Cancelling Justice Jackson?

Will casebooks need to expurgate a passage from the famous Youngstown concurrence?

|The Volokh Conspiracy |

Apropos of Eugene's post, I have long wondered whether constitutional law casebook editors will need to expurgate a passage from Justice Jackson's famous Youngstown concurrence:

I did not suppose, and I am not persuaded, that history leaves it open to question, at least in the courts, that the executive branch, like the Federal Government as a whole, possesses only delegated powers. The purpose of the Constitution was not only to grant power, but to keep it from getting out of hand. However, because the President does not enjoy unmentioned powers does not mean that the mentioned ones should be narrowed by a niggardly construction. Some clauses could be made almost unworkable, as well as immutable, by refusal to indulge some latitude of interpretation for changing times. I have heretofore, and do now, give to the enumerated powers the scope and elasticity afforded by what seem to be reasonable, practical implications instead of the rigidity dictated by a doctrinaire textualism.