Homeschooling

Families Turn to Homeschooling as the Education Establishment Fumbles Its Pandemic Response

If you can’t count on schools to perform their core educational responsibilities, why wouldn’t you look elsewhere?

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President Donald Trump got a lot of pushback for his criticism of school reopening guidelines from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)including from the CDC itself. But even many people who share the CDC's goal of minimizing health risks in the midst of a pandemic agree that the guidelines aren't especially practical. Keeping kids masked and separated in a learning environment intended for groups makes sense only to those who have little experience with schoolsor children. That has lots of parents looking at alternatives such as homeschooling that allow them to implement their own guidelines not just for health, but for their kids' education.

"I disagree with @CDCgov on their very tough & expensive guidelines for opening schools. While they want them open, they are asking schools to do very impractical things. I will be meeting with them!!!" the president tweeted on July 8. Not content to just voice his displeasure, he also threatened to cut federal funding for schools that don't fully reopen.

When Trump tweets, his critics automatically respond. California Gov. Gavin Newsom shot back that his state's schools will make their own decisions without regard to the president's desires. Fair enoughlocal decisions are usually preferable to one-size-fits-none orders from on-high.

But Trump isn't alone in finding the CDC's guidelines unwieldy.

"To prevent the spread of the coronavirus, school leaders must ensure social distancing—limiting group sizes, keeping students six feet apart, restricting non-essential visitors, and closing communal spaces. Those measures run counter to how schools usually operate, with teachers and students working together in close quarters, children socializing throughout the day, and the buildings serving as a community gathering space," Education Week noted in June.

"Schools are not designed for social distancing," Megan Tuttle, president of the National Education Association of New Hampshire, agrees. "Classes and hallways are already overcrowded and many of our schools have inadequate HVAC systems resulting in poor air circulation. These are prime COVID-19 transmission conditions. If we're not ready to make the investments necessary to make our buildings safe, then we're not ready to reopen them."

Leave it to a labor union official to turn a health crisis into an argument for a deeper dip into taxpayers' pockets even as the economy tanks… But Tuttle is right that schools weren't designed for keeping kids isolated from one another. That has educators across the country scrambling to un-crowd classrooms so that social distance can be maintained.

Remote learning via online classes, and hybrid approaches that have kids in school some days and learning remotely on others, are the go-to solutions for now.

"Through a mix of in-school and at-home learning we can make more space in every classroom and building. That means most kids coming to school 2 days a week," New York City's Mayor Bill de Blasio announced on July 8. His plan sets creaky wheels turning for the nation's largest public school district.

On its face, that hybrid plan is a reasonably innovative approach to teaching. Unfortunately, schoolsparticularly those run by governmentare almost as incapable of successful innovation as they are at physically expanding the square footage of their classrooms and cafeterias.

"Some schools, particularly those with ample resources and some experience with remote learning, had a far easier time of it than most," reports the Wall Street Journal of pandemic-prompted efforts at teaching online. But for most schools, "it was a failure" because of inexperience with the approach, limited access to technology, and a lack of commitment on the part of participants.

In addition, many families, especially those with younger children, rely on schools to mind their kids while parents are at work. If you're going to lose the day care function of schools, and not be able to count on them to perform their core educational responsibilities, why wouldn't you look elsewhere? There's not much to lose in emulating Newsom's revolt against orders from on-high in favor of personal decisions about education.

Unsurprisingly, there's an upswing in families planning to homeschool their kids this fall, either through their own efforts or through dedicated online classes and schools that have experience with remote learning. While it's difficult to track numbers when it comes to homeschooling, "several states, including Texas, Utah and Washington, have reported sharp upticks in interest," according to NBC News. North Carolina's website for families announcing plans to homeschool crashed at the beginning of July "due to an overwhelming submission of Notices of Intent."

Parents asked about their reasons for pulling their kids from schools cite both concerns about their kids contracting COVID-19 in the classroom as well as worries that traditional school districts aren't up to the challenges of teaching through remote and hybrid models. They can either place their faith in an education establishment that hasn't earned that sort of trust, or they can experiment with alternatives that have grown increasingly popular in recent years precisely because they satisfy the demand for flexible and effective learning approaches.

"It looks like the high school is only offering a remote learning options," a friend who has three teenage daughters and lives outside Chicago told me. "Could you resend me that list you made of homeschooling resources?"

Why, yes. Here it is!

A lot of homeschooling options are online, given the low cost involved in delivering complete schools, classes, lectures, and the like over the Internet. The internet can also mean easy ways to order books, tools, and materials for families who prefer hands-on learning.

Splitting the difference between family-based education and institutional schooling is a growing movement of home- and community-based microschools that deliver lessons to small groups of kids. That allows parents who need to work to pool their resources while ensuring adult supervision. For a monthly fee (or free in Arizona), Prenda offers its curriculum for use by both microschools and by families for their own children.

All of this experimentation has the establishment worried. Harvard Law's Elizabeth Bartholet infamously calls for "a presumptive ban" on homeschooling because of the supposed danger it represents to children and society.

That prohibitionist impulse comes a little late. Traditional schools right now are fumbling the response to a crisis and convincing much of the public that they are dangerous to children and society. Families fleeing from those schools in search of alternatives are going to prove a tough audience for arguments that kids should be trapped in poorly managed classrooms that aren't up to the latest challenge.

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    1. Probably NOT tutoring from home via internet?

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  3. Leave it to a labor union official to turn a health crisis into an argument for a deeper dip into taxpayers’ pockets even as the economy tanks

    To government employees, Everything is a cause for more money from taxpayers. That’s why government employee unions should be illegal.

    1. I also blame the kinds of parents who have children they can’t afford to educate themselves and treat public schools like a free babysitter. Not everyone who does that thinks about it in terms of how they can’t parasite off the taxpayers, but there’s no way to tell the difference between those who act that way with goodness in their hearts and those who don’t.

      Sometimes, it’s like Tony Soprano using his therapist as a means to mimic the appearance of people with a conscience and learn to manipulate people. How do you tell parents who are genuinely doing their best from parents who shit out kids they can’t afford to house, feed, and educate–because the government supplies them with the opportunity and a motive?

      The answer my friend is blowin’ in the wind.
      The answer is blowin’ in the wind.

      P.S. Surely it has something to do with people who work for a living. Single working moms maybe can’t stay home all day watching their 3rd graders and also work for a living. Those who don’t work, however? If they aren’t smart enough to follow 3rd grade lesson plans with their kids at home, then they need other things to help guide them in their decision making. Persistent hunger, for instance, is nature’s way of telling us that procreating probably isn’t a good idea.

      1. Not everyone who does that thinks about it in terms of how they can’t parasite off the taxpayers, but there’s no way to tell the difference between those who act that way with goodness in their hearts and those who don’t.

        Yet.

        1. Someone hit us with a comment below about the very mentality I was talking about!

          I don’t know how to say the following in a sensitive way, but it seems to me that some people don’t have any sense of their children being a burden to other people.

          I love kids!

          . . . right up until the moment you start sending me the bills for kids that aren’t mine.

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          2. i’ve said for years: as long as society decides it will underwrite anyone who wants to have as many kids as they want no matter how unqualified they are to parent, ‘things’ will never get better.

            1. Agreed. I have one child because that’s all I can afford financially but even more importantly mentally and emotionally. It seems the majority of people with the most kids are the ones who are completely incapable of providing them with basic necessities let alone worrying about their educational development and raising the next generation of contributing members of society rather than another generation of people who will need their lives subsidized by taxpayers. Having grown up in the Bronx I’m still amazed at how many people still think nothing if having kids they cant feed but are constantly frustrated by how poor they are as if there’s no connection.

              The mayor of NY says schools cant reopen until all the kids have laptops and internet access. Well my daughters school in Philly delayed starting remote learning for an entire month after the lockdown for this reason. Well it was a waste of time for the kids who already had laptops and internet access at home. Many of the kids never logged on and did the work despite chromebook and internet provided to them. Where the hell were their parents? Not caring anymore about their education now then they did before the pandemic. The kids who were flunking in February with parents who cant be bothered to make sure they do their schoolwork or show up to speak with teachers are going to flunk remote learning or whatever hybrid program the schools settle on.

              To be fair, many kids don’t care about school. They care as much as about their education as their parents/guardians care.

              1. “It seems the majority of people with the most kids are the ones who are completely incapable of providing them with basic necessities let alone worrying about their educational development and raising the next generation of contributing members of society rather than another generation of people who will need their lives subsidized by taxpayers.”

                There’s this thing called moral hazard, and it doesn’t get anywhere near the amount of attention it deserves.

      2. “parents who have children they can’t afford to educate”

        Unless you’re talking about doctorate degrees I have no idea what you’re talking about.

      3. Fine. I need a discount on my taxes for the expenses of the public school system I am opting out of. Thanks, and see ya’!

  4. I’m tired of schools treating me as if I’m evil because I rely on schools for day care. In previous summers, when summer camp was legal, I paid for my kids to go. I paid for my kids to go to aftercare. I have no trouble paying.

    Next year, because schools are not in the “business of daycare”, we’re basically screwed for the three days without in-school class. They offer aftercare but we’re not supposed to send our kids anywhere on other days because it would defeat their pandemic-theater hybrid model.

    This whole pandemic has been all about taking a big problem and finding ways to make it even bigger. Sadly, this seems to be the norm for bureaucracy. Somehow, it doesn’t impact the private schools and some of the charters (assuming they aren’t forced to close entirely again).

    1. Jesus Christ, I can’t believe I’m paying for this shit.

    2. “I’m tired of schools treating me as if I’m evil because I rely on schools for day care.”

      I’m tired of paying for other people’s children.

  5. Homeschooling is for slack-jaws.

    Much like conservative-controlled colleges (nonsense-teaching, fourth-tier, censorship-shackled, sketchily accredited goober factories that suppress science and warp history to flatter the slack-jaws’ superstition).

    Slack-jaws have rights, too — including the right to hobble their children with downscale education (until the age at which bright flight kicks in, and the smart, ambitious young people leave the sticks and their clinger parents, able to seek education, modernity, and opportunity elsewhere, never to return).

    1. “Homeschooling is for slack-jaws…”

      Asshole bigots aspire to be slack-jaws.

    2. “hobble their children with downscale education”

      Hey just like the far left does with their government flavored education that does major harm to the people they claim to care about.

      I’ll take anyone who’s against the far left justice crowd of violent thugs and looters.

      1. “hobble their children with downscale education”

        In SF, the gov’t-grammar-school teachers emptied their classrooms on 11/10/16 in order to parade the children on the sidewalks, which children, we were assured, were unanimous in their desire to “RESIST” Trump.
        Home-school and private-school kids stayed in their classes AFAIK.

    3. Homeschooled children achieve levels of academic achievement similar to or higher than their publicly schooled peers. These results cut across racial and socio-economic lines.

      https://www.maloneymethod.com/news/what-does-the-research-say-about-homeschooling/

      Ignoring research because it hurts your feelz is for slackjaws

      1. Don’t know how you did it yet, Tulpa, but kudos on hacking my account.

      2. Oh, wow. Just a space character at the start of the handle. Reason’s web programming is awful.

      3. Remember, I’m your disciple, so I will use these techniques, too. I learn from you, you magnificent bastard!

      4. Hey thanks, Tulpa! Now, that you’ve taught me that you can spoof anybody’s handle by using a HAIR SPACE character, I will be emulating your behavior!

        1. Jeez! What an asshole!

        2. The problem here is that tulpa mimics your idiocy. You sadly are not smart enough to mimic and slightly tweak those of us who have been here for years. So in reality all that will happen is you will be continued to be mocked.

          And sadly, most of us dont cry here like you do. You’ve admitted you changed your behavior due to how you were treated here. Pretty pathetic actually lol.

          1. I didn’t say I would mimic you. I said that if you don’t speak more respectfully to others, I will steal your handle and shit all over the threads in your name. Just annoying crap that will annoy everyone.

            If you, and others, grow up and start exhibiting good manners, I will, too. That’s what I want, anyway.

            I’ve studied Tulpa’s techniques and have several at my disposal.

        3. It’s pretty funny how you just outed your other sock by using the same character at the beginning of your first pathetic attempt to spoof. LMFAO. Excellent work, Clousseau.

          1. Except it’s not the same character. I was trying to insert a HAIR SPACE character at the start of JesseAz, and did it wrong. A technique I leaned from you, Tulpa.

            Since I’m just an amateur asshole, I don’t know all these spoofing techniques until I learn them from you, a professional ass.

      5. So, here is how this is going to work.

        I’ve been studying Tulpa’s techniques, but I will not use them as long as everyone here communicates politely and civilly.

        As soon as I see anyone making personal attacks, or see Tulpa shi**ing up the comments, I will feel free to start stealing handles and shi**ing up the thread in response. Mutually assured destruction.

        Have a nice day!

        1. You’ve done nothing but make personal attacks. Lol.

          Once again you admit that you have changed based on behaviors of others. This just proves you have no consistency or well thought out ideas.

          People will continue to laugh at you.

          1. I’ve said how it’s going to be. Exhibit manners and there will be no problem. You are in the driver’s seat of how this goes.

          2. It’s all ready to go. Your choice whether you want to behave yourself and speak to people politely.

            1. Fuck you with a rusty, running chainsaw, you pathetic piece of shit.

        2. Fuck you.
          YOU are not my ‘leader’; fuck off and die.

          1. I won’t do it today, but starting tomorrow, you must be more polite to people.

            1. Watch out guys, dipshit might out his sock another 15 times in the same thread while trying to spoof. And we’ll never know the truth because he is a master at concealing his tics and rhetorical cliches and totally doesn’t regurgitate the same half dozen Democratic Underground talking points in literally every thread. Be affeared! Be very affeared!

            2. “I won’t do it today, but starting tomorrow, you must be more polite to people.”

              Fuck off and die, tin-pot-dictator wannabe.

              1. You could just exhibit some manners toward people, then I won’t do any of this annoying Tulpa-like crap.

                1. Don’t you guys (?) have anything better to do?

    4. Kirkland is just being ignorant here. He has no idea what he’s talking about.

      No facts whatsoever. Just ignorance.

      The people who defend public schools (as opposed to religious schools or homeschooling) are always preoccupied with explaining why religious schools and homeschooling outperforms public schools so handily at so much less cost. They’ll say it’s because the kinds of people who send their kids to religious schools or home school are the kinds of people who tend to do well in public schools anyway. They’ll say public school test results, etc. reflect the fact that public schools have more kids from lower socio-economic backgrounds, etc.

      Religious schools and home schoolers don’t need to explain why the average kid from their programs perform lower than the average kid in public schools because that simply doesn’t happen.

      If Kirkland knew what he was talking about, he presumably wouldn’t have inserted his foot into his mouth.

      I bet he’s a product of public schools!

      I’ve long thought that public schools tend to teach conformity rather than critical thinking. Even if they could, what incentive would there be for bureaucrats, teachers’ unions, and elected officials teach voters critical thinking? From the perspective of parents who want their kids to learn critical thinking skills, too, why would you send them to a system controlled by government bureaucrats and teachers’ unions to learn those skills? Talk about the fox guarding the hen house!

      Seems like the only thing Kirkland’s education system taught him was how to feel like he’s educated.

      1. Rational thought is racist. Cut it out.

    5. I will concede that you accurately describe some subset of homeschoolers, but there are many kinds of homeschooling families. And, right now, pretty much all parents are de facto homeschoolers.

    6. If you think only parochial schools are shackled by censorship, you have not been around any public schools, in the past 20 years.

      The level of censorship of both students and teachers have reached a point that even dictators only dream of. Have you never read any of Robby Soave’s coverage here?

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    8. How fucking ignorant do you have to be to believe the only people that homeschool are fundamentalist Christians?

  6. The elitism and arrogance of Harvard Law’s Elizabeth Bartholet in her article is astounding. Her reasoning is everything we do not want. The decision to educate a child is a parental, not governmental decision. Ms. Bartholet argues the opposite, and the implications from her position are chilling.

    The pandemic is forcing us to rethink how educational content will be delivered to our children. Homeschooling is happening, regardless of whether we want it or not. There are an array of online options for delivering content online. It is infinitely more flexible and cheaper than the traditional classroom.

    I don’t think public sector unions in general are grasping the dimensions of their problem. There will be a meaningful proportion of parents who choose to opt-out. They will want to take their tax dollars with them.

    1. I have thought for a little while now that the transformative power of the Internet will disrupt every industry, and it’s only a matter of time before that transformation makes its way to the traditional educational establishment.

      1. “I have thought for a little while now”

        So you’re decades behind the rest of us. Kudos.

        1. But decades ahead in the eating part of life.

    2. “There will be a meaningful proportion of parents who choose to opt-out. They will want to take their tax dollars with them.”

      Tough.

      1. Hitler and his KKK Nazis wanted your tax dollars to pay for universal child indoctrination programs too, reverent. There they turned out Hitler Youth. Here they turn out modern versions of Sendero Luminoso Antifa crypto-nazis.

    3. …and it’s up to ME to try to monetize this thing!

  7. The article mentions parents who are concerned about their kids getting covid19 wanting to homeschool. I’m not concerned and wouldn’t mind opening up the school as normal and let the virus run its course. Why? Because I’m mean and don’t like grandmas, or so some will tell me. I haven’t read any proof that kids often get sick or are major spreaders of the virus.

    It’s the overreaction that bothers me. I’m still waiting to hear how my kids’ school will proceed. I’m a single parent and work from home. I can work better with my kids at school. However, I’ve heard rumors that the school might require kids to stay home for any little thing, or I will have to get them if they happen to cough or sneeze at school. Another rumor is that if they are absent for any reason they need a doctor’s note to return to school.

    These possible procedures, and others I’m waiting to hear about, might make sending the kids to school worse than homeschooling. Plus, the dependence on masks and trying to social distancing at school will take away a lot of the value the school provides. With homeschooling I can coordinate the schedules and plan my work time.

    So in a week I expect to learn the details of the school procedures and will make a decision.

    1. We have turned over the running of our lives and the entire economy to people whose sole qualification for the direction of same is a medical degree.
      At this point, even a million dead would be a cheap price in order to reclaim 290,000,000 lives.

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        1. Thanks, Tulpa, for teaching me a new technique!

    2. So in a week I expect to learn the details of the school procedures and will make a decision.
      Unless you live in an unusually sane part of the country, expect hybrid at best. Schools will provide reduced education two days a week while your kids goof off the remaining three. The remote education they provided last school year was a joke.

  8. I’ll say this again, because it’s a way out of the current situation while affirming a libertarian, individualized approach to universal education:

    The long term goal should be to have all completely private schools. Government can provide a voucher to parents to educate their kids, no strings attached. Literally no strings, so this gets around the problem of government attempting to use voucher money to try to impose conditions on the schools. So shitty parents could blow their voucher money on coke and hookers and call it ‘homeschooling’. But to avoid this outcome, at the end of the educational experience is a high-stakes series of assessments, determined by the state, which determines if a student gets a diploma – and the diploma is what grants someone full rights of adulthood. No diploma, and in the eyes of the state, you’re still a child, even if you’re 50 years old. Can’t sign contracts, can’t vote, etc. So parents would have a very good reason not to waste their voucher money and instead use it to genuinely educate their kids. For the kids of the truly shitty parents out there, there would be GED programs like we have now.

    In the short term, I think we should everything we can to promote individualized educational models. That could be homeschooling, co-op situations, whatever. But also demand rigor in these various options. It’s not enough to advocate for parents to homeschool their kids, we should be advocating for them to do so rigorously. For in the model I proposed above, they would have to do so otherwise their kids wouldn’t become legal adults. I know a lot of homeschooling parents already do this, just emphasizing it for clarity.

    1. “I’ll say this again”

      Please don’t.

    2. Interesting idea, but I’m not sure about the test part. That could turn into a huge lever for using government for social manipulation.

      1. Well, yes it could be. But it has to be viewed in light of the status quo. Arguably there is a much greater opportunity for manipulation of the curriculum under the current educational regime.

        1. Well, yeah, it’s a test vs. 13-14 years of sitting there in your local educational institution.

    3. “high-stakes series of assessments, determined by the state,”

      Gave yourself away there, didn’t you?
      How about the company that hires you determines if you can do the job?
      How about you get to vote no matter what? Because that is what the constitution/laws/courts say (at this time)?
      How about contracts are contracts? Do we distinguish now between contracts signed by you, and those signed by others?

      1. How about the company that hires you determines if you can do the job?

        That wouldn’t change at all based on my plan.

        How about you get to vote no matter what? Because that is what the constitution/laws/courts say (at this time)?

        Right now the law is, you get to vote if you’re 18. But what is so special about the number 18? One rationale is that by this time, people are ‘adult enough’ in order to be entrusted to make informed choices. If that’s the rationale, then why should what constitutes ‘adult enough’ be based on an arbitrary age? Why not 15, or 25? In my plan, it would be based on having demonstrated the qualities associated with adulthood, and not an arbitrary age. That is the basic idea here.

        How about contracts are contracts? Do we distinguish now between contracts signed by you, and those signed by others?

        Right now, contracts signed by minors can’t be enforced because they can’t give legal consent. It would be no different under my plan.

        1. It’s a decent plan. The requirement for citizens’ rights is a bit problematic, but not insoluble. If you pay taxes, you should be able to vote. If you opt the “kids” out of paying taxes until test is passed, a whole new class of tax scofflaws emerges. I love the idea of wresting education out of the greedy corrupt hands of public-sector unions.

    4. Rigor is important but I think your proposal about that very high-stakes test is not the way to do it, for a variety of reasons.

      People “should” think ahead but often they don’t. It’s like the regulations prohibiting people with drug convictions from receiving federal financial aid to attend college. Just another barrier to participation for someone trying to put a decent adult life together.

      Single, high-stakes tests are notoriously problematic. What if someone misses the “grownup” cutoff by one point? Do they get a provisional license and test again next year? Also, how would that be enforced? “Let me see your grownup club card”? Retinal scans? And then what would these rejects do for the next sixty-odd years? I am absolutely sure they would stay busy and it clearly follows that the establishment wouldn’t like it. That’s not a functional society.

      I wish we had intellectual apprenticeships for kids. Public education sounds so good in the abstract but it only works for a few kids, and even for those there’s been timewasting and enforced immaturity. Actual competence-based curriculum would be amazing – none of this “passing with a C” for years at a time and at the end of it not able to do anything well. People also need to spend more time outside. And what mathematicians, scientists and programmers actually do all day remains mysterious to many. There’s a core skill set people need for basic numeracy, and it needs a lot more statistics and probability in it than most people get. Otherwise, you can peel off the ones that hate it and those whose skills lie elsewhere, and encourage them in developing the skills they do have.
      What prior generations remember as “rigor” isn’t replicable when kids are exposed to such divergent media stimuli. It never gears in, somehow. Doing lots of problems is still important and necessary for learning, but I’m not convinced it will feel the same way. Whether that’s bad or good is a different discussion, but I think subjecting all youth to “rigor” is a mistake. If they gravitate to it and thrive on it, great, create and support it. But what I remember of “rigor” in late elementary school and after, was some kids trying to do the problem correctly and caring about it, and everyone else being alternately shamed and ignored. Rigor is when the teacher is mean to the ones who don’t get it; the ones who do get it are just trying to do it correctly, which entails rigor. Learning by play and learning by doing is more successful for most subjects. And the broad-based humanities education which coaches “thinkers” and is rigorous in a different way, isn’t really accessible in the heavily scheduled public school format. There do need to be ways to pass along “social values” but merging it with the intellectual skills necessary to operate in the knowledge economy doesn’t always work.

      I can think of graduates of prestigious universities who can’t keep track of adding names to a list over a period of several months. I could see developing a laundry list of credentials in different subjects, I think there are some world educational systems that are like this, and people do sit for tests of various knowledge and skills. But spending years learning the watered-down versions and only getting to the real subject matter after years just supports the education industry. This is where homeschooling can fall short, it’s a big world and after a certain age kids need to see what adults do all day outside the home. I think good homeschooling does connect kids to those types of opportunities once they’re teenagers. I think that needs to expand dramatically.
      Kids are accustomed to sitting in large, intermittently supervised groups divided up by age. That’s a strange activity. My kids “miss their friends” but have evolved a sort of facetime/zoom hangout where the call is open and they can talk if they want but otherwise they’re just sortof playing with their stuff or playing a video game, almost like being at the friend’s house except there’s no access to their stuff and the call can end on a dime and they’re still home. It’s not “the same” but it’s still interaction. I hope this pandemic triggers a complete rethink of how young people are handled.

      1. I agree that single high-stakes tests are not ideal. That is why I would like to suggest a set of assessments. They can be creatively designed. They don’t just have to be some SAT-type test.

        And I think you perhaps over-interpreted what I meant by “rigor”. I certainly don’t think that students should be shamed or humiliated in class. Only that the education of students ought to be taken seriously.

        And thank you for your comments.

  9. My name is JesseAz, and I suck.

      1. Lol. Sad that you think this will be effective. People will continue laughing at your sophomoric ideas.

        It is fairly easy to tell who is who, especially with your infantile style.

        I’ll take this like a badge of honor just like making Hihns list or having sqrsly attempt to mimic me.

        I will stay consistent and not cry put to reason to moderate your comments.

        All your efforts will be in vain and I will continue to mock you.

        1. I stole your handle, using a technique I learned from Tulpa. Be more respectful in your comments here, or I will start regularly stealing your handle and posting sh— all over the threads in your name.

            1. If I catch you making any posts like this in the future, I will **** all over the threads using your handle. Understood?

              1. And then you’ll accidentally out 45 times a thread because you can’t even keep your sockpuppet accounts straight, and we will all laugh hysterically watching you flail like a retard.

              2. Fuck off and die, you tin-pot-dictator wannabe

                1. Your choice. All you have to do is exhibit manners toward others here.

                  1. Fuck off and die, you tin-pot-dictator wannabe.
                    Does that give your dictator-wannabe boner a charge, asshole?

  10. Government schools can easily expand their square footage. Though it may be in a way that increases the transmission of viral infections.

    In wealthy Arlington County, Virginia, almost every elementary and junior high school has four trailers on what used to be part of the playground. Usually they house an entire grade level (4th grade) or an entire subject area (foreign languages). Arlington teachers say the schools are working at 140% of capacity (for example, the system as a whole usually only has 80% of the substitute teachers it is trying to hire).

    Currently the crowding is due largely to immigration. But demands for more space due to coronavirus are no different.

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  12. Homeschooling?
    Are you kidding?
    No child will be properly indoctrinated while being taught at home.
    It takes trained professionals to properly brainwash children on the joys and wonders of socialist slavery, and no soccer mom can indoctrinate kids like those teachers we have in public schools.
    Homeschooling indeed!

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  14. A potential and perhaps inevitable solution – private learning academies, not unlike the ubiquitous “Hagwon” in South Korea.

    Essentially the parents would be sending their kids to something resembling an expanded version of Princeton Review. This wouldn’t be a charter school, it’s just a business that offers education. There would be no assemblies, no crowded hallway, no PE (does that even exist anymore), no sports teams.

    How can parents afford it? Simple. They either get a reduction in property taxes or they get a voucher. It makes no sense for them to pay taxes to support education when schools aren’t open, right?

  15. This whole thread is pointless. It is miniscule, the number of people that will switch to full-time home schooling.

    This is another piece by Tuccille that’s basically a advertorial for his own lifestyle. Not to mention all the libertarian preening that’s going on in the comments.

    1. There were about 1.8 million in 2007. There were already 2.3 million of them in 2018, and the trend is sure to have grown because of the Coronavirus.

  16. If you want to save your child to be affected by this pandemic called corona vorus then this is the best option to educate your child at home by telling them in way of creativity and playing.But in my openion the child cannot learn that much as he or she learn in the school.But we have to understand the situation,about the seriousness of the situation we all are facing.

  17. Last year my local public school district passed a large bond issue based primarily on the need to enhance school security because of active killer concerns. Those hardening construction projects, entry foyers, limits on the number of entrances, locks for exterior and interior doors, etc. are all wrapping up (except for the new middle school being built).

    All of the improvements are the exact opposite of what is needed to facilitate “social distancing.”

  18. I’m with Facilities at a k-12 charter school. We’ve been having meeting about the ridiculous hoops we are anticipating having to jump through. I end every meeting with some variation of “y’all do understand, don’t you, that kids don’t catch the WuFlu, and, by all evidence, don’t spread it to adults (probably because they don’t catch it).”
    I get some sighs, but little argument other than “we have to follow the guidelines of the school district or we don’t get paid.”

  19. The data and literature from around the world is crystal clear that kids aren’t in danger and they don’t spread it like first thought.

    Everything else around these facts is noise and cynical political using kids as leverage as well as projecting adult fears onto them.

    Open the damn schools and get back to work. Don’t want to go back? Cut pay or fire them.

    No more messing around with the kids and their education.

    Newsom can eat a bag of dicks. Nothing less than full opening would be a huge disservice and disappointment ACROSS NORTH AMERICA.

    Trump is 100% correct. He understands what’s at stake. Democrats are just assholes. If they ‘follow science’ well there it is.

    Now shut the fuck up and open the damn schools. Sick of this shit.

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  21. God I hate reason.com and all the left wing freaks who post on it. Burn in hell you Marxist whores. Have a nice summer, bitches.

  22. Up until now, teachers considered themselves to be ‘essential workers.’ I guess that’s relative to whether it suits them. Health care workers face far, far more danger, yet they go to work every day. Teachers, for the most part, are cowards.

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