Coronavirus

Trump's COVID-19 Testing Blueprint Is Another Attempt to Avoid Responsibility

Also included is an "alternative facts" narrative of federal government testing screw-ups since January.

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At a press conference last night, President Donald Trump unveiled two documents—a "Testing Overview" and a "Testing Blueprint"—that comprise the latest phase of his administration's plan for "opening up America again" amid the COVID-19 pandemic. These documents state that a big part ending the current pandemic lockdowns depends on testing for COVID-19 infections in symptomatic patients and by testing for antibodies in the broader population in order to determine how many people have already been exposed to the virus.

Diagnostic tests can be used to identify which patients with respiratory illnesses are actually infected with COVID-19 while also enabling the tracing and quarantining of their contacts who subsequently test positive. Antibody blood tests enable public health officials to figure out what percentage of the population has already been infected. Antibody tests provide a better idea of just how deadly the disease is and, one hopes, will also help to identify those individuals, now more or less immune to the disease, who can safely leave lockdown and resume their normal activities.

Reading through the two documents, it is apparent that the "Testing Overview" is largely an "alternative facts" narrative that aims to direct attention away from the egregious mistakes that the Trump administration committed with respect to diagnostic testing as the pandemic began to accelerate in January and February 2020. The "Testing Blueprint," meanwhile, makes it clear that the Trump administration will blame states and localities for any future failures with respect to diagnostic and antibody testing and contact tracing.

Let's delve first into the "Testing Overview." It features a timeline that purportedly details "the foundation for diagnostic testing." This timeline notes that the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) started developing a diagnostic test to detect the coronavirus on January 10. That may seem like a timely beginning, but the timeline fails to mention that the CDC sent its badly botched test out on February 5. At the same time, the CDC stymied the development of alternative tests by academic and private laboratories.

In a section on mobilizing the private sector to develop tests, the "Testing Overview" reports that on January 21 the Biomedical Advanced Research and Development Authority convened leading diagnostic companies to develop COVID-19 tests. Nevertheless, the agency did not begin funding the development of such tests until the beginning of March. The "Testing Overview" notes that the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) got around to loosening its regulatory stranglehold on privately developed diagnostics on February 29. It further reports that the FDA's first emergency use authorization (EUA) was issued for a test developed by Roche on March 13. The good news is that once unleashed the private sector responded and as of yesterday there were 70 EUAs for tests.

Contrast the Trump administration's handling of testing with what Germany and South Korea did. German researchers developed and released their first COVID-19 diagnostic test on January 16. Similarly, South Korean public health officials met with private sector biotech companies on January 27 and urged them to develop a diagnostic test. The first South Korean diagnostic test developed by the private company Kogene Biotech was approved just a week later, one day before the CDC shipped its flawed test.

South Korea and the U.S. both reported their first COVID-19 cases on January 20. But because of differences in the deployment of diagnostic testing and the tracking of contacts, the disease trajectories of the two countries have starkly diverged. By the beginning of March, South Korea had tested 150,000 people compared to 2,150 in the U.S. Thanks in large part to proactive testing and contact tracking, the number of daily diagnosed cases of COVID-19 in South Korea peaked at 909 cases on February 29.

As of today, the U.S. has confirmed more than one million cases and 57,000 deaths from the disease. Meanwhile, South Korea has so far fewer than 11,000 cases and 250 deaths. That amounts to one case per 330 and one death per 5,800 Americans, versus one case per 4,700 and one death per 206,000 South Koreans.

On March 13, President Trump announced that half a million tests would be available by the following week and that five million would be available by the beginning of April. In addition, the president announced that retail companies including Walgreens, CVS, Target, and Walmart would soon set up drive-through diagnostic test sites in their parking lots. The good news is that testing did begin to ramp up, but the promises of 500,000 tests within a week and five million by the end of March were not kept.

By March 20, the number of tests in the U.S. did rise by nearly 134,000 and by April 1 just over a million tests had been administered. But just four drive-through testing sites were open by March 28. The "Testing Overview" reports that 80 sites are now open. South Korea had 43 drive-through testing sites up and running before March 17. The five millionth diagnostic test promised for the end March was actually administered on April 25.

The administration's timeline amounts largely to an attempt to put a positive spin on the manifold failures of federal agencies to address the COVID-19 pandemic under the leadership of President Trump.

Now let's turn to the administration's "Testing Blueprint." What does it say about what comes next?

The "Testing Blueprint" is mostly hortatory, urging state governments to engage in salutary efforts such as "develop[ing] testing plans and rapid response programs," "maximiz[ing] the use of all available testing platforms and venues," and "develop[ing] and implement[ing] sentinel monitoring."

For its part, the federal government says it will provide a "Blueprint for the testing plans and rapid response programs," which basically means that the "Testing Blueprint" will provide a blueprint. The federal government will also "provide strategic direction and technical assistance." More helpfully, the federal government will get out of the way by providing "expedited regulatory authorizations for tests and testing equipment."

The "Testing Blueprint" places the primary responsibility on the states to fund and vastly expand coronavirus testing. It says that the following principles should guide the states as they develop and execute programs and plans including (1) testing every symptomatic patient promptly and accurately; (2) setting up sentinel monitoring sites to warn of imminent local outbreaks at places such as urgent care facilities, primary care clinics, and senior assisted living facilities where asymptomatic individuals can be tested; and (3) creating rapid response programs that enable quick isolation and contact tracing of individuals who test positive, whether they are symptomatic or asymptomatic. Ultimately, the "Testing Blueprint" is not much more than a list of sensible recommendations that may well be marginally helpful to state governments as they deal with the pandemic going forward.

The Trump administration is surely right that state lawmakers and state public health departments will have big roles to play in setting up disease testing and tracking systems. But at the same time, the administration's "Testing Blueprint" is a cynical political document, designed mostly to let Trump off the hook. It allows him to blame the states if disease control efforts go awry while enabling him to avoid taking any responsibility for the health and economic harms that resulted from his administration's mishandling of the COVID-19 pandemic.

NEXT: A Kentucky Family of 7 Didn't Practice Social Distancing. Now Child Services Is Investigating the Parents for Abuse.

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  1. I would care if you had any credibility left, but you still have the remnants of all those bad models you slurped on your chin.

    1. His fingers are still crossed for 400k deaths.

    2. In Ron’s world, President Trump himself should have sat down at a lab bench in the CDC, invented the test himself and then mass produced it in massive quantities the following day.

      Naturally, in this world, Trump will receive no credit whatsoever for breaking through all the public health bureaucracies. Including with hydroxychloroquine.

      1. And speaking of alternative facts…

        The media and political establishment in February:
        “Trump interferes in federal agencies and tries to bully officials to do his bidding. Also, closing borders is racist.”

        The media and political establishment in April:
        “Trump didn’t pressure the FDA and CDC to loosen regulations on testing in February. Also, he failed to close the borders and was obviously trying to kill New York”

        I’ve been really disappointed in Bailey lately. I didn’t expect him to start lying to support the narrative too.

        1. Reason outraged President doesn’t exert authority he doesn’t have!

          “What kind of leader actually refrains from doing whatever he pleases?” pens libertarian ‘science’ writer Bailey. “We need a strongman to run the country. No more pussyfooting!”

  2. So Ron, is 250k-300k US deaths still reasonable, or are articles like this your attempt to avoid admitting that the people you called trolls owned you?

    1. Is it really that unreasonable to think total deaths will increase by a factor of 4 over the next 8 months?

      Perhaps not the most likely scenario, but not at all unreasonable.

      1. No its not unreasonable.

        It’s fucking retarded.

        So of course you buy it.

        1. Ah yes, the critical thinking one would expect to find at a place called “Reason”

          1. Yes it is completely unreasonable given the data. We are unlikely to pass 100K deaths. This is going to be similar to 1968-70.

            And what critical thinking are you applying here?

          2. Drink!

            So you just stupidly claiming it is reasonable sans evidence is any better?

            Fuck you.

          3. The data points no where close to 8x the deaths over the next year. A third of deaths have been nursing home regulations such as in NY and NJ. Media finally noticed and they are changing the nursing home laws in those states. The more natural death rates for elderly is like Florida. So unless you turn the US into the idiocy that is NYC, yes it is fucking unreasonable.

            1. Just strap that goal post to your back, Jesse.

              1. Your strap on fetish is showing.

              2. You of all people certainly shouldn’t be talking about others moving goalposts around.

      2. We’re on the downslope of the curve. If you think it is reasonable, then please explain where the 5 fold death rate comes from.

      3. Depends. Is the government going to keep counting all deaths where someone has the sniffles as covid related, even sans tests?

        1. The idea that epidemiologists would inflate the death toll in order to make Trump look bad is just another indication of true Trump Derangement Syndrome. These people are scientists and doctors whose lives are spent trying how to find answers to medical questions. They want the answers that only tests can give. Would lower numbers somehow make Trump look competent? Is the death toll the only metric of his failures or simplemindedness? Of course not. Every time he gets in front of a TV camera he says something that no death toll can argue: He cannot think critically or synthesize new information and he just plain doesn’t care about anything but his image. The really funny thing is that he actually thinks he’s impressing people when he says things like, “I’m, like, really smart!” The world is laughing at him even as he claims to be respected. That isn’t how respect works. The death toll would have been lower were it not for his ineptitude and it would have been higher but for coercive social distancing. The fact that it has worked so well will probably be its own undoing. “See, fewer people got sick and died. Let’s fill the planes and restaurants now that we know people won’t get sick!” Trump’s demitard base is following him right over the cliff.

          1. These people are scientists and doctors whose lives are spent trying how to find answers to medical questions.

            Appeal to magical authorities much? The “scientists and doctors” doing the reporting are political appointees. Fallacious thinking is fallacious thinking, you asshole. Yours is blatant.

            1. You realize there are scientists and doctors that don’t work for the government, right?

              1. I realize you’re retarded.

              2. Yes, but they aren’t the political appointees doing the reporting.

                It’s time you head back to Vox and join your friends in the kiddie-pool.

          2. The death toll would have been lower were it not for his ineptitude and it would have been higher but for coercive social distancing. The fact that it has worked so well will probably be its own undoing.

            Question-begging aside (wonder how all those pristine immune systems are going to react when the next wave hits), the fact that the goalposts keep getting moved on when these coercive measures can be lifted has likely been rather critical in leading to the perception that this isn’t about public health, but a thirsty power grab by Little Lord Fauntleroy officials.

            Doctors aren’t going to give two shits about how shelter-in-place orders affect the economy, until they have to lay off workers and shut down their practice, that is. They’re going to be autistically focused on how to beat the virus. But as past epidemics/pandemics show, trying to keep as many people as possible locked in indefinitely simply doesn’t work. You can mitigate the damage by identifying and isolating vectors such as nursing homes, but eventually a virus is either going to burn itself through the population, or it’s going to settle in a less lethal form until a vaccine is developed. And the continuing implication by the doomer faction that we have to keep as many people as possible sheltered indefinitely is simply exceptional; it cannot and will not happen.

          3. “These people are scientists and doctors”

            Eugene Gu is a doctor.

          4. The idea that epidemiologists would inflate the death toll

            Isn’t an idea. It’s a fact. There are countless press conferences wherein public health officials describe how the count in inflated. The inflation is a feature of the CDC guidelines for reporting on COVID-19.

            We have ‘presumed’ deaths from C19, assumed deaths from C19, we have deaths of people WITH C19 being counted as FROM C19.

            And all of this publicly explained in press conferences.

            Which means that the 57,000 number is inflated.

            Openly.

          5. “The idea that epidemiologists would inflate the death toll”

            But the people who are counting deaths aren’t epidemiologists. Same with much of the early modeling which was done by a physicist and a climatologist.

            But you already knew that, didn’t you, you dishonest fuck.

          6. Carl Heneghan, an epidemiologist and director of the Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine at the University of Oxford; in the April 1 edition of BBC Future stated: :
            “During an epidemic, doctors are more likely to attribute a death with complex causes as being caused by the disease in question – a trait known as ascertainment bias. We know, during an epidemic, people will call every death as though it’s related to Covid-19. But that is not the case,” says Heneghan. “Always, when people look back at the case notes and assign causation, they realise they will have overestimated the case fatality in relation to the disease.”
            The reason for the bias is that “there’s a tendency to focus on the worst-case scenario”, says Heneghan. “That’s the only message that gets out there.”
            One example is the H1N1 pandemic of 2009, known as swine flu. Early case fatality rate estimates were inflated by a factor of more than 10. Even 10 weeks into the epidemic, estimates varied widely between countries, coming in between 0.1% and 5.1%. When medics later had a chance to go through case documents and evaluate cases, the actual H1N1 case death rate was far lower, at 0.02%.https://www.bbc.com/future/article/20200401-coronavirus-why-death-and-mortality-rates-differ

            So, of the “experts” could screw it up this bad with a disease that did not come with this much political baggage, what makes you think they cannot/will not again.

            1. Thanks for the link. I didn’t know they missed so badly with their guesses on H1N1. I’d have liked to have known that around the time the lurid Imperial College models were being bandied about.

        2. //The man died as a result of a drug overdose while infected with COVID-19, a significant contributing condition, according to county spokeswoman Ashley Bautista. He is the youngest victim to die from the virus yet in the county.//

          https://www.google.com/amp/s/amp.vcstar.com/amp/3015868001

          Maybe, just maybe, they’re cooking the books a little bit.

      4. 50,000 in one month. Eighteen months for a vaccine. Yeah, I can imagine hitting the quarter million mark this year if the government fuckups continue.

        1. “50,000 in one month.”

          How do bell curves work.

          1. It’s not a bell curve. The initial portion is similar, but the tail is nothing like the bell curve. It is much flatter, declines more slowly, and asymptotically approaches zero. R is slowly, but constantly decreasing. That’s the ‘ideal’ case.

            In this case, because of social distancing that will likely decline as we open up, the tail is likely even flatter, and we could see second waves. There are still numerous unknowns like weather impact, immunity or second infections, mortality rates, etc.

            Making predictions is hard, especially about the future.

            1. Which has nothing to do with my point.

              1. Sorry dillinger that was me fucking around

                anyway, i appreciate the extremely aspie description, but your running your dicksucker about it not being a bell curve missed the actual point of my post

                so maybe in the future try to read for context instead of just sperging everywhere

            2. “It’s not a bell curve. ”

              It’s generally a sigmoid function for a virus.
              https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sigmoid_function

              But when graphed as case count over time, it’s pretty much a bell curve.

            3. Props where props are due: great deployment of a Yogi Berra quote.

        2. ok but you’re an idiot

        3. The “first case” was documented on January 21st. So try more like 3 months.

          I put that in quotations cause there is no way, just with the information that we have, that he was the actual first case in the US, seeing as how we’ve known of its existence since at least December and China was letting people travel to and from Wuhan internationally.

        4. At some point, we run out of 85 year old people.

    2. I want to know how many more deaths we need in order for DOL to be right about this pandemic changing human life expectancy.

      Probably, a lot, huh?

      1. For some reason, killing people near the currentife expectancy, especially sick ones with comorbidities, doesn’t move the needle much.

        Where is that dumbass DoL? He run away because he fell for that Russian loan idiocy?

        1. He’s posting as “Anti-trans libertarians are hurting the movement”

    3. C: What’s the infection fatality rate and the attack rate? Then make your own calculations. Some of mine assuming lowish IFRs are here.

      1. Yet you jumped to CFR to try and win against a criticism below. Fucking hilarious.

        1. The most amazing part is that Ron knows I read that article because that’s where I got the numbers I asked him about, but he dodges and points me to that article anyway.

          1. At least he didn’t refer you to an article by Sullum.

      2. By the way… “0.12 and 0.2 percent in Santa Clara County and between 0.1 percent and 0.3 percent in Los Angeles County. ” are no longer the lowish estimates. Some are now below 0.1.

      3. Would you answer and not dodge if I said please?

    4. In Canada, our Master Clowns said we could see 44 000 deaths by the end of the month. We’re at 2852. We’ve got two days to make that happen.

      1. Better get to killin’.

      2. They clearly aren’t counting enough dubious cases yet.

  3. The “Testing Blueprint” places the primary responsibility on the states to fund and vastly expand coronavirus testing.

    Seems reasonable. States have not been hit uniformly and the federal government’s failings have been stated in this very article. In fact, governors should be taking a greater role anyway. They presumably know their respective states’ needs better than D.C. State capitals whining to/about the federal response is terrible governance.

    1. I think it would be interesting to go back and look at how disaster response has essentially neutered the ability for states to manage their own affairs. After decades of hurricane and earthquake and tornado disaster relief, states have essentially ceded those duties to the federal government. Which is great, until the disaster hits everywhere in the country.

      States have been too happy to rob their disaster preparedness budgets for other purposes, all under the assumption the Fed would be there to save them with a simple Declaration of Emergency. Well this has put paid to that notion, and it is time for the state governments to wake up to that.

      1. Interesting you bring that up. In Italy I’ve read their system is directed at natural disasters. So when the CCP virus hit, the system wasn’t ready for it.

    2. You suggest that the federal government is not all-powerful and all responsible on a libertarian website? How DARE you?

    3. They presumably know their respective states’ needs better than D.C.

      In theory, sure.

      1. Absolutely. Trump knows all, sees all. It is known.

    4. Yeah, that seemed like kind of a strange criticism to make on an ostensibly libertarian website. I would think federalism would be a good thing, especially given the disparate needs of the various states.

      1. Bailey is a transhumanist, thus necessarily a believer in central planning… thus a progressive

        1. I thought he just suffered from acute TDS. I mean, he correctly points out all the early failings of the FDA and CDC, but it’s clear he’s just gonna go against anything Trump says.

          1. Most intelligent people do.

            1. And you do too.

            2. Most intelligent stupid people do.

              You spelled ‘stupid’ wrong.

              But that’s expected.

              Because you suffer from acute TDS.

          2. “I thought he just suffered from acute TDS. I mean, he correctly points out all the early failings of the FDA and CDC, but it’s clear he’s just gonna go against anything Trump says”

            You’re not wrong.
            Both things can be true

        2. You know plenty of transhuminsts are ancap, and vice-versa right?

          1. Think about what transhumanism is

            1. And what it says

              1. They are Utopians one and all.

                1. Utopians who explicitly believe in the supremacy of central planning and reject natural (unconscious) development

                  1. … no. All the transhumanists I can think of are radical individualists. None of them are central planners.

        3. I’m not sure you know what transhumanism is.

  4. For its part, the federal government says it will provide a “Blueprint for the testing plans and rapid response programs,” which basically means that the “Testing Blueprint” will provide a blueprint.

    “The Secretary will arrange to develop appropriate guidelines.”

  5. 1) Regarding the amount of tests conducted, I think you are stealing a base here. We were DEFINITELY slow in developing tests. However by April it was clear that there were 4 or 5 places that needed testing, while the rest of the country did not need any testing at all. We were slow to get that final push to 5 Million not because of supply, but because of the lack of demand. The urgent care next to my house (here in Orange County) has had a testing station out front for the past 4 weeks. Every time I go out to lunch, or walking with the kids, or to the store- several times a week- I pass the testing station. I have NEVER ONCE seen it in active use, where someone goes in, they pull the curtains and test.

    2) This shows just how important it is for the blueprint to say what it does. The response to this- or any- contagion is just plain different depending on where you are. New York needs to test differently than Orange County. They need to staff differently. They need different tools. It may be “letting Trump off the hook” but so is expecting states to handle their own police force.

    1. The response to this- or any- contagion is just plain different depending on where you are.

      That’s just crazy talk, O. We’re all in it together.™

  6. “Ultimately, the “Testing Blueprint” is not much more than a list of sensible recommendations that may well be marginally helpful to state governments as they deal with the pandemic going forward.”

    This is truly a disaster. I too wonder like, just like Ron Bailey, why isn’t the federal government doing more.

    1. Like less isn’t more in a bureaucracy? Be careful what you wish for.

  7. https://twitter.com/AlexBerenson/status/1255141330658848772

    1/ From a physician in Michigan – his testing site is running at less than half its daily capacity (and two other nearby sites have closed). THERE IS NOT EVEN ENOUGN DEMAND FOR CURRENT TESTS BECAUSE SO FEW PEOPLE ARE SYMPTOMATIC.

    2/ If you don’t want to read the emails, this live (~1 hour ago) photo from a Virginia testing site tells the story. THE LACK OF TESTING DEMAND IS THIS WEEK’S VERSION OF THE EMPTY HOSPITALS FROM THREE WEEKS AGO; it tells the key story about where the “epidemic” is headed.

    1. https://twitter.com/AlexBerenson/status/1255085325166301185

      Lolcatz. What does this even mean? The testing centers are empty and anyone who wants a test and has any reason to have one can. The hospitals are half-empty and going broke. The testing fetish is so obviously a way to delay reopening it barely requires further discussion.

      The call for endless testing is the last refuge of Team Apocalypse. And it isn’t going to work. The apocalypse came and went and 99.99.% of us under 85 are still alive.

      1. Your familiarity with pandemic management and health care facility operations seems strong.

        Do you work at an auto parts counter, handling the coding for video game exchange websites, for your parents’ animal feed store, or on the evening shift at an Ayn Rand reading room?

        1. In either of those scenarios, he’s providing more economic and social value than you are, you slack-jawed, slope-foreheaded hicklib.

        2. Oh look. Kirkland is sheep who only listens to Dr. Fauci.

          Aw, so cute. Quelle surprise.

          No room for independent thought with shitheads like Kirkland! He’ll press that independent thought control faster than Chris Adams draws the gun.

          1. Yeah, Fauci doesn’t know what the hell he is talking about. The fool predicted 60,000 deaths by August. That’s preposterous!

            1. Was that his first or dozenth prediction?

              But by all means suck his cock more.

              1. The important thing isn’t what you say — it is that you can say anything at all with your tongue affixed to Trump’s scrotum.

            2. Didn’t he originally postulate millions of deaths?

            3. Ok, but what did he say in January and February instead of last week goober?

        3. Ooohhhh……. Arty thinks he’s clever now. So thats one person who thinks so.

      2. R: You might want to compare Sweden’s confirmed cases and deaths so far with those of South Korea. Sweden: 19,621 cases/2,355 dead vs. S.Korea: 10,752 cases/244 dead. I will also point out that South Korea has five times more people and that it did not lockdown.

        1. If Sweden and S. Korea survived without a lockdown, and American hospitals are laying off people for lack of patients, and we have more available tests than people bothering to get tested, can we end the goddam thing now?

        2. Why did you immediately jump to CFR instead of estimated IFR? Is it because you knew testing would make the denominator bigger you dishonest hack?

        3. “R: You might want to compare Sweden’s confirmed cases and deaths so far with those of South Korea. Sweden: 19,621 cases/2,355 dead vs. S.Korea: 10,752 cases/244 dead. I will also point out that South Korea has five times more people and that it did not lockdown.”

          Yes, I think we get it- Korea was AWESOME. But they were also largely atypical. Most of the western world is in a similar boat, of being at “flu level” or “2x Flu Level” numbers. That includes Germany, despite their awesome testing, who sits at around 74 deaths per million.

          I totally agree that the US could learn a lot from Korea. I still remain skeptical that we could have scaled to the levels necessary to respond like Korea, but it is a possibility. Yet, our response has been similar to that of Sweden and of other countries in Europe. We are doing worse than some, and better than others.

          That tells us that testing is a silver bullet, ONLY if you get it perfect. One or two misteps and you could be Germany. Or the US. Or Belgium. Or Sweden. So if testing didn’t work, what is the next answer?

          1. Never forget that Korea has a dearth of elderly, and a median age substantially lower than that of most developed countries.

            They dodged a bullet that mainly kills the elderly by not having a large target population.

        4. Sounds like the South Koreans know how to science better than anybody else and they don’t speculate as to cause of death. Maybe because they know the Chinese are breathing down their necks.

          1. They’re also far more culturally homogeneous than Americans, are way more willing to cede autonomy to achieve some collective goal—imagine trying in the US, the contact-tracing methods the Koreans use—and will actually follow public health guidelines for disease control. They wash their hands. They wear surgical masks when they get sick. They won’t break a quarantine. Reading reports from people with relatives back in the home country have been interesting; things like, “Dad hasn’t left the house in six weeks, it’s your turn to send him a care package, Sis.”

            This, in addition to the scale-up equals screwed-up issues mentioned upthread.

            SK isn’t that analogous for figuring out how the US should’ve weathered this thing. Can you imagine the butthurt here by the writers if, e.g., Trump had argued for an immediate travel ban from China pre Lunar New Year, instituted mandatory health screening at all ports of entry, heavy test kit deployment to all hospitals, and asked the NSA to work with Google to trace everyone who’d come near a positive Covid patient for the last two weeks? IOW, “Be more like South Korea.”

            Gillespie would’ve had a stroke.

        5. The thing about Sweden that will be interesting is once the tally will be up is not how worse the numbers will be. The question will be if the difference between countries like Sweden, Norway, etc. will have justified the lockdown.

          As of now, it’s looking like an emphatic no.

          I don’t get all this quarantining of health people and the social distancing seems like a futile exercise in sheep herding if you ask me.

          The virus is out there. /cue

    2. Obviously the people dont want to reopen the economy of they arent getting tested hourly.

  8. ‘Life Has to Go On’: How Sweden Has Faced the Virus Without a Lockdown
    The country was an outlier in Europe, trusting its people to voluntarily follow the protocols. Many haven’t, but it does not seem to have hurt them.

    https://www.nytimes.com/2020/04/28/world/europe/sweden-coronavirus-herd-immunity.html

    Sweden’s death rate of 22 per 100,000 people is the same as that of Ireland, which has earned accolades for its handling of the pandemic, and far better than in Britain or France.

    Yet, on this warm spring day, at least, there was little evidence that people were observing the protocols — adding further mystery to Sweden’s apparent success in handling the scourge without an economically devastating lockdown.

    All around Ms. Lilja along Skanegatan Street in the Sodermalm neighborhood of Stockholm, younger Swedes thronged bars, restaurants and a crowded park last week, drinking in the sun.

    They laughed and basked in freedoms considered normal in most parts of the world not long ago, before coronavirus lockdowns, quarantines and mass restrictions upended social norms. As other nations in Europe begin to consider reopening their economies, Sweden’s experience would seem to argue for less caution, not more.

    “My respect for those who died, but we are doing something right here in Sweden,” said Johan Mattsson, 44, as he was having a drink at a cafe on Skanegatan Street.

    1. While other countries were slamming on the brakes, Sweden kept its borders open, allowed restaurants and bars to keep serving, left preschools and grade schools in session and placed no limits on public transport or outings in local parks. Hairdressers, yoga studios, gyms and even some cinemas have remained open.

      Gatherings of more than 50 people are banned. Museums have closed and sporting events have been canceled. At the end of March, the authorities banned visits to nursing homes.

      That’s roughly it. There are almost no fines, and police officers can only ask people to oblige. Pedestrians wearing masks are generally stared at as if they have just landed from Mars.

      1. Sweden also has nationalized healthcare, a system that would also not work for the USA.

        1. Nationalized health care at most impacts getting care after infection. Our death rate per million isn’t a particular disaster, and who pays for the doctors doesn’t block a virus from getting into your lungs.

            1. Interesting.

            2. “Further, it is likely that Sweden will not experience a second wave of the virus since it appears that they can continue their current lifestyle without serious economic implications until a cure of vaccine is found, which is exactly what we need in the US.”
              I would add the lockdowns have created a situation where far fewer individuals will develop immunities to this and other viruses. We have a generation who already prefer to communicate on social media instead of in person because human beings are really scary. Now they’ve learned that you’re likely to drop dead if you pass within 6 feet of another person. You can’t develop immunities if you’re not exposed to viruses and bacteria good and bad. And the government can’t pull vaccines out of it’s ass for every possible illness. There is no doubt the species will survive this mini epidemic. I’m not so sure about the ext one.

          1. Coronavirus (COVID-19) Global Deaths
            https://www.realclearpolitics.com/coronavirus/

        2. No, it doesn’t. Sweden has a public healthcare system operating at the county level and paid for by local taxes, with public service providers. None of the proponents of single payer healthcare in the US have proposed anything similar. And if they had, it wouldn’t work.

          In any case, the Swedish healthcare system is not responsible for low COVID-19 infection or death rates in Sweden. Furthermore, the Swedish healthcare system does not have better outcomes than the American system.

        3. “Sweden also has nationalized healthcare, a system that would also not work for the USA.”

          Gawd people are so predictable. I called this weeks ago when the usual suspects were still cheerleading every Swedish death, to justify their lockdown obsession. And here we are now. Sweden doesn’t count because of national healthcare- how that is different from UK, Italy, Spain or other nationalized health care systems is not explained. Next it will be how Sweden’s demographics are different.

          The fact remains that Sweden is on track to be around 2.5-3x a typical flu season. The US is probably going to be in a similar boat. (Note that the US’s flu seasons are more deadly than Swedish). We are comparing each country TO ITS OWN POPULATIONS. There is no reason why Sweden cannot be compared to Sweden.

        4. So are we ignoring the other nationalized healthcare systems? Was that the point of your comment?

      2. Well they will surely all die!

    2. For FUCK’S sake. There are actual sources in the actual Sweden. That deal in facts about what is happening in – you know – the ACTUAL SWEDEN. some of those have even been translated into English so you don’t need google translate to convert the borkborkborks.

      Americans are so fucking stupid and blinkered and agenda-driven.

  9. it’s gonna burn off before Leviathan get its evil Test Everybody! plans in order

  10. Tell me first why testing people is the president’s responsibilty. In my neighborhood, queen, ny, there is one testing site and they have nothing to do.

    1. Exactly. This is a supposedly libertarian magazine asking for the feds to step in and take more power. For no reason because this is not the crisis they claimed it would be.

      But it gets eyeballs on the ads.

      1. Where did Bailey ask for the feds to step in and take more power? This article read more like a criticism of the feds and their failings.

        Or is this comment an argument that a national pandemic isn’t something that a limited but competent federal government should deal with? If that’s what you mean, I disagree and I’m not sure how any reasonable person wouldn’t expect a federal government response, regardless of your political affiliation (I suppose anarchists might disagree).

        1. “Where did Bailey ask for the feds to step in and take more power? This article read more like a criticism of the feds and their failings.”

          He specifically criticizes the “Blueprint” because it tells the states to plan for testing and contact tracing.

          1. I think governors should quit if they can’t make a plan for testing and contact tracing. What are they doing? Whining, asking for unnecessary ventilators, complaining, make ‘executive orders’ that violates the constitution. FED can supply and help, especially all the states are broke. What I like to know is that, yes it could be the President’s responsibility to do something about the testing. But what’s the legal reason why that’s his job. There gotta be a clear written law that something is someone’s responsibility and everyone in the left (I voted for Chelsea mom and never voted for republicans) think it is, and governors are all over people’s freedom (and yet again, it violates constitution) So what is the basis for all of these? If testing is up to FED entirely, and States can’t pay police, firemen, teachers and etc, I want the state government to go away and I want Governors to be fired. They have no use for people.

        2. So you skipped right over this:
          The “Testing Blueprint,” meanwhile, makes it clear that the Trump administration will blame states and localities for any future failures with respect to diagnostic and antibody testing and contact tracing.

          Where bailey criticizes the president for pushing federalism?

    2. The President is supposed to personally conduct each test himself. Anything else is an attempt to “avoid responsibility”.

  11. Is there any evidence that the differences between Korea and the US are due to testing, rather than any of the other million fundamental differences between the two countries?

    And in what way are the failures of the CDC and the FDA Trump’s fault? The CDC and the FDA are the supposed experts on this; do you or do you not want Trump to follow the advice of scientific experts?

    Finally, you say that Trump’s program is mostly “hortatory”. Yes, it is: that’s the way the US works.

    Trump largely did what scientific experts told him to do, and if anything, he’s been more cautious. He doesn’t need to “avoid responsibility”.

    Ron, give up the science reporting beat, you really have no credibility left. You’re deranged with partisanship and ideology.

    1. “Is there any evidence that the differences between Korea and the US are due to testing, rather than any of the other million fundamental differences between the two countries?”

      I think that you can probably give a lot of credit to the Korean testing regime. I was reading some great articles about what they were doing there. Someone tests positive, and they immediately test their entire apartment building. And the floors above and below the floors where that person works. And they do it multiple times.

      The question that Mr Bailey doesn’t answer is whether the US could have possibly implemented a similar regime in the US. It isn’t a matter of just taking the number of tests and scaling it by a factor of our Population. 70% of Korea’s population lives in 3 cities. They have just two international airports to guard against entry into the country. This alone simplifies a lot of the testing logistics.

      Not only would the US have had to do 6x more tests, but we’d have had to distribute it to 75x more airports (we have 150 international airports). And across 100x the square miles of land. In the first few weeks of testing, Korea tested thousands of people, which is great, but the US would have had to test 10s of thousands.

      I work in a big technology company. Going from 100,000 customers per second to 1,000,000 customers per second doesn’t just require 10x the equipment. It requires whole new scaling technologies. The same is true in scaling our testing above that of Korea.

      The genetic tracing of this virus shows that it got to the west coast early on from china, but then trump shut down that travel. What ravaged the east coast was travel from Europe that entered from multiple other places. And this was further complicated by millions of college students all traveling back home as their campuses closed down. These were all problems that Korea and even Germany did not have to contend with.

      1. I think that you can probably give a lot of credit to the Korean testing regime. I was reading some great articles about what they were doing there. Someone tests positive, and they immediately test their entire apartment building. And the floors above and below the floors where that person works. And they do it multiple times. The question that Mr Bailey doesn’t answer is whether the US could have possibly implemented a similar regime in the US

        I think you are saying the same thing I’m saying: it’s not the availability of tests that accounts for the difference between the two countries, but other factors. That is, even if tests had been as widely available as in Korea, it would likely still not have made a difference. So the discussion of why we didn’t have a lot of tests in the US is pretty much immaterial.

      2. Bailey has never done anything real or had a hand in making a product or even thought about the complexities of scaling large web apps,etc. So he will not understand what you are talking about.

  12. Some people are hopeful this CCPVirus scare won’t lead to any permanent changes in society and commerce. Counterpoint: look at how air travel has changed since the first hijacking and then 9/11.
    No, things will change. One I heard floated on tv was that all 330 million of us will be wearing a “fitbit” gadget that will let us know when we are getting sick and report said diagnosis to “the authorities” who can then warn everyone with whom we came in contact. I don’t think the monitoring will get quite that strict, but do expect many businesses will be doing temperature monitoring before allowing customers or employees to enter premises.

    1. Most likely end result is that we are now willing to wear masks out in public like they do in Asia. Not the end of the world, freedom wise or civil rights wise. Besides, it might fuck w/ government face recognition software.

      1. Some pussy, participation trophy winning, chicken littles may be willing. I dont see much of it here outside the Betas and old people you would expect. Surprisingly few Karen’s in Southern Az.

        1. It’s like you are actively seeking to prevent people from agreeing with you.

        2. I’ll wear a mask in public if it will keep the Feds and the State Authorities off our backs and continue to open up the economy. Once this is over over, I’ll never wear another mask in public. I’m 62 but extremely healthy with nary a hint of metabolic syndrome.

  13. 79% of all COVID-19 deaths in the US are in the 65+ age bracket.

    1. So we just kill the old people and stop worrying about it?

      1. “We” don’t do anything. Old people can choose to stay at home, or they can choose to go out. It’s none of your business, or Trump’s business, or any governor’s business.

        See, many people in their 70’s and 80’s would rather not spend the last few months or years of their life cowering in fear, locked in their own homes. So, for that matter, would many people of any age.

        You don’t have a right to imprison 80% of the population because you can’t deal with the reality of your own mortality. Grow up, man.

        1. Amen.

        2. “See, many people in their 70’s and 80’s would rather not spend the last few months or years of their life cowering in fear, locked in their own homes.”
          My father will turn 90 next month and I would really like to visit him with the siblings, grandkids and great grandkids. But he lives at an assisted living home in Michigan and I’m prohibited from entering. He’d much rather see his family than live to be 100 in isolation. If this lunacy goes on much longer I may never get the chance to see him again.

          1. My wife runs an ALF. The social isolation is really taking a toll on the residents. We are saving them one disease, but destroying what life they have left in the process.

            Although, I cannot fault them either. When COVID does get into your building you can lose up to a third of your residents and this is largely seen as being entirely your fault by both the government that regulates you and the population that will sue you.

        3. “You don’t have a right to imprison 80% of the population because you can’t deal with the reality of your own mortality. Grow up, man.”

          A message I try to convey to the yahoos as National Review. Given that we didn’t respond like Sweden, it is time to just adopt some sensible protocols and deal with the death rate/consequences.

  14. The administration’s timeline amounts largely to an attempt to put a positive spin on the manifold failures of federal agencies to address the COVID-19 pandemic under the leadership of President Trump.

    No shit. Did anyone actually expect anything else?

    1. Libertarian sites that usually prefer federalist measures usually dont pine for authoritarian and statist measures.

      1. What libertarian site? I’d like to visit such site.

  15. The “Testing Blueprint” places the primary responsibility on the states to fund and vastly expand coronavirus testing.

    Perhaps Mr. Bailey would like to explain why this should not be the case, considering he works for a libertarian-oriented publication.

    Mr. Bailey…State your case. Why shouldn’t the primary responsibility be on the states to fund and expand coronavirus testing?

    1. Orange man is practicing federalism which makes it bad.

    2. Bailey has no libertarian leanings. He has no particular understanding of libertarianism. He is here to slam Trump, and plug his shitty books.

  16. Key points. The Korean outbreak largely correlated with a specific religious organization. The Korean government demanded that this organization turn over their confidential membership list, and then used that to hunt down members and test them.

    What could possibly go wrong?

    In other news, Orange man bad because federal bureaucracy is bureaucratic.

    Meanwhile in Sweden:

    What the crisis has shown is that we need to do some serious thinking about nursing homes because they have been so open to transmission (more than a third of Sweden’s COVID-19 fatalities have been reported in nursing homes) of the disease and we had such a hard time controlling it in that setting. However, this is only indirectly related to our strategy because the strategy was to protect those people and that part of it did not work out. This is perhaps not a surprise because there has always been a problem with running these homes safely in Sweden going back a long time. That’s something we are taking advice on now and that we intend to do better on.

    (Editor’s note: Sweden has a population of 10 million people, about twice as large as its nearest Scandinavian neighbors. As of April 28, the country’s COVID-19 death toll reached 2,274, about five times higher than in Denmark and 11 times higher than in Norway, according to John Hopkins University’s coronavirus tracker.)

    https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/world/2020/04/28/coronavirus-covid-19-sweden-anders-tegnell-herd-immunity/3031536001/

    So… those of us advocating the Sweden model, are advocating a 5-10x increase in the death rate? It depends. Are people dying that would not have died during a flatter curve? Are we going to have better antivirals in 6 months that would have saved them? Lots of clinical trials underway that will read out in 2 months or so.

    1. “So… those of us advocating the Sweden model, are advocating a 5-10x increase in the death rate? It depends. Are people dying that would not have died during a flatter curve? Are we going to have better antivirals in 6 months that would have saved them? Lots of clinical trials underway that will read out in 2 months or so.”

      People who compare Sweden to Norway (But not the netherlands) are being disingenuous. Of course, when you lock down a country, you slow the rate of deaths- that is the point of “flattening the curve”. The question is, at what cost. Compare Sweden’s COVID death toll to a bad flu year for Sweden, and things are a little different. They are currently at around 2.5x the number of deaths from a typical flu year. And they have a largely intact economy.

      Yes, instead of 999,200 people being alive and well, there are 998,000 people alive and well. The question is whether it was worth allowing those close to a million people to keep their jobs. I think so.

      1. Sweden has, ballpark, double the population of either Denmark or Norway. Moreover, AIUI, a decent chunk of the cases and deaths in Sweden come from their refugee/newcomer population, most of whom don’t practice social distancing (nor could likely spell it in Swedish). Thought that Sweden had a much higher proportion of refugees than did the Danes or Norwegians?

        So that alone might explain the greater numbers of deaths.

        1. And I see the double the population already got mentioned.

          What’s the Covid death rate in Sweden, and how does it compare to a bad flu season?

          1. Sweden has 10MM people, and 12K+ dead. The People’s Republic of NJ has 9MM people, and 6K+ dead. You do the math.

            Which strategy was more immediately lethal?

            1. They don’t announce the winner at halftime. If Sweden has reached herd immunity, they might be done with deaths. NJ will still be digging graves.

              Flattening the curve prolongs the time to herd immunity.

            2. Is worldometers on a bunch of crack then? They list 2462 total deaths in the country. https://www.worldometers.info/coronavirus/country/sweden/

              Which is a bit different than 12k. Where did that number come from?

              New cases look like they’re still ticking along in the fat part of the curve, so I don’t think they’re quite at herd immunity yet.

              Still, let’s assume the 12k number is right. If they shut down everything in the way that US public health officials in early April wanted, what would that number be instead. And are the extra deaths—of people who statistically were going to die within the next five years anyway—-worth not driving their economy into 20% plus unemployment and possibly another Great Depression?

    2. I think that realistically the area under the curve is more or less predetermined. Assuming critical cases don’t exceed the resources to manage them, I don’t see how expanding the length of the curve will have any effect. The disease will not disappear no matter how long the government attempts to put the population on house arrest. The question is how quickly is too quickly to expose the majority of the population to it and begin to develop herd immunity.
      Reason and the media keep claiming that Trump has completely botched the response. From what I’ve seen, Trump did ok. Congress used it as an opportunity to spend an insane amount of money without complaint. Governors have done a shit job. New York has absolutely fucked up in every regard. As I see it, Trump’s mistake was encouraging temporary authoritarianism because the governors have gone overboard and now don’t want to listen to advice to reign it back in

      1. “New York has absolutely fucked up in every regard.”

        Again, looking at worldometers’s info for the US: https://www.worldometers.info/coronavirus/country/us/

        It’s obvious that the a giant proportion of this disease in the US is contained within NY, and some in NJ. Probably those parts of Jersey near NY. In that state, it’s been a bitch. And should cause any thought of Cuomo being the nominee for President to get immediately laughed out of the room.

        Everywhere else? Not so much. The fallout from the economy getting shot in the leg with it’s own hunting rifle, is going to cause far more death and destruction than that bug will.

        1. Autocorrect has a lot of balls, changing ‘its’ to it’s, and then whining at me that the grammar is incorrect.

  17. You forgot to mention that not only does this strange new respect for federalism, after his declaration that he alone, as Precedent, was Decider in Chief for all of the United States, allow him to deny responsibility for anything that goes wrong and shift the blame to the individual governors (those dumbasses that didn’t do things the way he would have done it and they really should have listened to him, he certainly wouldn’t have made a hash of things the way those sad failed losers who, by the way, are stupid and ugly and nobody likes them – have you seen how low their ratings are? – did) but it also allows him to take credit for anything that works out well because he’s the one who told them to do that. But that’s just the way politicians work. I was for the war before I was against it. Whatever was popular I was for, whatever was unpopular I was against.

    The larger issue is that this wasn’t “the Trump Administration” that failed here, unless you’re going to blame Trump for not fixing the whole damn bureaucratic mess that is the Federal government, it was the government bureaucracy itself that fails over and over and over to do its job and yet somehow is rewarded for its failure. Failing to do its job is somehow proof that it needs a bigger budget, more staff and more power. Several different agencies and several different programs have been created and funded specifically to deal with a biological threat such as this – as a defense against a Red Chinese and then a Soviet and, since 2001, a Muslim biological weapons attack – and the upshot of all their preparations seems to have been “when the time comes, we’ll let Trump take care of it, he loves taking care of shit”. And Trump of course obliges them by being a fat-headed loudmouthed know-it-all who can’t resist making it all about “Me, me, me” no matter how stupid it makes him look.

    Of course, for all the concern-trolling the press does about “why are we listening to this fat-headed moron Trump who doesn’t know anything when we should be listening to the experts like Drs. Fauci and Brix?” you know goddamn well if Fauci and Brix called a press conference, they’d get two reporters showing up and they’d both be asking the same question – “Where’s Trump?” because Trump and the Fake News media have this sick, twisted, perverted love/hate relationship where each knows the other is indispensable to their success. Moby Dick needed his Captain Ahab as much as the Captain needed his white whale because nobody’s going to write a book about just a fish any more than they’re going to write a book about just a fisherman. And you just know that when Melania is back in New York, Rachel Maddow sneaks into the White House and she and Trump anger-fuck each other’s brains out on the Resolute desk, and they each scream their own names out when they climax.

    1. I would like to subscribe to your newsletter, sir. Especially if it has a lot more of that last few sentences of ANALysis.

    2. My question: Why hasn’t Trump fired anyone at the CDC or FDA? Certainly heads need to roll.

  18. ‘an “alternative facts” narrative that aims to direct attention away from the egregious mistakes that the Trump administration committed with respect to diagnostic testing as the pandemic began to accelerate in January and February 2020.’

    Although Covid-19 (Chop Sticks-Flu for the layperson) does not know prejudice for under which president it chose to show its ugly head under (or maybe it does), I like the way Reason made sure that they made it clear that this pandemic happened under Trump’s watch 2020!

  19. Questions for the author:
    So basically you believe Trump is responsible for China lying?
    So basically you believe Trump is responsible for WHO covering up the situation in China until the virus was out all over the world?
    So basically you believe Trump is responsible for the incompetence of the CDC which is a bureaucracy, that was there long before Trump was President, and will be there long after Trump is gone?
    So basically you believe Trump is responsible for because the states Governors did nothing but sit on their hands until it was to late?
    Do you believe Hillary would have done better? Joe Biden? Bernie Sanders? Nancy Pelosi? Chuck Schumer? Adam Schiff? I just want to know where the author stands?

    1. Also he did a bad job when he personally designed that original CDC test. His nucleic acid mojo is weak. Other politicians are good at designing disease test kits.

  20. JesseAZ, let me tell you about The People’s Republic of New Jersey. It is a sorry saga.

    Our Governor, Phailing Phil Murphy is a Jersey Special. This Goldman Sachs reject is completely and utterly incompetent. He could not manage his way out of an open paper bag. I have never seen anything like it in my entire adult life. We have been paying the price in lives lost for Phil’s Phuckups for a while now. His Health Commissar, Judith M. Persichilli is equally incompetent. Why do I say this? Let’s talk about testing: physical testing and test sites, and delivery of results to people who are tested. Phailing Phil and his Phuckups have been ‘addressing the testing issues’ for a month-plus. Over a month. After a month-plus of concentrated and focused effort, Phailing Phil and his team have accomplished:

    No meaningful gain in tests/day, with test sites running out of tests within a few hours, test centers not able to open for testing, and no tests available. This….after a month-plus of effort. There is stilla 10-day delay in getting test results. That is essentially unchanged from a month ago. So you get a test (maybe, if the center has not run out), and then you wait. And wait. And wait some more.

    This is the most incompetently run effort I have ever seen. And I have seen a lot. The way I said it to a friend in synagogue…this is just gross incompetence, which is 144X worse than just run of the mill incompetence.

    A second sorry aspect of this saga is the People’s Republic of NJ Duma. They have completely abdicated all semblance of acting as an independent branch of government. Phailing Phil issues EOs restricting our civil liberties for ‘an indeterminate amount of time’, and these stupid bastards in the Duma said, “Ok”. What?! No time limit?

    Finally, the cherry on top is our People’s Revolutionary Supreme Court. The Chief Justice closed all of the People’s Republic courts, so there is no way to appeal what are plainly unconstitutional measures. The NJSC has endorsed waiving away our civil rights by closing the courts. We’re fucked.

    And we deserve it. We elected these people.

    1. This is why some people want a national strategy. Right now in these difficult times, NJ people may support Murphy. But sooner or later the truth comes out and it’s going to bite them in their rear, like Cuomo. So to avoid this, they need a scapegoat and that should be Trump, hence a national strategy. If there is such a national strategy, then the policy that results in mistakes in NY nursing home is universal and we are in a deeper hole. In consequence, we would have to live in deeper fear and they will control us even more.

  21. From dodging the draft, to dodging debts and other business responsibilities, to dodging marital responsibilities, to dodging direct confrontations, to dodging protestors, to dodging debates in both the primary and general election, to dodging policy fights, on to this dodging of responsibility for his drastic pandemic response failures; despite much noise about his inconsistency, Trump is remarkably consistent, over many decades, in his abject cowardice.

    “No, I don’t take responsibility at all,” ~ Donald Trump
    https://www.forbes.com/sites/lisettevoytko/2020/03/13/trump-no-i-dont-take-responsibility-for-botched-coronavirus-testing-rollout/#4f64b10246f0

    Trump’s false bravado and refusal to accept blame are symptoms of Trump’s abject and consistent cowardice.

    1. Sounds he’s living rent free in your empty head. Obsessiveness and hostility are not good qualities for you.

      Here’s the thing chump. He’s the president, and you’re a bitchy and whiny semi anonymous poster on a forum no one really reads.

      He will be reelected, and your head like others will explode.

      1. pseudonymous

        That means false name. Anonymous is no name.

        1. Read the whole thing, fucktard

          https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anonymity

    2. dodging debates in both the primary and general election,

      Hahaha!!! The debates won him both the nom and the Presidency.

      TDS is strong in this one.

    3. Who cares! This mystery virus scare is a HOAX. That’s all that matters. HOAX. My problem with Trump is that he refuses to call this crap what it is….a HOAX!

  22. Seems terribly unfair comparing America with countries that have their shit together like Germany or South Korea.

    South Korean presidents are motivated not to be too corrupt or incompetent. The current president’s predecessor, Pak, was impeached and is currently in jail. Her predecessor, Lee, was only tried, convicted and jailed after his term had expired. As I say, some countries have their shit together.

    1. “South Korean presidents are motivated not to be too corrupt or incompetent.”

      I assume this is sarcasm?

      1. South Korean presidents face a spell in prison if caught. I know of at least four from the past 2 or 3 decades who’ve been sent to jail. American presidents are not held to account for their misdeeds and they don’t hold their predecessors to account, either. So, no, this is not sarcasm. America is simply not in the same league as South Korea or Germany, and the comparison is unfair.

    2. Hahahahaha. Fuck you’re stupid.

      1. Laugh while you can, Monkee boy.

    3. You don’t actually know anything about Germany is South Korea, do you?

      1. More than you, evidently.

  23. The only thing this article shows is that Ronald Bailey has a hate-filled hardon for Trump. One that he needs relieve the pressure from.

  24. I don’t get this Karen thing. Who is Karen and why do you fellas hate her? I have known a few and they were just like any other woman.

    1. Not this Karen.

      1. Oh

        I’ll see your Karen and raise you a Melinda and a Suzanne.

        1. That’s a string raise.

          1. Busted again.

            Same thing happened with Suzanne.

            1. At least you still have karen

              1. Karen is the new Becky.

  25. States and media and politicians wanted a guide they got a guide whats the problem. Its Trump not the guide its just because Trump

  26. Is it really plausible that

    (1) Donald Trump and or the federal government would have the foresight to drop CDC and FDA regulation (the CDC, not Donald Trump, is responsible for testing) in February to ramp up testing

    and

    (2) Millions of Americans would have flocked to testing sites in February when the media, governors and Donald Trump insisted that this was another flu?

    The answer is probably no. America was not used to dealing with bird flus and spread of disease that occasionally strikes Asia or Africa. When the worst of it hit them, they were caught flat footed. Taiwan and Korea already dealt with smaller outbreaks and had certain protocols in place, and their people already had a culture of wearing masks. Almost no one wore masks here prior to covid.

    TBH we were tantalizingly close to maybe dodging the worst of the crisis if FL, NY and Louisiana shut things down a week earlier than they did and cancel big gatherings like spring break and Mardi Gras. Our first deaths were nursing homes in the west coast and those states have the situation under control by now. New York is still sending infected elderly to nursing homes. I have no idea what’s going on in that state.

  27. Makes $140 to $180 consistently online work and I got $16894 in one month electronic acting from home.I am a step by step understudy and work essentially one to two or three hours in my additional time.Everybody will complete that obligation and monline akes extra cash by simply open this link……
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  28. Perhaps Mr. Bailey is trying out for a position at the Washington Post.

  29. No testing needed. Stop wasting time and my money on such idiocy. There’s no need for tests for a hoax. It’s obvious this mystery virus scare is a GIANT GOVERNMENT HOAX! I wish Trump would just come out and say it.

  30. I think trump is againt the ropes on this case, he should understand the situation once for all. Is obvious…

  31. The incompetence of CDC and the federales in this is just convincing me that the entire public health function should be moved out of the executive branch and into an interstate compact form. This is just like everything else where the states are the ones that implement things.

    Beyond the constitutional requirement that Congress create the basic structure – and the constitutionally acceptable approach that the feds can fund it (ie distribute the ‘US dollar’ through that vehicle rather than strictly through a primary dealer window); there is no value whatsoever in the DC bureaucrats and their politically minded bosses managing anything.

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