were were even more acutely aware of the value of being able to defend yourself against rioters.
      I’m sure some of the people joining the NRA were motivated by racism, but I see no reason to assume it was a primary factor.

      1. The 1968 gun control act was the main reason.

        1. Kenny Ballew tried to defend himself from a home invasion with a Walker Colt. He was never charged with anything and the warrant was based off a “tip” from a burglar.

          https://www.sfgate.com/nation/article/How-the-NRA-became-ATF-s-biggest-enemy-4950703.php

      2. It’s not “a primary factor”, or any factor at all. Alan is regurgitating far-left anti-NRA talking points that have no basis in fact.

    2. ‘It’s because people who post pictures of themselves with AK-47s and ammo belts wrapped around their shoulders are, 9 times out of 10, racists.’ Based on what evidence? ‘2nd amendment buffs seem to ignore 2nd amendment violations when they affect black people.’ Ditto.

    3. This is the first comment I’ve seen in this thread that I think gets to the root of the problem: Those who are silent don’t think this could happen to them because they are white.

    4. 9 out of 10 are racists?

      You obviously do not believe in having a clue yourself.

      Most people are defending Taylor and Walker so you do not even have a point in the first place apparently.

  11. Greenhut wasted too many words. Breonna was shot because she was black. It is known.

  12. “The Police Tactics That Caused Breonna Taylor’s Death Should Infuriate Second Amendment Advocates”

    Um…no. Infuriate is not the correct word. The correct word would be “justify”, or “support”, or “validate”.

    Infuriate? no, not at all. Just nod and spend a bit more to install further physical reinforcement to the doors so they can’t be readily knocked-in. Which all responsible citizens should have as well as the means to defend their castle from any trespass.

    1. This is the dumbest take on the topic I have read to date. I have the right not to have my door kicked in even if it is a mesh-screen door.

      Moreover, it won’t help, since the police are happy to blow up the walls if they feel like it: https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2019/10/31/colorado-town-not-liable-damages-police-destroy-man-home-court/4108163002/

  13. No mention that this might have something to do with racism. If this was some militia guy in Idaho it would have probably sparked an uprising. Also, the 2nd amendment crowd is placed in an awkward position between themselves that thin blue line they are supposedly supporting. If we all have guns the police are forced to become more and more aggressive to accomplish their tasks. It’s tough to constantly go back and forth seeing cops as heroes and then tyrants. Are the FBI deep state agents or hero cops? Is your local sheriff on the take or a hero?

    1. “Also, the 2nd amendment crowd is placed in an awkward position between themselves that thin blue line they are supposedly supporting.”

      you are confusing and conflating two very separate topics. There is no issue supporting fair law enforcement grounded in protection of constitutionally protected rights and recognizing that “ACAB” is an appalling generalization of LEOs that serves no good purpose -and- believing that a responsible citizen should be able to defend their life and property against any violation. Actually, the two go hand-in-hand as LEOs in heavily armed rural areas tend to be very polite and respectful to their fellow citizens and often work to resolve issues with as little conflict as possible.

      1. There is no issue supporting fair law enforcement grounded in protection of constitutionally protected rights and recognizing that “ACAB” is an appalling generalization of LEOs that serves no good purpose -and- believing that a responsible citizen should be able to defend their life and property against any violation.

        Except that LEOs see “able to defend their life and property against any violation” as grounds for being shot.

        Police don’t like limits on their authority, citizenry that can rebuff or evade them, or even constitutional non-compliance. This is true whether you’re talking about guns, cryptography, or just “I want a lawyer, dawg”.

        They also don’t like responsibility, which is why there is no consequence for them watching a person die and doing nothing about it, ignoring crimes in progress, not responding to calls, and so-on.

        Remember: “Protect and serve” is propaganda, not policy.

        1. These are gross generalization that do not apply to the majority of LEOs, particularly in smaller communities, rural areas, and red-states.
          Yes, there is a big issue with LEOs understanding of “protect and serve” and a lot of work to do to fix the problematic trends.
          But, there are two very different worlds of LEO-to-populace interactions between deep-blue urban areas and purple/red surburban-rural areas. I can’t refute a racial element, but strongly believe it is driven by the absurd levels of political corruption in the higher-ups. It’s provides a perverse crony-protection/thin-blue-line political leverage counter to justice that doesn’t exist to nearly the same degree outside of these high density urban centers.

    2. No mention that this might have something to do with racism. If this was some militia guy in Idaho it would have probably sparked an uprising.

      Or it might have had to do with any number of other factors. Where is the evidence that racism was a significant factor? You are aware that this happens to white people as well, right?

      1. No, no.
        Don’t you realize that any interaction between white people and black people, that have a negative outcome for a black person is racially motivated.
        It is never the other way around and black people, who become cops, or express conservative ideas, become white.
        Get your woke facts straight.

  14. Anyone concerned with the right of citizens to be secure in their homes should be upset at low or no knock search warrants being violently served in the dead of the night.

    But no enemies to the left eh, Greenhut?

    1. I agree and, propose a Test. Have Police Officers randomly get a no-knock raid in the middle of the night. Let’s see how ‘highly-trained’ Individuals handle these occasions. That would give useful data on these raids.

  15. “Few of them issued any substantive comment after a Minnesota police officer in 2016 shot to death Philandro Castile, who had told the officer he had a licensed firearm in his possession.”

    Greenhut is regurgitating proggy anti-gun/anti-NRA talking points here. The NRA, as policy, does not comment on specific cases. To point to them not defending Castile is BS, because they don’t get involved in any specific case. They are a lobbying organization and only address court cases and government positions.
    And to add to the disingenous nature of the point, the gun-community was very vocally supportive of Castile and against the office in that situation. It’s just the the proggy MSM ignores everything other then their favorite boogyman, then NRA.

    1. Then what they need to address is the policy of forced entry raids, and how forced entry raids and the 2A are not compatible with each other.

  16. Not sure where you scoured the internet, but in the 2A sites and forums I hang out in, we’ve been screaming about this case since we first heard of it. We were also first (and still, I think, loudest) to decry Philando Castile’s death, but nobody seems to want to chant his name either.

    There’s a lot of overlap between 2A and Republicans, for sure, but most of us are small-L libertarians more concerned about the government sending plain-clothed police into our homes at 3am to kill us more than we’re concerned about, as they mock, “Mah gunz”

    1. […] but most of us are small-L libertarians more concerned about the government sending plain-clothed police into our homes at 3am to kill us more than we’re concerned about, as they mock, “Mah gunz”

      Which is why, of course, I hear far more about “we need to vote for X to stop 2 AM raids for non-emergency warrants” then “we need to vote Republican to stop Biden from stealing our guns”.

    2. (…but nobody seems to want to chant his name (Philando Castille) either.”

      Why would they when those opposed can use the plethora of activist generated flimsy, false or unsympathetic claims to discredit victims and the general concern about police tyranny. Voila’ there is no problem except all of the unhinged anti-cop citizens that fail to appreciate how lucky they are to be so safe.

      Activists are often their own worst enemy by choosing poor cases instead of remaining focused on the solid ones.

      Daniel Shaver, anyone?

    3. But many of the cases were not really about 2A rights. So many cops-shooting-unarmed-people tilts the scales such that cases like Castille and Taylor are *far* less about their guns than they are about inept cops. Similarly, in my mind, many of these cases are far far less about racism than they are about inept cops demanding to be OBEYED. E.g., Daniel Shaver was white and unarmed, but the sick cop who demanded that he OBEY contradictory orders shot him anyway.

  17. ●▬▬▬▬PART TIME JOBS▬▬▬▬▬●my co-employee’s ex-wife makes seventy one dollars every hour at the pc. she’s been unemployed for 4 months.. remaining month her take a look at became $13213 operating on the laptop for four hours each day.. take a look at….. Usa Online Jobs

  18. In online forums people from elsewhere in the world that don’t have popular gun ownership say these events are the fault of popular gun ownership — that if the police knew that only they and criminals had guns, they wouldn’t need to go in shooting against regular folks.

  19. Let’s be brutally honest. Conservative and Libertarian people aren’t up in arms over the Taylor case in large past because BLM and Antifa. Liam to be, and experience has shown us that if you assume that anyone BLM/Antifa have their parities in a bunch over was a violent drug addled thug in the act of attacking somebody, you won’t often be wrong.

    And that is a lot of the point of the Democrats backing BLM; it completely discredits needed police reform, which that Fascist Left doesn’t want because it would hinder their police-State agenda.

    Yes, entirely too many no-knock warrants get signed. Yes, cops treat knock-and-announce as a formality all too often. Yes, dynamic entry raids are almost always an absurd escalation.

    And it going to be hard to get these points taken seriously while reforming the police, as a cause, has been taken over by the fashion-sense deprived reincarnation of the Brownshirts.

    1. Let’s be brutally honest. Conservative and Libertarian people have never been up in arms over police misconduct. This lack of interest predates Taylor, BLM and Anti-Fascism by decades.

      1. Well, you’re half right. Conservatives, haven’t, but libertarians have.

      2. Disagree. Many conservatives and libertarians have been up in arms over police misconduct for decades.
        However, guess who gets immediately attacked and vilified whenever there is a whiff of a racial element. In most publicized leo misconduct situations, it has become a routine element that the left immediately attacks ‘racism’, blaming conservatives, or ‘guns’, blaming conservatives.
        It is a rare situation where conservatives or libertarians are given any political voice in the media to provide rational corrective action. Castille is a perfect example of this (racism!), or Oregon (gun nut!) or Garner (racism!), or Ruby Ridge (gun nut!).

        1. Must disagree. The often heard conservative retort is that every profession has bad actors and almost all cops are heroes with no sense (denial) of the disproportionality of the actual number of bad actor cops.

          In addition, there’s no intellectually honest distinction made between the significance of bad actor cops and occupations by non-state actors. Why no “zero tolerance” in the domain of bad cops.

          1. The refrain is really “there are plenty of bad apples in the police departments and we need to do something about it, so that the majority of cops who are real heros can go back to being respected by the people they protect and server…but we can’t fire bad cops because the police unions won’t allow any cop to be dismissed.”

            Kinda like teachers and any other government employees.

          2. That’s because the focus is too often on the actors, the police and those barged in on, and not the policy itself.

      3. Never is easily disproved, it only takes one.

      4. Just anecdotally, my first exposure to the concept of civil asset forfeiture was in a novel written by (very conservative author) Dean Koontz back in 1994. He depicted a villain using the law as a weapon against an innocent man with whom he had a dispute.

        So to say that conservatives and libertarians have never been up in arms over police misconduct is a flat-out lie. The calls for reform have been there for decades, it’s just a very hard sell to the mass public, unlike the nonsense that BLM is shouting. Moronic oversimplification of the problem down to “Racism!” really does have an appeal to the kind of lazy thinkers who make up the majority of the population, but correctly identifying the problem as being the laws and policies that lead to violent outcomes (among white victims more often than black ones) and offering genuine solutions is too much work for most.

    2. There are a few reasons why libertarian people who have been vocal about police brutality/abuse/murder issues for a long time might be less than motivated to throw in with the BLM/Antifa cause just now, including:

      Many on the left mockingly asking why the libertarians haven’t “followed their lead” in opposing these things now; it’s hard to follow someone who’s finally arrived at the position where you’ve been for years, and since they’re only looking behind themselves they’re failing to notice who they’re actually being led by.

      I’m guessing a good number of libertarians might be sick of being called racist for believing that victims who happen to not be sufficiently “melinated” to fit the left’s narrative on the topic. A year before anyone had heard of George Floyd, I had a person who I’d once considered to be a friend threaten to kick my teeth in for suggesting that Daniel Shaver, George Tuttle, and Rhogena Nicholas should be remembered as victims along with Philado Castille, Tamir Rice, and John Crawford III (he then suggested a few weeks later that I should give him the money he needed to purchase a firearm)

      Less importantly, it’s a little hard to get enthusiastic to join a movement which continues to use the “hands up, don’t shoot” as a signature chant in reference to a case where even Eric Holder’s hand-picked investigator found that the claims of the man who was shot was surrendering at the time were completely fabricated and based on claims from “eye witnesses” who were six blocks from the scene and had no line of sight to anything that had happened.

      1. <

        it’s hard to follow someone who’s finally arrived at the position where you’ve been for years, and since they’re only looking behind themselves they’re failing to notice who they’re actually being led by.

        Exactly this. I had a far left FB rando demand that I speak out. That it was racist of me to be silent.

        I asked him where the fuck he was a decade ago when I was ACTIVELY condemning forced entry raids on a blog I kept for 5 years, and gave him a link?

        Nada in response.

    3. Can we talk about Daniel Shaver now?

      1. And Justine Damond. And Dennis Tuttle and Rhogena Nicholas. And Andrew Sadek. And Zachary Hammond. And Kameron Prescott. And Maggie Brooks.

  20. It really doesn’t matter what else is in your article if your main topic is presented by lies.

    She was not a medical worker. Because: murder victim found in her vehicle and stealing medication.

    She was on the warrant. Her current boyfriend was on the warrant. Her apartment and vehicle were on the warrant.

    She was actively involved with the drug gang. At that time.

    Gun owners don’t care about race when it comes to determining which shooting events to support or denounce. Drug gangs and violent criminals don’t make the list of things to support. Her boyfriend had and used a gun. Maybe in legitimate self defense. Maybe not. He wasn’t even supported by the members of the gang afterward, though. They blame him for her death. How odd. The police were there for valid reasons. No Drug Laws is one thing. Violent criminal gangs is very different.

    Try to be libertarian instead of mindless. Or libertarian versus libertine.

    1. I’ve heard that the warrant in this case was one of 10 that were approved by the same judge in a span of 13 minutes (or maybe it was 13 warrants in 10 minutes?). Is there any chance that any meaningful amount of evidence was presented in the 70-80 seconds or less that was apparently spent on consideration?

      1. There is, without a doubt, valid meta-questions about how the warrants were drafted, how much evidence there was, the concept of ‘no knock warrants’ (even though this warrant was served with a knock) and of course, the warn on drugs in general. Part of the evidence that led up to this warrant, however, were recorded jailhouse conversations between Taylor and her (then) jailed boyfriend where they discuss his drug business openly. Taylor was… at some level, involved (or at the minimum fully aware) in his illicit drug dealing business.

        None of this is to suggest that she “deserved” to die– but the media malfeasance at the start of this case (just like the malfeasance present in the Jacob Blake case) gets off-putting. And of course, has the danger of causing people nominally against this type of law enforcement to become apathetic.

        I’d rather hear the full, ugly, unfiltered truth about Jacob Blake than being told he was just a good-hearted citizen who pulled his lawful vehicle over to break up a random fight on the street.

      2. 5 warrants in 13 minutes, with the target being Taylor’s ex-boyfriend, now friend and his associates. Not Taylor per se.

    2. None of the facts, even if they are as they appear, justify a forced entry raid at zero dark thirty.

      1. What justifies misrepresenting…or outright lying…about the facts?

    3. 1. Breonna was CURRENTLY employed with UofL Health as an ER technician and had just gotten off a couple 12 hour shifts.

      2. Breonna was NEVER INVOLVED in the drug trade. Breonna had been romantically involved with Glover, which terminated. However she continued to be a close friend and in that manner continued to be indirectly involved with Glover and his friends by bailing Glover out periodically and also one of his friends on occasion and often held money for Jamarcus. It was specifically because Taylor was Glover’s friend, BUT was not in the drug business that they called her when they need help. In none of the documentation in the case investigations evidence and documents is there ever the allegation that she was part of any drug operations.

      3. The police observed Jamarcus Glover pick up a “suspected USPS” package ONE TIME from Breonna’s, and then go to a drug dealers house near his own house. Det Jaynes, who filed the warrant affidavit on Taylor’s home, falsely stated that the USPS had confirmed that Taylor had received packages on several occasions for Glover. The USPS denied this and Jaynes was shortly after reassigned because it.

      The warrant for Taylor’s home was 1 of 5 executed to apprehend Glover and several of his drug dealer friends. It was 1 of 2 that they hoped not to serve, but because 2 key dealers were not at the primary residences, that they decided to go forward with Taylor’s warrant.

      How does finding a murder victim in her car make her not a medical worker? Especially when she a medical worker?

  21. (A judge had issued a no-knock warrant in the Taylor raid, even though it later was amended to a knock-and-announce warrant.)

    a “warrant” that was executed at 1 am, with all of 45 seconds best case between the “announcement” (that only one witness heard, and only on the third interview) and the assault. how credulous must one be to buy into the police version of this story??

    1. The cops estimated that they knocked between 45 seconds to 2 minutes.

      Two witnesses actually said they heard NO knocking, which is impossible. One of them remarked “they shot a drug dealing girl”. In any case, the odds that 11 witnesses in an apartment complex were all in a good position to hear the whole commotion (on a March night when windows were likely closed) is slim.

      We know they knocked. So if they’re lying, they knocked for as long 2 minutes without ever identifying themselves, even though they had a no knock warrant. What’s the point? Had they just rushed in without notice Taylor might be alive, assuming Walker peacefully surrenders.

      Don’t you think it’s weird that Walker grabbed his gun from the get go? He says he and Taylor screamed at the top of their lungs at the knockers to identify themselves, but apparently no witness has confirmed it.

  22. First of all, we gun-rights supporters are outraged at dozens of incidents a year where wrong-door no-knock raids end up with someone killed and the lawful gun owner is charged.

    The reason this case hasn’t spawned a phalanx of gun-rights supporters burning down gas stations and pulling random drivers from their cars is because it’s what’s known as a ‘contentious’ case with a lot of muddy facts and has the overwhelming stench of media malfeasance.

    1. No it isn’t.

      It’s because they think the police were right. That because they were in the right place after the right person absolves a forced entry raid.

      This is about protecting cops, not about shady actors.

      The policy is the problem, and as long as we focus on specific actors, the big picture will never be addressed.

  23. First of all, we gun-rights supporters are outraged at dozens of incidents a year where wrong-door no-knock raids end up with someone killed and the lawful gun owner is charged.

  24. This story did not age well. Still conflicting reports of it being a no knock raid or if they were announced. Today ballistics evidence reported that she died from a bullet from the boyfriends gun.
    Only people who get to examine the evidence first hand can make a solid decision but we can all remember the lies about “Hands Up Don’t Shoot”

    1. Died from bullet from Walker?

      Any evidence of that since it directly contradicts both Walker’s and the police’s accounts, particularly how Det. Mattingly got shot in the thigh as the first one in?

  25. You need to look into the size of Police forces and the number of SWAT teams there were before the Clinton Administration started giving out their “Community Block Grants” in the 90’s.

  26. Who ever said it didn’t? We’re just not out burning down cities because of it.

  27. It seems many writers have a vast misunderstanding of many gun rights groups. It’s a simple issue of the fact that some gun rights groups have deep ties to law enforcement or a substantial number of law enforcement as members. These groups therefore hesitate to dive in and express outrage toward a substantial percentage of their supporters.

    Perhaps reason could do an interview with Maj Toure of Black Guns Matter and get his take on it.

    1. That’s a major problem, but it shows their thinking is wrong.

      Condemning forced entry raids is no more anti-cop than condemning bad wars is anti-soldier, which is to say condemning the policies which not only allow, but incentivize forced entry raids, is not attacking a single cop. In fact, it’s PRO cop because it means being inserted in to situations where they have to introduce violence and put themselves in danger where there was none to begin with.

      As long as the focus is on the actors, the policy cannot be made right.

      1. Bingo! I think you hit the nail on the head but that’s never how the media plays it out. It’s always “bad cop” never “bad policy”. As long as CNN et al. get to write the narrative it precludes the likelihood of an honest discussion and once the narrative is written and lawsuits filed – the divisiveness overrides everything else.

  28. This has nothing to do with second amendment or no knock raids. Walker was never charged with gun crimes (unlike the Mccloskeys) and by his own admission, the police knocked.

    Taylor (fired from her EMT jobs two years ago) once dated a drug dealer who put a dead man in car she rented. She denied any involvement but was likely under police radar since. The police suspected Taylor’s ex was sending packages to her current boyfriend’s home. A search on his phone revealed drug dealings. Since we’re talking about illegal drug trade and not just personal usage, I don’t see where drug war conversation enters the picture. We’re just going to let unlicensed people sell products on the street after full legalization?

    The only question is whether cops announced themselves as they knocked. If Walker heard them, refused to open the door and shot at them then he’d be guilty of attempted murder. Walker admitted that he might not have heard the officers because he was far away.

    Midnight isn’t all that late, people knock on doors at that hour

    1. You should read more of Reason’s articles on this and/or the Courier Journal of Louisville.

      Yes police knocked. And by the time that Taylor and Walker were cognizant of it they were banging on the door. Preponderance of evidence shows they did not announce themselves.

      It is a flatly false allegation, repeated everywhere, that police suspected Taylor’s ex of sending packages. They had knowledge of Glover picking up a “suspected USPS” package just once.

      A search of the phone DID NOT reveal drug dealings. It revealed that Glover, and a few of his friends, would always call Breonna whey they needed to get bailed out.

      Lastly, as the other 4 searched warrants indicated that evening, the search was not about looking for drugs or ties do drug dealing, it was specifically about finding and arresting Jamarcus Glover. The last 2 warrants, including Taylor’s, were only to be executed if they came up short on the first 3 warrants. Except that the did arrest Glover earlier that evening and which should have precluded serving the warrant 40 minutes later. But they decided that since they could not find the 2 other key drug dealers (DC & AW), they would go ahead and serve Taylor. The only connection of DC & AW to Taylor was that AW visited 1 time before with Glover. They had no relationship with Taylor.

      Lastly, they did not have an execution plan to serve Taylor as required, but just impromptu went directly to her house and immediately served the warrant.

  29. Since they did Knock and announce, this wasn’t a no knock raid. Since drugs were delivered to this address by Breonna’s ex, there was reasonable suspicion. The noise roused neighbors who were told to go back inside.

    1. Since they did NOT announce according to 11 of 12 neighbor witnesses and as substantially supported by the preponderance of evidence in the assault, it was in fact a no-knock raid in the true sense and as legally defined – as they are otherwise required to announce.

  30. Altogether to many in law enforcement/police work seem to have forgotten Protect and Serve, having adopted an US V. THEM attitude, where rather than serving, they rule. In my view, this constitutes a most unfortunate, and dangerous situation, for there are many times more of US, the ordinarily law abiding public than there are of THEM, the US being pushed around, seemingly with little or no thought given to possible consequences. I offer, likely unwelcome, the following suggestion to those who supposedly serve the piublic. Pay the most serious attention to whose toes you step on, for the patience and forbearance of the public is not without limits.

  31. As to why the Pro Gun Rights set is mute on this police fiasco, putting it politely, damned if I know, if that be the case.

  32. Not sure where you are getting your information from but it is inaccurate from what I’ve heard. Ms. Taylor was involved in the drug trade, she hadn’t been an EMT in a couple of years. The cops watched her ex going to her apartment and pick up a package then go to several known drug houses and make drops. They have phone calls from jail made to her. I never heard the warrant was anything but a no knock and it has been reviewed by attorneys. The fact that it wasn’t executed as a no knock is why Ms. Taylpr is dead. Everything about this raid was bad. But I don’t see why 2A supporters should be sreaming about this. If you shoot a police officer expect to be shot back. The cop who fired blindly into the apartment is the same one who was fired and indicted.

    1. Your info is wrong.

      1. Breonna had just gotten off a couple 12 hour shifts as an EMT.

      2. Breonna was NEVER INVOLVED in the drug trade. Breonna had been romantically involved with Glover, which terminated. However she continued to be a close friend and in that manner continued to be indirectly involved with Glover and his friends by bailing Glover out periodically and also one of his friends on occasion and often held money for Jamarcus. It was specifically because Taylor was Glover’s friend, BUT was not in the drug business that they called her when they need help. In none of the documentation in the case investigations evidence and documents is there ever the allegation that she was part of any drug operations.

      3. The police observed Jamarcus Glover pick up a “suspected USPS” package ONE TIME from Breonna’s, and then go to a drug dealers house near his own house. Det Jaynes, who filed the warrant affidavit on Taylor’s home, falsely stated that the USPS had confirmed that Taylor had received packages on several occasions for Glover. The USPS denied this and Jaynes was shortly after reassigned because it.

      The warrant for Taylor’s home was 1 of 5 executed to apprehend Glover and several of his drug dealer friends. It was 1 of 2 that they hoped not to serve, but because 2 key dealers were not at the primary residences, that they decided to go forward with Taylor’s warrant.

    2. Serving the warrant on Taylor was such a study of what not to do in serving warrants that Walker was finally not charged with anything and Louisville settled Taylor family’s lawsuit for $12 million in a pretty short period. Walker would very likely have won his case in court.

      The revised suit in July said that no body cam footage was ever produced despite many officers wearing body cams, despite lying and saying many interdiction officers did not wear them when they in fact did, and no apartment camera footage was ever produced.

      That was back in July. I am not sure if it was later produced since the investigation was allegedly completed and the suit was settled. in September.

  33. Disagree too.

    Libertarians like me and those I know are very upset about this. However, I wonder how much those ignorants screaming systemic racism have put Libertarians and conservatives at arms length on Breonna Taylor, for not wanting to be associated with them?

    For myself, it doesn’t matter to me. I have no problem defending Taylor and Walker, while calling the lying systemic racists out, and while supporting our guys in blue as our heroes, and while vehemently condemning bad cops and qualified immunity.

    I didn’t want a gun in my home when we had kids, but as they aged up and crime seemed to go up, and then we had a spurt of home invasions, I became anxious. But then a few years later we had a rash of SWAT raids gone bad over couple years in Phoenix and that’s when I said “hell no!” and went out and bought a Benelli M4 shotgun.

    I rarely worry about crime in my home, but I have never ceased to worry about police knocking down my front door since then.

    Now we have a couple grandkids visit each week. But thanks to the insanity of riots and looting and left-wing haters and deranged anti-Trumpers and Covid idiocy, I felt we did not have a choice and just bought a couple handguns for my wife and I last month.

    Sucks!

  34. 1. The cops were wrong to apply for a warrant, given the facts.
    2. The judge was wrong to grant it.
    3. The entry time (service time) was uncivilized, inappropriate, and unprofessionally executed.
    4. The response to one shot was hysterical, irrational, and could have resulted in cross fire with officers killing each other and/or next door neighbors.
    5. The commander in charge of the raid should be fired, the trainer fired, and the person who approved the raid fired.
    6. None of the above will change without public action, e.g., the cops are constantly getting more abusive, evolving into thugs.

  35. Had 2nd amendment supporters (or War on Drugs opponents) joined the protests opposing Taylor’s death, the protesters would have attacked them (for not sharing the racist narrative of their protests).

    Look what the protesters did to Rand Paul, who introduced legislation to actually reduce these incidents after Taylor’s death.

    How about an article exposing that Taylor’s protesters haven’t advocated ending the War on Drugs, no knock raids, asset forfeiture or other root causes of violence involving police (notably that much police violence involves poor fatherless people).

    Seems like Taylor’s protesters don’t want to prevent future incidences, but rather just want to falsely demonize police as racist and violent.

  36. SUBSTANTIAL PRIMA FACIE EVIDENCE THE POLICE ACTED ILLEGALLY:

    1. Walker was subsequently not charged.
    2. They settled with Taylor’s estate within 4 months of the lawsuit and within 6 months of the incident for $12 million, which is a very short time in such lawsuits and a very large sum.
    3. They attempted to get the drug dealer defendants to implicate Breonna as a co-conspirator in plea deals. (and failed too)

  37. “Heavy-handed police raids are trampling on the basic rights of all Americans.”

    “At what exact point, then should one resist …? How we burned in the prison camps later thinking: what would things have been like if every security operative, when he went out at night to make an arrest, had been uncertain whether he would return alive and had to say good-bye to his family? Or if during periods of mass arrests people had simply not sat there in their lairs, paling with terror at every step on the staircase, but had understood they had nothing to lose and had boldly set up in the downstairs hall an ambush of half a dozen people with axes, hammers, pokers, or whatever else was at hand. … The Organs [police] would very quickly have suffered a shortage of officers … and notwithstanding all of Stalin’s thirst, the cursed machine would have ground to a halt.”
    ~ Alexander Solzhenitsyn

    Solzhenitsyn and his fellow dissidents were too late to have any choice except between the camps and the “…downstairs hall….”

    We, though, still have the choice to urgently put government back in its proper box and to ensure that it is a small and secure box. The first line of the blueprint to that box is the recognition that all police are, but, Solzhenitsyn’s “organs.”

  38. the war on drugs is over, drugs won. to stop the cops from killing folks i have the following suggestions…

    1. stop hiring ex military as cops. their “mission” based mindset is perfect for war making, it’s bad in social interactions. shock and awe is not a fit tactic for 90% of their interactions

    2. stop rigging them out in tactical gear and relying on ONLY brute force for their operational methods. with the ability to surveil we have now it’s unnecessary to risk lives beating down doors

    3. end qualified immunity. until the actors are liable there will be no REAL reason to temper the overreactions by the thugs that have nothing to lose and often are not punished at all in any meaningful way

Please to post comments