Documentary

Errol Morris Is Fascinated by and Terrified of Steve Bannon

The decorated filmmaker didn't expect the dramatic reaction to his "toxic" documentary about Trump's former aide-de-camp.

|

Roger Ebert once called documentary director Errol Morris "as great a filmmaker as Hitchcock or Fellini."

In keeping with that assessment, Morris received an ovation when he debuted American Dharma, his documentary about former Trump adviser Stephen Bannon, at the Venice Film Festival in 2018. But after early reviewers accused the Oscar-winning director of going too easy on the onetime head of the alt-light website Breitbart, Morris—a self-described liberal who says he was shocked to discover people thought he was promoting rather than exposing Bannon's views—found it impossible to get a distribution deal in the United States. It was the first time in decades that the acclaimed director of The Thin Blue Line and The Fog of War couldn't get a film into theaters.

In February 2019, Morris tweeted, "Fuck 'em. I will distribute the movie myself." By the end of the year, American Dharma made it to the multiplex.

In November, Reason's Nick Gillespie sat down with the 71-year-old filmmaker for a conversation about the censorious early reactions to his new film, why he thinks we're in a golden age of documentary filmmaking, and what he learned—and didn't learn—about Steve Bannon's philosophy.

Reason: Let's start with the title, American Dharma. Steve Bannon comes back to the idea of "dharma" as central to his worldview. What is it and why is it so important to him?

Morris: It's hard for me to talk about Bannon's philosophy, because Bannon's philosophy is a hodgepodge of Catholicism, Hindu philosophy, pop psychology. It's almost like a vomit pad of various unsorted and undifferentiated ideas. I'd made a career of chronicling various kinds of self-deception, of people who imagine themselves one way, but in fact they are wrong.

Here, I have a guy who sees himself in Napoleonic terms. He imagines himself as this world-historical individual who's changing the political landscape and ushering in a new age for the working class under the banner of Trumpism. But underneath all of it is nonsense talk. The populist who goes to Harvard Business School, works for Goldman Sachs, takes money from billionaires, starts [arguing against] pluralism. What is this? To me, as often as not, it comes very close to—what's the technical term?—bullshit.

At a certain point in the movie, Steve Bannon lays out three big things that he says are Bannonism: stopping mass illegal immigration, bringing manufacturing jobs back from Asia, and ending pointless foreign wars. Is that his program, or is Bannonism that plus a million other things?

I suppose you could say that's his program. Does the program really make any sense? Say you want to protect manufacturing jobs for the American working class. Do I think that's a bad thing? No. I think that's a good thing. But do I think that the right way to do it is to build a wall? No. I think that's cretinous. I think that it's intellectually dishonest. I don't think it helps anybody or anything. It's violent. It's mean-spirited. It's angry. It's looking for scapegoats to blame.

At one point, Bannon says something like, "We all know what the problems are. It's just a matter of: Do you have the guts to do what it takes to fix them?" You're essentially saying that he's tapped into a real problem—this idea that the middle class isn't getting a fair shake, that the system is rigged, that large forces are screwing people over. But you disagree about what caused that problem and how to fix it.

Here's how I'm susceptible to these arguments, and I quite honestly am susceptible. I grew up in the '50s. My father died when I was 2 years old. My mother was extremely well-educated, a graduate of Juilliard, getting a doctorate in French literature at Columbia. She had to teach elementary school in order to support a family, which she did. Could you do that today? Could she do it today? The answer is probably not.

Is there greater income inequality now as opposed to then?

Yes.

But are standards of living lower?

Not for me. But for the masses, I don't know. For someone who was in my mother's situation, living today vs. living then, her standard of living would have been much lower. Am I wrong?

Yeah, actually. What is the typical American experience now? Do people have opportunity? Do people have material goods? Do they have access to education?

Can they buy a big-screen TV?

I grew up in the '70s, and it was a big deal when we finally could afford a color TV.

Let me ask you: Why are people so angry? Have they always been this angry? Is this something different than what we've seen before? The '60s were not a complacent period. But the '50s—we'd come out of the war, and we had been victorious.

But they weren't really complacent. I mean, you had the civil rights movement starting up.

Well, the '60s turned into one of the nightmare decades. The beginnings of Vietnam. Assassinations galore. I wonder why am I so upset—and I really am upset—by politics [today, in comparison to that].

This is part of what Bannon is talking about, right? And Trump? I mean, they thrive on anger.

They do.

The documentary weaves in Bannon's love of movies, mostly American movies. What is he pulling out of movies like Twelve O'Clock High or Paths of Glory? Does that exemplify a particularly American oddness where you start to live your life refracted through movies that you may or may not be misinterpreting completely?

Oh, movies are so much part of our lives. I found out Bannon's favorite movie was Twelve O'Clock High. It's Gregory Peck's finest performance without any doubt in my mind—better than To Kill a Mockingbird.

Who does Gregory Peck play? General Savage. It's a great name. It's a name you would see in Dickens. General Savage, who is commanding this group of aviators charged with bombing the shit out of Nazi Germany, and at the same time risking their lives—even more than risking their lives. Going up over Europe with the prospect of almost certain death. And General Savage says to his troops, "Consider yourself already dead."

[To understand] Bannon, it helps us to understand this. You will do your duty. You will follow through to your destiny—your dharma. You will stop thinking about yourselves. You will think about nothing other than victory. It may be one of the darkest and most nihilistic movies ever made.

There was a New Yorker review. The headline was "Errol Morris Lets Steve Bannon Off the Hook." Then there came a moment where Bannon himself was canceled. He was going to speak at the New Yorker festival with David Remnick, and it was stopped. After that, your movie didn't get the distribution that it would have otherwise gotten. What's it feel like when you produce something and it's an interesting, in-depth discussion with a person who was in a position of power, and you're revealing his inner workings, and then somebody accuses you of "giving him a platform."

What do you do if you were me? You think about killing yourself. I didn't do it. Call me a coward.

You're no Steve Bannon.

You feel, if you're me: "Should I have made this film?" I'm susceptible to criticism. If people tell me I'm no damn good, I'm certainly willing to entertain that possibility.

But the experience was so damn weird. People became so angry with me and with the movie. They certainly wanted to deplatform not just Bannon; they wanted to deplatform me and American Dharma. I would read reviews saying that this movie was toxic. That was a word that would appear again and again. That it was poisonous, that it should never have been made, that it shouldn't receive distribution.

In one review, someone said that it had discredited everything I had ever done. It had lifted the curtain on my lack of moral fiber. Does one enjoy reading that kind of thing? Not so much.

Do you worry that reflects a broader sentiment? People on the progressive side of things were saying you shouldn't be talking to somebody like Bannon, because to do so is to somehow betray what is right—we shouldn't be engaging in conversation with people we disagree with. Do you worry that that's a place that we're getting to as a society?

A place we're getting to? We're there.

How do I even explain it? People [were] so deeply freaked out by what happened in 2016 that they just wanted to make believe it never happened. Or if it did happen…we were the victims of a terrible conspiracy.

People want to disassociate themselves from it, from the horror of it. "Mommy, mommy, please make it go away." I don't think I understood how strong that feeling of just out-and-out despair and fear—I still feel it acutely, two plus years after the election.

Do you feel like now—with a little bit of time and the fact that Bannon is now no longer part of the Trump administration—that people can approach the movie without seeing red all the time?

Without going batshit crazy?

Yeah.

Bannon is back in the picture again. He is organizing a radio show podcast to help Trump in this period….He's still here, and he's still doing the same frightening, disruptive, malicious things that he's been doing all along.

In the movie, there's a sense that he's a bullshit artist. Was he responsible for Trump's victory, do you think? Or is he a very good salesman, and he knows how to take credit for a sale that was going to take place anyway?

I don't think it was a sale that was going to take place anyway. I don't like his politics. I don't like his crackpot ideologies. But I do buy into his belief that he made a big difference in the election.

I wish it weren't so. But he from early on decided to go after Hillary Clinton. [Peter Schweizer's] book Clinton Cash—it's not well known, but Schweizer was writing previously about Hunter Biden and Joe Biden in the Ukraine.

This is all a playbook….I don't want to suggest some kind of arcane conspiracy, but these people were successful. I mean, if the aim was to bring Hillary Clinton down by hook or by crook—

Does it matter if it's by hook or by crook? Hillary Clinton, the Bidens, and Trump—they reveal how power operates at a very high level. And to many people, when that's revealed, they say, "There's something wrong here." It may not be the worst thing in the world for us to understand how influential people manage to arrange things to their benefit.

Probably not. You feel that someone in the last two or three years has lifted up a rock and you see all of these bugs—Democratic and Republican bugs—crawling around underneath the rock. It makes me wonder whether this whole idea that I've had of America is just a delusion.

And that's in America, which is certainly not without dark corners, but it's a happier place than many others.

I used to talk about fig leaf equality—that no one really believes in equality, but they do believe in paying lip service to equality. It's the appearance of equality, tilting towards rather than against equality. Nowadays I feel that everything that to me made America America—not because there was perfect equality, perfect freedom, perfect fairness, perfect justice—but somehow those as ideals have been utterly abandoned and replaced with a kind of cynicism. And even beyond cynicism, a kind of nihilism.

I am really interested in talking about this in connection to what I think is one of your great achievements: the series that appeared on Netflix, Wormwood, about the ways in which the Defense Department and the CIA were dosing people with LSD, or experimenting on their own people in different ways. You've pulled back the pleasant paint job and revealed a real American Gothic underneath. You're showing how things actually operate. Can you do that and not inspire, at least for a period of time, cynicism?

I don't know.

You need the Church Commission hearings, the Rockefeller Commission hearings, so people will understand all of the awfulness that the American government was doing. But then, how do you reset the playing field so that we don't go right back into that?

Maybe you don't.

When I was growing up in the '50s—this was the time of the Warren Court, and I kind of love the Warren Court. I remember very well reading Anthony Lewis' Gideon's Trumpet, about the Supreme Court decision that said everyone is entitled to representation by a lawyer in a court of law. I remember thinking to myself, "What happens if all of these liberal Supreme Court justices are replaced by anti-liberal Supreme court justices? Then what?" I couldn't quite imagine it. I can imagine it now.

You know, I'm on the left. No fooling. My only trouble with the left is the left usually isn't left enough for me. I'm a filmmaker, so I try to make a film about it. I try to think about it in my own small way. Why is there this attack on immigration? Why is there an attack on the possibility of a more global economy? Why is this all going on?

American history is a series of anti-immigrant hysterias going back to the 1800s. If you look at the Democratic National Convention in the 1990s, Bill Clinton gave a long speech about how they were going to finally crack down on illegal immigration. Somehow, dislocations in the American economy were the fault of people sneaking across the Southern border to cut your grass or clean your pools for relatively cheap. We're back to something like that.

This is where I want to complicate things for you, being on the left. When Bernie Sanders says that free trade is problematic—free trade is globalization. That's why Chinese people and African people have higher standards of living than they did years ago. Is the backlash broader than a right-wing reaction?

It seems to be broader. I always tell people that the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel is misinterpreted. The scene where God is supposedly breathing life into Adam—I see it slightly differently. It's God teaching the value of finger-pointing, patiently explaining to Adam, "You see, things are going to be very difficult out there. You really have to learn to blame other people for things that you yourself are responsible for or you're never going to make any headway in this world."

Bannon said something to me, you know: "Do you want foreigners all over this country?" Yeah! I'm a foreigner. I'm a Jew. My parents came here from Eastern Europe. I go to London now quite often because I'm involved in directing a project in London. Who knows what's going to happen because of Brexit, but one of the things I like about London is that I see a lot of people from all around the world. They're Muslims, they're Christians, they're Jews, they're whatever. And to me, that makes the world a better place to live. My innate xenophobia hasn't really developed yet, I guess.

Do you think that that kind of xenophobia stems from a lack of confidence? You talk about growing up in the '50s. That's the thick of the American century. And even though the Cold War was going on, America was winning. America was great. This is what Donald Trump is referring back to, right? Is a lack of confidence in America's greatness leading to people saying we have to shut things down? We have to shut the borders down? We've got to shut the global economy down?

The realization that America does not have total unchallenged power in the world.

Brexit in Britain is certainly about that as well. There's a hotel in Toronto that occasionally I stay at when I go to the Toronto Film Festival, and it's this enormous hotel with literally thousands upon thousands of rooms. Someone at the hotel told me that 100 years ago, this was the biggest hotel in the British empire. And I said, "Well, now this hotel is bigger than the British empire." More or less, it's true. They don't have the empire anymore. Things change. We don't control the world the way we may have controlled the world in the immediate post-war period.

It's kind of a relief, isn't it, that we don't have to be responsible for everything?

You don't have to be responsible for everything. But are we going to be afraid of everything? Is everything just [going to be] run on fear?

There's this line that Bannon would use again and again and again: getting our sovereignty back. Well, maybe I'm a different kind of human being. I don't know even what would it mean for me to get my sovereignty back. Does that mean that I sit on my front lawn with a shotgun and say, "You kids get off my lawn!"? Would that be getting my sovereignty back? Throwing [Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals] immigrants out of my country—is that getting my sovereignty back? It's not something I think about. I don't get up in the morning and say, "Who took my sovereignty?"

I want to talk about film in general and the distribution of film, and the possibilities that you've seen emerge over the course of your career. There's so much going on outside of the traditional studios these days, whether it's Amazon or Netflix. Do you feel like you've benefited from the end of the traditional production and distribution system?

Yes.

Can you talk a little bit about that? And is it good not just for you, but does it bring more voices and more possibilities into film and creative expression?

Things as a filmmaker are better now for me than they have ever been. Not that this stops me from complaining, but I have less to complain about. People are paying for me to work. My films—maybe with difficulty—are all getting distribution. I should be a happy camper.

More opportunities? Absolutely. Documentary film, [not long ago] no one would watch it. Now there's just endless documentary film production. Cameras have gotten lighter. Budgets have gotten higher. I thought maybe the Bannon film would [be the end of] me. It has not. I'm still making stuff. I'm still working.

But I have this feeling, and I think it's shared by a lot of people, that we just don't really understand which way the world is going and why. There's something mysterious out there. The internet has had such far-reaching consequences on everything from streaming video to the dissemination of information. No one really understands what's going on. We know that stuff is changing rapidly, but not exactly how and what to do about it.

You started out by talking about people who responded negatively to American Dharma and your engagement with Steve Bannon, where they just didn't want to deal with something horrible that had happened.

They want it to go away.

And one way to do that is to pretend that it never happened.

That is one way to do it, yes.

What do you hope for, now that the movie is getting the release that it arguably deserved a year ago? What is the thing that you want audiences to take away from it, more than anything else?

I want people to see the movie and to think about the issues that are expressed, to think about what's happening in this country—perhaps why it's happening—and to think really seriously about what to do about it.

What to do about it is not avoiding it. What to do about it is not pretending that nothing is happening, or that it was an accident, or that it was some implacable conspiracy imposed on us by the Russians or whoever.

I think we need to actually confront what's going on in this country and try to work as hard as we possibly can to change things. And for me, quite simply, another four years of Trump I think would put a final nail in the American coffin. It's not something that I look forward to.

This interview has been condensed and edited for style and clarity. For a video version, visit reason.com. For a podcast version, subscribe to The Reason Interview With Nick Gillespie.

NEXT: Wyoming May Improve on Its Great Food Freedom Law

Editor's Note: We invite comments and request that they be civil and on-topic. We do not moderate or assume any responsibility for comments, which are owned by the readers who post them. Comments do not represent the views of Reason.com or Reason Foundation. We reserve the right to delete any comment for any reason at any time. Report abuses.

  1. The only fitting response to Errol Morris: Ok, Boomer.

    1. It’s ironic that the Boomers like Morris who, by and large, made Peter Pan syndrome a way of life and “SCREW YOU, DAD!” a motto, are being kicked to the curb by today’s youth.

      1. It’s especially fitting that leftists like this moron are getting deplatformed and canceled and kicked to the curb by the leftists he helped create.

      2. Lefties will reap what they sow.

        Many Boomers tried to to destroy the family unit after being Useful Idiots to Commie Propaganda and now they wont have any family to care for them as they are now old.

        1. TBH, guys like Morris frighten me more than the Bannons; because not only do they ignore the fascist authoritarianism in their motives and beliefs, but they think it’s justified by their “cause”. Their passion for ideological purges and speech policing comes from a deep held belief in their own personal righteousness.

          As Lewis said “those who torment us for our own good, will torment us without end for they do so with the approval of their own conscience.”

      3. You know, I don’t mind people on this site quoting or paraphrasing me, but the least you could do is give a hat tip or something.

        Red Rocks White Privilege
        February.12.2020 at 10:25 am
        It’s ironic that a generation which, by and large, made Peter Pan syndrome a way of life and “FUCK YOU, DAD!” a motto, is going to end up being kicked to the curb by today’s youth.

    2. Nick must have masturbated furiously while conducting this interview.

      1. Hope he didn’t get any on his leather jacket. That’s tough to clean… apparently.

        1. lol exactly what i thought

    3. What was especially cringe-worthy about this documentary is that it was trying to meme Bannon as Trump’s “man behind the curtain” the way Cheney was portrayed for Dubya. When Trump fired him, they had no one left to scapegoat their rage at Trump on to.

      These people are literally stuck in a time-warp where it’s always 2004, and they think they’re still on the cutting edge of political commentary and satire. It’s why every talk show is aping the Stewart era of The Daily Show, but nothing they’re selling is taking hold despite their MSM partners faithfully replaying their clips on the morning talk shows and social media. They don’t realize that they’re The Establishment now, and the people rebelling against them are the counter-culture.

      1. Whenever I hear guys like this talk this way, it reminds me of when I used to go to a party during my university days and the house had wall carpeting giving a stale atmosphere.

        That’s the modern pop progressive left intellectually as far as I’m concerned.

        They lost the plot and they don’t even know it.

        The other day someone pointed to me to Samantha Bee and her lunatic ranting against Prager U. It was faux-intellectual buffoonery at its finest.

        That’s where they’re at. What are they protecting? Why do they go straight for the personal attacks? If they’re intellectual framework is so sophisticated and superior, why do they keep ‘going lower when they go low?’

    4. Exactly. He literally just dismisses everything out of hand as “well I don’t agree that your ideas will do what you say you want, so you’re a bullshit artist!”

      I really hope we implement the Hyde solution to the Boomer problem.

  2. Say you want to protect manufacturing jobs for the American working class. Do I think that’s a bad thing? No. I think that’s a good thing. But do I think that the right way to do it is to build a wall? No. I think that’s cretinous.

    That’s where I stopped reading. I really don’t know much about Bannon one way or the other, but suggesting that the wall was in response to manufacturing jobs leaving is dishonest. The wall was about illegal immigration.

    1. There’s a clear and simple relationship here going on, actually. USA puts people on welfare at ??? $10 and hour (when you add bennies), for doing nothing. Then, in some cities, min wage is $15 an hour, plus all sorts of mandated bennies, so employers have NO incentive to hire you, unless you are ALREADY quite productive! There’s NO “bottom of the job ladder” available to you!

      So realistically, low-labor-wage-rate jobs (meatpacking)? Either bring the illegal sub-humans here to get the job done… Few native-born workers will do it; welfare pays almost as well, and the welfare “job” is MUCH easier… Or SHIP THAT JOB to Mexico or elsewhere! And the WALLS are a half-assed, easily bypassed, non-solution to try and keep those jobs here (albeit with illegal sub-human workers).

      The walls are non-fixes that PRETEND to fix the problems! They are just red meat for troglodytes!

      1. SQRlsy, I looked at your time stamp. you either stealing time from your employer or your unemployed.

        let us know which.

    2. “Is there greater income inequality now as opposed to then?
      Yes.”

      And that’s where I stopped.

      1. And so what if there is? Is society better off if a poor person makes $5,000 a year and a rich person makes $100,000 compared to a society where a poor person makes $20,000 a year and a rich person makes $1,000,000?

        Like Margaret Thatcher pointed out: they would prefer for the poor to be poorer, as long as it meant the rich were less rich.

        1. “Like Margaret Thatcher pointed out: they would prefer for the poor to be poorer, as long as it meant the rich were less rich.”

          Yes, this! WAAAAY too many people think, “the more punishment, the more justice”!

          Wealth inequality is unjust; therefor, the rich must be PUNISHED!!! Never mind that ALL must collectively be punished, in order to accomplish this!

        2. “Is society better off if a poor person makes $5,000 a year and a rich person makes $100,000 compared to a society where a poor person makes $20,000 a year and a rich person makes $1,000,000?”

          Numbers in a vacuum don’t really mean anything, what matters is the cost of living.
          If housing becomes largely unaffordable for a majority of people, that’s a problem.
          The inequality would be an issue if prices are inflated disproportionately by high earners.
          Though I don’t think “inequality” is the/a major driver of general price inflation, but the credit based economy certainly is…

          1. Absolutely correct…….

            https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=pu4BjivBHVo

            The cost of living is the key.

      2. And this:

        But are standards of living lower?

        Not for me. But for the masses, I don’t know. For someone who was in my mother’s situation, living today vs. living then, her standard of living would have been much lower. Am I wrong?

        Morris is either an idiot or a liar (or both).

      3. The issue with this question, is that it assumes everywhere in America is the same. Is the quality of life of the poor better or worse in Los Angeles than it was 20 years ago. Is the answer the same in New York? How about DFW?

        I can see how someone who has to commute two hours and has to have three roommates for a blue collar or service industry job in New York might think their parents had it better than them (even if there was a chance they’d get shot in the street).

    3. Aren’t they intertwined? Illegals coming up and taking jobs has been a central theme of the immigration debate.

    4. Too bad you stopped reading and missed this:

      I go to London now quite often because I’m involved in directing a project in London. Who knows what’s going to happen because of Brexit, but one of the things I like about London is that I see a lot of people from all around the world. They’re Muslims, they’re Christians, they’re Jews, they’re whatever. And to me, that makes the world a better place to live. My innate xenophobia hasn’t really developed yet, I guess.

      Yep, I visit London and I like the way it’s a global village so who the hell are these Englishmen called Londoners, just because they live in London and built London and made London what it is, think they are if they think they have the right to keep invaders immigrants out who want to turn the city into Marrakesh? They’re xenophobes! They’re probably racists too. They’re certainly low-brow, parochial, ignorant deplorables who don’t appreciate how much better London is now that I can fly in, do my business, get some good Somali sambusa or Lebanese mansaf or Indonesian rawon and fly out again. It’s like Disneyland over there! I love it, and anybody who disagrees with me is an asshole.

      But I’ll bet you a fat fucking dollar this guy and every single person he knows are NIMBYists who regularly scream like hell when these rich, greedy developers and – even worse – those goddamn nouveau riche hipster douchebags and their gentrification bullshit want to move into their neighborhoods and change the whole character of the place. Why, 10 years ago when I and my wife moved here and bought this dilapidated old house and spent nearly a million dollars restoring it to it’s original condition as the beautiful Victorian summer cottage you see before you now, well, we moved here because this was a charming, quirky, inclusive community and now these people want to move in and change things? How dare they!

      1. “They’re Muslims, they’re Christians, they’re Jews, they’re whatever.”

        Whatever. Because they’re all basically the same but it is just so cute and charming how they pretend to be different by dressing differently and saying different things!

        Liberals view other cultures like toddlers playing dress-up.

        1. As I alluded in a recent post on a different article, liberals, especially women, tend to view LGBTQZA+*†® people the same way.

      2. In his favor, being able to get good Somali sambusa or Lebanese mansaf or etc… is a vast improvement over native British cuisine. I sometimes jokingly wonder if the British Empire wasn’t the accidental result of trying to find palatable food to bring back to the homeland. Indian food has become pervasive not just in London, but in much of the country, including basic Indian curries regularly showing up as tavern food. I know I’m thankful for British immigrants at meal times whenever I’ve been to Britain.

        (Don’t get me wrong, Britain produces some great raw ingredients. But truly native British cuisine is generally on a spectrum from bland to awful).

      3. the London you are looking at now it mostly Russian and Middle Eastern money.

        take a look at Manchester or Birmingham or Liverpool to see an English city without foreign investment.

        although B’ham has some of the best vindaloo in the Empire.
        a real arse-burner they would say.

    5. I stopped when he said standards of living are lower now than when he was a kid in the 50’s. How clueless can one be?

      1. That much professional cluelessness takes years of practice.

  3. I made it through the whole thing, but he nearly turned my stomach when he tried to paint Hillary Clinton as this poor unfortunate honest public servant who got unfairly accused of corruption…and you know, they’re trying to do the same thing to Joe and Hunter Biden!

    As long as the Left can’t honestly look at the failings of the people they choose to represent them, they deserve to keep losing. Hillary Clinton (and many others) deserve to pay a price for the things they’ve done, and until they do all of the Left’s preening about what a threat Donald Trump is to the ‘rule of law’ will be exposed as a hollow joke.

    1. Again, Morris must be either an idiot or a liar–and most likely a naive combination of both.

      1. Morris is a Propagandists for Lefties.

    2. Hillary Clinton is a Leftist?

      1. You’ve hurt me more than you know.

      2. To be fair, I didn’t say she was a Leftist, I said the Left chose her to represent them. She did get the endorsement of the Communist Party-USA, and if the CPUSA isn’t far enough left for you, I don’t know what to tell you.

      3. Hillary Clinton is a Fascist.

      4. Hillary Clinton is a clinical psychopath that craves unlimited power at all costs. Leftist just happens to be an effective delivery system for her.

      5. Hillary Clinton is a Leftist?

        Yes, you fucking ignoramus, she is.

      6. Anyone who fights for team blue at this point is. If you have any ideological similarities with team blue, take it elsewhere. Don’t be a Hindenburg.

  4. ‘ The left is not left enough for me’. That right there ended it for me. And defending Clinton and the Biden’s . what a ass.

  5. “He imagines himself as this world-historical individual who’s changing the political landscape and ushering in a new age for the working class under the banner of Trumpism. But underneath all of it is nonsense talk. The populist who goes to Harvard Business School, works for Goldman Sachs, takes money from billionaires, starts [arguing against] pluralism. What is this? To me, as often as not, it comes very close to—what’s the technical term?—bullshit.”

    I don’t see the substantive difference between someone from our elite liberal universities, who takes money from billionaires and imagines he’s fighting for the white, blue collar, working class, and progressives, on the other hand, who imagine that they’re saving the downtrodden from the ravages of the white, blue collar, middle class when they line up to nominate Bloomberg.

    Both may imagine that the other team’s preferred villains are actually the victims, but that isn’t a substantive difference. That’s a matter of perspective.

    1. Progressives are lining up for Sanders. They aren’t nominating Bloomberg, who was Republican, and remains in thrall to neo liberalism.

      Still, I like the idea of a Bloomberg nomination. When the choice is between a Democrat who is an ex-Republican and a Republican who is an ex-Democrat, the Libertarian party has a great chance to show they are different.

      1. Bloomberg is an Democrat, ex-Republican, ex-Democrat. Or simply put an opportunist.

        1. An opportunist running for office is a great opportunity (pardon the pun) for the Libertarians.

          1. If they’re Libertarian. Bloomberg is mostly the opposite of what Libertarians stand for.

      2. ‘Progressives’ will line up for whoever the hell their Masters tell them to.

        1. If your masters are saying that progressives are following Bloomberg, you might want to find a new master.

          1. Bloomberg is the Democratic parties attempt to ensure Sanders doesn’t win the nomination. They assume they can rig the process against Sanders much like it was rigged in 2016. Then is supporters will have no choice but to vote for Bloomberg, because Trump is worse than Hitler.

            We’ll see if it goes down that way.

            1. “We’ll see if it goes down that way.”

              It didn’t work in 2016, I’m surprised you think it will work today.

      3. Bloomberg is not and has never been a Republican.

        He is a lifelong Democrat who ran as a Republican so that he could win an election in a traditionally Democratic city that was riding a wave of Republican created success whose citizens had just suffered a tragedy and had been brought together by a Republican who was term-limited in the wake of it.

        In short, he’s a Democrat who didn’t let a crisis go to waste.

    2. Well as long as everyone gets equal representation to define who is a victim i’m Ok with that if that’s what people want to concern themselves with. Let me tell you why i’m A victim. I’m a victim because my vote doesn’t count relatively speaking compared to JoeBob Cowfucker from General Beauregard County in Wyoming. That sucks. Why do elitists like that get to get in the way of my wife’s choice to have an abortion for fun or my choice to experiment with the LSD/MDMA/2CB/Psilocybin/5MeO-DIPT cocktail I’ve been wanting to try out. God! What a letdown!

      1. Are you gonna cry about living in a Republic in every thread now?

        1. If I lived where elitists in Wyoming lived I wouldn’t complain.

            1. You aren’t as sick of being ruled by a small minority of rural shitkickers as I am, apparently.

              1. It’s not people in Wyoming’s fault that you’re ignorant.

                1. News flash: the people in Wyoming probably don’t care much about you, and at least some have libertarian tendencies. In contrast, I am sure many people in your oppressed Blue State paradise spend far too much time debating how to fix the deplorables in Wyoming.

              2. Thanks for admitting that you’re dumber than a bunch of hayseeds with GEDs.

              3. “You aren’t as sick of being ruled by a small minority of rural shitkickers as I am, apparently.”

                Contempt for average Americans in the rust belt is why they vote for Trump instead of progressives. I’d be tempted not to tell you, but it doesn’t really matter because haters gotta hate.

                If treating average people with the respect they and their opinions deserve is the cost of winning office, most progressives would rather lose.

                1. Sorry, Ken, i’m Just a little pissed off that I always have to defer to the elites that are able to select who is President and in the Senate more than regular joes like me that live in California. We’re treated like peons, you know. Well, except for those tax breaks Dear Leader gave all us California liberals. I guess that makes up for some of it.

                  1. If I was a lily-white, white-collar liberal with a college degree who wasn’t smart enough to beat a bunch of blue-collar factory workers, farmers, and tradesmen, I suppose I’d be rather resentful about that, too.

                    Maybe try doing your own housework instead of relying on Pedro and Consuela to do it for you, and you’ll have more self-respect.

                  2. “Sorry, Ken, i’m Just a little pissed off that I always have to defer to the elites that are able to select who is President and in the Senate more than regular joes like me that live in California.”

                    That’s the epitome of delusion. It was the elites pissing on the deplorables and the bitter clingers that got Trump elected. But in your mind apparently they don’t deserve to get their win that was fairly won.

                  3. Number of Senators of each party from the 4 largest population states: 4 R’s, 4 D’s. It’s also 10-10 in the Senate between the two major parties if we expand the list to the top 10 population states.

                    People also seem to forget Senators from small population states such as Vermont, Rhode Island, Delaware, and Hawaii when it’s convenient for their argument.

              4. “You aren’t as sick of being ruled by a small minority of rural shitkickers as I am, apparently.”

                I’m tired of covering for dead-beat scumbags.
                Please fuck off and die.

  6. “My mother was extremely well-educated, a graduate of Juilliard, getting a doctorate in French literature at Columbia. She had to teach elementary school in order to support a family, which she did. Could you do that today? Could she do it today? The answer is probably not.”

    There isn’t much demand for people with a doctorate in French literature–not even from an Ivy League school–but elementary school teachers made a median of $58,230 a year in 2018.

    https://www.careerexplorer.com/careers/elementary-school-teacher/salary/

    According to that link, the average teacher’s salary in New York state is $79,760.

    1. But in a “fair” world people could spend their time and other people’s money pursuing any kind of avocation they like, and then society would owe them an above-average income (but not too much above average).

      1. Is there anything more libertarian and capitalist than a filmmaker raising money to produce a film, hiring the people required to create it, finding a way to distribute it over the objections of the people who hate it, promoting it through outlets like Reason, and coming to an agreement with theaters and television distribution channels on how much to charge to see it and how to split the revenue?

        When I see successful film producers express reservations about capitalism, it makes me wonder if we’re talking about the same thing. If libertarian capitalism is in the best interests of anyone more than film producers and film creators, then I don’t know who.

        1. Why would anyone in Hollywood back Bernie Sanders?!

          1. Why would anyone in Hollywood back Castro?!
            Why would anyone in Hollywood back Stalin?!
            It’s radical chic.

            1. Yeah, but that’s going after somebody else’s property.

              If you want the government to regulate content, how much you can charge for movies, where and how they’re distributed, as well as whether the film and broadcast projects are funded, then you should definitely support socialism. After all, socialism really is about government taking over that industry and all those choices being made by bureaucrats and the politicians who answer to them.

              If they want to make those choices for themselves, well, capitalism is all about people in markets making choices for themselves on both the consumer and producer side of that equation.

              I see these youngsters making films on the cheap for the streaming services and the independent circuit, and I see documentary film makers, in particular, having no trouble raising funds from investors for films that never would have been made in the past because the production costs were so high–and watching them complain about capitalism in spite of that . . . it’s like watching them hate on the goose that lays the golden eggs.

              If they think getting a movie funded by AT&T, Comcast, Disney, Sony, and ViacomCBS is hard because their executives are unresponsive, wait until you need both their investments and an act of Congress in order to get your picture funded.

              Socialism won’t tolerate Kickstarter.

              1. Yeah, but they don’t ever think the rules apply to them. They fly their wife 500 miles in a private jet for Valentines day after railing against global warming the previous week. And post pictures of the entire event on Instagram. That’s a “let them eat cake” level of cluelessness.

                https://www.breitbart.com/entertainment/2020/02/15/john-legend-chrissy-teigen-use-private-jet-to-grab-valentines-day-dinner/

          2. Because Hollywood is littered with idiots. Mind you, these are the same folks that rail against the wealthy and promote heavy taxation yet the film in Vancouver to save on taxes.

            1. ” film in Vancouver to save on taxes.”

              the horror…

              I’ve heard these Hollywood types don’t even have the decency to study STEM subjects and instead waste our money on baubles like French literature, not to mention being Jewish and stuff..

              1. The utter cluelessness exhibited by your post is astounding.

                When the people railing about how ‘the rich’ don’t pay enough in taxes while filming elsewhere to avoid higher tax rates don’t grasp that THEY are ‘the rich’ who ‘don’t pay enough in taxes’ they’re complaining about there’s no amount of brain dead sarcasm that can save them.

                1. Morris hasn’t shot any films in Vancouver, despite HH’s assurances. Try smearing someone else. Maybe a Vancouverite.

        2. Perhaps Morris exploited a libertarian free market system, but I have to view this at the very least as rather cynical. And I suspect his motives and ultimate agenda are decidedly not libertarian or free market. (Insert something about capitalists selling rope.)

          1. I suspect they don’t really think of what they’re doing as being entrepreneurial and in a capitalist context.

            Catering to the market is considered bad form, which is why Michael Bay is looked down upon. Why, if audiences hated my film, I’d have made it the same way! In fact, let’s hope general audiences hate my film. We wouldn’t want to kill the buzz on the independent circuit, at least not until we sell it at Sundance.

        3. You can’t be a successful capitalist, look around at how capitalism fails for others, think hmmm, and then advocate for socialism?

          1. Whom has libertarian capitalism failed–and how has it accomplished this?

            You mean overpaid government bureaucrats, whether in Sacramento or Washington DC, who would be able to screw honest working people even harder to fund their outrageous pension plans–despite doing nothing anyone would pay for willingly–if only it weren’t for libertarian capitalism?

            Yeah, libertarian capitalism fails them, as well it should.

            1. Free markets also fail people who just find money (and the quest for money) distasteful. That might be OK if mommy and daddy are rich enough to support their dysfunctional progeny, but for regular economic dropouts, the world is a cruel place–also as it should be.

            2. You sure do have a lot of contempt for average working joes that live in California, Ken. I wonder if they are sick of being talked down to by shitkicker elitists in Buttfuckville and if that is the reason they vote Democratic. Just to show them.

              1. Open wider, clinger, you’re going to continue to get progress shoved down your throat sideways.

        4. Good point on film producers, but even the rank-and-file at mind-bogglingly successful tech companies don’t seem to believe in capitalism these days.

          From Open Secrets, the two top candidates for donations from employees of Alphabet (Google’s parent company) are Warren and Sanders, each right around $300k.

    2. My aunt has a degree in French literature. Her career path went through being a dental assistant through to now managing a golf course. The degree itself is and was worthless. Assuming that such a degree entitles a person to a high paying, do nothing job is elitism. University used to be more about educating a gentleman on numerous topics both of material use and of social and historical understanding. When the degree is in those latter things specifically, then it becomes harder to assert what value this knowledge has for others. It is the already wealthy who have the luxury of learning and studying obscure history and cultural oddities. Anyone who expects to make good money off their education must know and be able to do something of significant value to others.

      1. A friend’s son is smart enough to do well for himself, but got sidetracked and now sells firewood for a living. He was moaning the other day about how he deserves to be paid as much as his father or me, because he works hard for that firewood. I was amazed — he invented Marx’s labor theory of value all by his lonesome, and thinks the world owes him everything he won’t work for.

        1. I probably have a different view than such people based on my life experience. I dropped out of college because they kept changing degree requirements every semester (though it was taking me a while since I worked multiple jobs.) I have worked in several different industries and started from the bottom to be promoted up into different specialized career paths. I currently work in a trade and hope to mostly stick with it. I also spent some time intentionally unemployed. I had the saved earnings to live off of, but dabbled in creating small businesses and gigs to earn money in ways that interested me. When you do that, you learn what the actual value of things are. I also split, seasoned, and delivered wood at one time. It can be profitable if done right, but people will not be willing to spend much on a fuel that is also looked at as yard waste. For me, that project was about adding in a somewhat profitable workout routine on top of the electronic mods, custom art, and pure labor gigs I did to burn time. If there aren’t sufficient buyers and demand for something then it probably isn’t worth trying to make a living off that thing.
          Back to your point. I would agree that there are a ton of people who make big money doing absolutely nothing of value (for context, I live and work in Northern VA). I am envious of such people, but I’m content making a decent living off of the honest and properly valued fruits of my labor. If what I do is suddenly not valued enough to provide a comfortable living, then I’ll do something else

      2. Academic idealists are still confused about this. The grand college tradition was for educating people who would never have to work–because they had a wealthy family around them.

        Those same idealists seem annoyed with students who want to learn marketable skills. And they keep encouraging students into esoteric fields, without first asking about family wealth.

    3. His idiocy in thinking that his mother deserved better than teaching elementary school because of her advanced degree reminded me of that other idiot who quit his teaching job to get a masters/PhD (I forget which) in puppetry for $150K in student loans, and then moaned about the injustice of the world where he couldn’t find an elementary school teaching job worthy of his new education. Aside from the sheer lunacy of getting any degree in puppetry, and the advanced lunacy of paying that much for it — I gotta hand it to the school, they sure reeled in a big one.

      1. If there’s elitism, there, it’s in the assumption that elementary school teachers don’t make enough to live on.

      2. Its another form of delusional entitlement.

  7. I want people to see the movie and to think about the issues that are expressed, to think about what’s happening in this country—perhaps why it’s happening—and to think really seriously about what to do about it.

    And what if people see the movie and think about the issues and decide the guy’s right and they go to work for Trump and MAGA?

    The worst thing about this is that the guy is literally a propagandist, a documentarian skilled in the art of creating persuasive arguments, and he’s accusing people like Bannon of being propagandists whose arguments can only possibly appeal to morons easily brainwashed and led around by the nose because they’re incapable of thinking for themselves. I’m absolutely right and you’re totally wrong and the only possible reason you could believe the sort of shit you claim to believe is because you’re evil or crazy or stupid. And this is why we need the re-education camps and the psychiatric prisons and the bullets to the backs of the heads – because we love you and we care about you and we want you to stop being stupid and crazy and evil.

    1. Yes, the righteous and holy cause of protecting people from themselves.

  8. In regards to the cancel culture left trying to deny this filmmaker a voice, I saw The Fog of War in the theater when it came out, and it seems to me that if that film had come out in the early ’70s, instead of during the Iraq War, the director might have had a similar reaction to that film that he did with this movie about Bannon.

    McNamara all but admitted, in that film, that they would have been tried as war criminals for things like the firebombing of Tokyo and low level bombing he brought to the war, which seemed to be about the mathematics of maximizing civilian casualties among other efficiencies.

    McNamara apologizes (in both senses of the word) for his behavior in The Fog of War, and I doubt anti-war audiences in the early 1970s would have taken that laying down either.

    https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/apology

    Plenty of people have always had a hard time telling the difference between explaining why a terrorist, serial killer, or mass shooter did what they did–and trying to justify it.

    In that light, Bannon may only apologize in the sense that he’s arguing for something other people are criticizing, but McNamara was doing it 30 years after the fact in The Fog of War. At the time it was in the theaters, I saw it as an interesting perspective on Iraq, much like watching a TV show about Vietnam set in Korea during the Korean War. In December of 2003, everybody’s minds were on Iraq–and I saw The Fog of War in that light.

    In other words, the emergence of cancel culture may not be what’s going on here. Maybe the reaction to American Dharma is different because Trump was still in office when the Bannon film was released and whether Trump will be reelected is yet to be decided. If The Fog of War had been released during the Nixon vs. McGovern election of 1972, the reaction to seeing McNamara explain his statistical rationale for maximizing the kill ratio (despite increasing American casualties in absolute terms) almost certainly would have provoked a stronger reaction from people who were opposed to the war–and Nixon.

    Like Gilbert Gottfried’s jokes about 9/11, this film may have simply been released too soon. When audiences can see it after Trump is no longer in office, then maybe they can see it with an open mind.

    1. Saw that movie and he really seemed contrite.

  9. Who is Errol Morris, and why should I care about his TDS?

    1. Just the greatest documentarian in the last 50 years or so… I mean, besides Dinesh D’Souza, of course.

      1. Now see, I would have pegged you for a Michael Moore fan.

      2. “Just the greatest documentarian in the last 50 years or so…”

        So no one worth caring about.
        Fuck off, scumbag.

    2. “why should I care about his TDS?”

      Because you care about everyone’s TDS, even mine.

      1. Making fun of imbeciles is not the same as caring about them; I don’t care about you; you’re a pathetic narcissist due all the derision you get.

        1. “Making fun of imbeciles is not the same as caring about them”

          Sure, I believe you.

  10. “But are we going to be afraid of everything? Is everything just [going to be] run on fear?“

    “And for me, quite simply, another four years of Trump I think would put a final nail in the American coffin. It’s not something that I look forward to.”

    Uh, ok.

    1. The appropriate question at that point would have been, “what do you mean by ‘American’?”

      1. Well, he admitted that the left isn’t left enough so I think we can draw our own conclusions.

        But more importantly, to me anyway, it shows the blatant hypocrisy and lack of self awareness that has become so common in “elites”.

    2. Yeh, let’s disregard the good policies he put in place.

      Hyperbolic bull shit without any substance at it finest.

  11. But after early reviewers accused the Oscar-winning director of going too easy on the onetime head of the alt-light website Breitbart, Morris—a self-described liberal who says he was shocked to discover people thought he was promoting rather than exposing Bannon’s views—found it impossible to get a distribution deal in the United States. It was the first time in decades that the acclaimed director of The Thin Blue Line and The Fog of War couldn’t get a film into theaters.

    Perhaps this is not because of his treatment of Bannon, but because (a) political documentaries have a very limited audience and (b) the distribution of films in theatres is in steep decline, due mainly to on-line outlets like Netflix and Amazon Video. It sounds like the guy is keyed into an economic system from 40 years ago.

    (Personally, I have not gone to a theatre to see a movie in over 10 years, and in the last year, our family only went once, when my wife took my two daughters to a matinee. I just wait till it comes out on Netflix or Amazon, and at most pay a few dollars to see it there.)

    1. ” It sounds like the guy is keyed into an economic system from 40 years ago. ”

      Film on a large screen will always look better than video on a TV or computer monitor. Film makers will always want to show their work in the best possible light. Martin Scorsese also tells us how he treasures the experience of viewing a film with a large audience. He likens it to a spiritual event like a church service.

      1. “Always”

        For all values of always that are less than however long it takes for perfection of VR experiences for just a few bucks. Then the home experience will be superior.

        We are already close – with 70 inch 4k televisions being in the $500 range already. What would it take? 100 inch 8k tv? That’s superior resolution to the theater. Bigger sound system? You can already get sophisticated sound systems that shake the building for relatively cheap.

        There is no doubt that the communal experience is different than the home experience. But the film is definitely not “always” going to look better in the theater. It is already close…. that’s why theaters now have recliners and seat heaters and food service… One theater here even has beds. Actual beds that you lie down in to watch the movie. Which sounds suspiciously like they are trying to make the theater experience more like the home experience.

        1. “One theater here even has beds. Actual beds that you lie down in to watch the movie.”

          In parts of Asia I’ve seen video rooms which give young couples a chance to spend some private time together in comfort while watching a video they choose. Rather like the role drive ins (passion pits) used to play.

          I take your point about advancing technology, but I still think most film makers today still aspire to having their work appreciated on the big screen with an audience. Perhaps this is clinging to a business model 40 years out of date, but so are moon missions, legacy of an age of grander visions.

      2. Its a political documentary which means it really doesn’t need any of the supposed viewing advantages a theater might have.
        Anyone really want to go spend $12 for a ticket + $6 for popcorn to watch that sort of thing in a theater?

        Film on a large screen will always look better than video on a TV or computer monitor.
        Computer monitors and the typical small format TV I will give you but, home theater done right is as good as the theater.
        These days ‘done right’ doesn’t need to break the bank.

  12. A public elementary school teacher definitely enjoys a higher standard of living today than in the 1950s. On the other hand, a woman with a doctorate in French literature would have had an easier time finding a good job in the 1950s-1970s than she would now. Today, competition for good positions in academia is intense, and many courses are taught by part-time adjuncts.

  13. I was reading a piece the other day proving that Trump is literally Hitler by comparing the things Hitler said and the things Trump says.

    Jews are evil. Jews are parasites and blood-suckers. Jews are undermining our country and our culture and our values. Jews control the lying media who try to present Jews as good, decent people. We need to build camps to lock up the Jews, or better, just get rid of Jews altogether. We should hate the Jews and see them as “the other” and the enemy of all we hold dear. We need to remake this country in the image of good, patriotic, decent folks instead of what those evil ungodly Jews have turned it into.

    Now imagine instead of Jews, we’re talking about immigrants and Fake News and anybody who dares criticize Dear Leader and MAGA and you can plainly see Trump sounds just like Hitler.

    And all I could think is, imagine instead of Jews we’re talking about billionaires and capitalism and Republicans and fundamental transformations. You know who else sounds just like Hitler? Which one is actually more likely to build the gas chambers?

    1. “Which one is actually more likely to build the gas chambers?”

      You don’t need more than one gas chamber to tax a billionaire.

      Also, I think you underestimate Hitler’s ability as a politician. He had a surprisingly astute reading of the politicians of the time and was able to wrap them around his finger. Comparing him to Trump is ridiculous. Hitler would have died sooner than send fawning love notes to leaders like Chairman Kim.

    2. Why ‘imagine instead of Jews’? Today they say ‘Zionists’ or ‘Israelis’, but they still mean Jews.

      From the River to the Sea, amirite?

  14. Say you want to protect manufacturing jobs for the American working class. Do I think that’s a bad thing? No. I think that’s a good thing.

    Manufacturing jobs are not more special than other jobs. Manufacturing jobs have been decreasing since 1943 while manufacturing output has been increasing.

    She had to teach elementary school in order to support a family, which she did. Could you do that today? Could she do it today? The answer is probably not.

    The horror of having to work for a living! And teachers make more to do, and I bet there are a lot of single parent teachers.

    Is there greater income inequality now as opposed to then?
    Yes.

    No there isn’t, and it’s about as meaningful a measure as trade deficits.

    But are standards of living lower?
    Not for me. But for the masses, I don’t know. For someone who was in my mother’s situation, living today vs. living then, her standard of living would have been much lower. Am I wrong?
    Yeah, actually. What is the typical American experience now? Do people have opportunity? Do people have material goods? Do they have access to education?
    Can they buy a big-screen TV?
    I grew up in the ’70s, and it was a big deal when we finally could afford a color TV.

    Good for Nick for calling him out. This guy is utterly ignorant of life for the masses.

    Going up over Europe with the prospect of almost certain death.

    “Almost certain death” my ass. He is utterly ignorant.

    They certainly wanted to deplatform not just Bannon; they wanted to deplatform me and American Dharma.

    Welcome to your own fucking world, you statist cretin. Welcome to the world you wish upon the half of America that doesn’t like you.

    You know, I’m on the left. No fooling. My only trouble with the left is the left usually isn’t left enough for me

    How about now, statist cretin? Is it statist enough for you? How do you like them apples, statist cretin, now that the left has decided that you aren’t left enough?

    You don’t have to be responsible for everything. But are we going to be afraid of everything? Is everything just [going to be] run on fear?

    That’s the world you wanted and the world you’ve been pushing for. How do you like them apples, statist cretin?

    We know that stuff is changing rapidly, but not exactly how and what to do about it.

    How about NOT thinking you have to do anything about it? How about thinking that the world is not yours, and you are not responsible for directing it?

  15. “That’s the world you wanted and the world you’ve been pushing for. How do you like them apples, statist cretin?”

    What makes you think he doesn’t love them apples? We’re all here providing free publicity for a film he recently finished and wants to distribute. What’s not to love about apples such as them?

    1. What makes you think he doesn’t love them apples?

      The entire documentary, and this entire interview, are all about him not liking them apples.

      1. Take his complaints with a grain of salt. A film maker, making films he chooses to make with total artistic control, while making money, and us providing him with free publicity: these are the apples he loves.

        1. “Take his complaints with a grain of salt. A film maker, making films he chooses to make with total artistic control, while making money, and us providing him with free publicity: these are the apples he loves.”

          So one of our resident bullshitters is here to tell us the entire article is NWS after explaining (above) that I should be interested in his TDS?
          Sitting on that fence must be painful to your ass.

          1. There is only one thing in the world worse than being talked about, and that is not being talked about. Time to talk about me now! Forget about Errol whatshisname.

  16. San Francisco’s Willie Brown, to the people of Iowa and New Hampshire, “You don’t matter.” I’m surprised he didn’t call them “deplorable”:

    https://www.sfchronicle.com/bayarea/williesworld/article/Is-Joe-Biden-toast-States-that-matter-are-about-15057975.php

    The sad part is that we all know darn well that the fake libertarian scum of Reason agree with him.

    1. America is a compact of the States not a federal dictatorship run by mobs….thank god for the Senate..or we would not have a union…idiot statists

    2. Regarding Bloomie, from the link:
      “…He’s also raking in the endorsements, especially from mayors. There’s a reason for that — Bloomberg is the only candidate who will invite you to a fundraiser and give you money rather than ask for it…”

      This is Willie writing; he knows how to buy votes! Ask him about his ‘friendship’ with Jim Jones. I’ve asked a couple of times; he always has something to take care of across the room, even if he’s in the midst of the meal at a restaurant!
      And ask Kamala about studying politics under Willie…

  17. alt-light website Breitbart

    Wait till the Kancel Kulture Klan reads that!

  18. I suppose you could say that’s his program. Does the program really make any sense? Say you want to protect manufacturing jobs for the American working class. Do I think that’s a bad thing? No. I think that’s a good thing. But do I think that the right way to do it is to build a wall? No. I think that’s cretinous. I think that it’s intellectually dishonest. I don’t think it helps anybody or anything. It’s violent. It’s mean-spirited. It’s angry. It’s looking for scapegoats to blame.

    And this quote demonstrates why you should not give this man’s opinion any weight whatsoever. Every syllable of that is idiotic and even self-contradictory.

    Let’s start with his fetish for the wall: Take as a given that one wants to stop illegal immigration in huge numbers. What must one do? It is pretty simple. There are only a couple of possible actions.

    1. Stop the attraction that makes them want to be here.
    2. Make a barrier that prevents them from being able to come here.

    That’s pretty much it.

    We tried 1. It is the reason you have to hand over all those documents every time you apply for a job. And it stops people who are not able to obtain fake identities from getting jobs as engineers at big companies. And accountants, lawyers, dentists…. But not manual laborers. Hmm… I wonder why people are wanting to maintain the status quo?

    And for 2? Well, you have guards at the border already. And you have fences already. And walls. And they sorta work. But not if you are really determined.

    So why is more of the same on #2 violent? What possible mental gymnastics are you doing to say “even more fence” is mean? Or angry?

    And what is the result of not taking the mean, violent, angry way? Well, the result is to have tens of millions of people in the United States who are not legally allowed to work. So what are they going to do?

    Well, not starve to death, that’s for sure. So they find a job. A job where not being able to produce legitimate proof of citizenship doesn’t matter. A job as a day laborer. A job picking vegetables. Or cleaning someone’s house. Or hanging drywall. Jobs that trap people into low wages, because they cannot choose another profession after they have proven their value. Jobs without benefits, or protection from US labor laws.

    So who exactly is being “intellectually dishonest”? This one isn’t close. Fighting against border enforcement is the intellectually dishonest position. That stance is a stance in favor of exploiting vulnerable people – and keeping them down for as long as they live here. That stand is indefensible and immoral.

    There is a perfectly rational and moral argument to be made for greatly increasing the amount of legal immigration. But that isn’t the argument any of these people are making. They want more illegal immigration. That makes them the immoral ones.

    With more legal immigration through increasing quotas or increasing numbers of H-1b visas or whatever method, having a physical barrier to aid in border enforcement doesn’t hurt anything. And with decreasing or even zeroed out quotas, it still doesn’t hurt anything because it prevents all this exploitation. In fact, what actually blocking illegal immigration would do is to very rapidly lead to an increase in legal immigration.

    There are tens of millions of jobs filled by illegal immigrants. Those jobs need doing. If you cut off all of those illegal workers, the people who need the work done will have to find someone to do it. And they will howl and scream to get the law changed so they can have immigrant workers if there are no native workers to do the job.

    This is a no brainer. The intellectually dishonest people are the ones critical of the wall. There is no rational argument against adding to the wall, other than “priorities for spending”. It is not hateful. It is a wall. It can’t hate. Even if Adolf Hitler himself rose from the grave to endorse the wall, it would still just be a wall.

    1. I hope, our desperate need for a wall on the southern border is not forthcoming.

      Here in the US, we had eliminated measles, polio, and TB. Our legal immigration system prevented importation of those deseases. ALL of them are back in the US and tracable directly to illegal immigration.

      The good news to some extent is that vacinations work against measles and polio. The bad news is the imported strain of TB is resistant to meds and enough different that the vacination is ineffective.

      If, as I expect, the coronavirus currently spreading reached and rins amuck in Latin America and Mexico, it will pour across that unprptected border in a river of death.

      If that happens, I hope all of you who opposed immigration controls, including “The Wall”, are the first to be infected, and among the deaths you enabled.

    2. “Take as a given that one wants to stop illegal immigration in huge numbers. ”

      That’s a mistake. Many people, myself and apparently Morris, don’t give a shit about illegal immigration, and view the whole thing as a sop to the rubes. Not dissimilar to Nazis blaming Jews for the problems of the world. To assume that everyone shares your paranoia of the outsider is misconceived.

    3. We forced them to give up their slaves.

      They’ve been trying to get them back ever since.

  19. “Does the program really make any sense? Say you want to protect manufacturing jobs for the American working class. Do I think that’s a bad thing? No. I think that’s a good thing. But do I think that the right way to do it is to build a wall? No. I think that’s cretinous. I think that it’s intellectually dishonest. I don’t think it helps anybody or anything. It’s violent. It’s mean-spirited. It’s angry. It’s looking for scapegoats to blame.”

    I’m a very literate man.

    This paragraph annoyed me. It’s the same old tiresome and predictable nonsense we’ve come to expect from the left who pet rend to be ‘centrist’.

    The misplaced arrogance and complete dismissal of history is shocking really.

    Also, not sure what the connection between walls and manufacturing is.

    1. I stopped reading here by the way and went back to my Campari.

      1. Maybe you should study your Agripa….

        1. Not following.

          1. Yeah, it was too much of a stretch…

            Campari – capafero – agripa….

            Swordplay banter from Princess Bride.

            Sometimes you get the bear, and sometimes the bear, he gets you. (as long as I’m making staggering and incomprehensible leaps in movie references)

            1. Lol.

              Agrippa was a solid Emperor.

              Like my Campari.

              There’s your link.

      2. I stopped reading after ‘ pet rend.’

  20. Hey Errol.

    Trump is better than that remedial, over rated, over praised, scandalous Obama.

    Way better policies.

    1. +10000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000

  21. A jewish liberal from Russia..and a leftist who is worried Trump will destroy American. Wow..really? Should have asked this guy about his views on foreign policy/interventionism? West Bank Walls? The disparity of wealth due to central banks. Socialism and secularism and the destruction of the nation state..I know the Czar was a bad buy but man…leave the old world behind like Irish, Italians did and adopt our culture and belief in limited govt, peace, and real liberty…where govt allows free association and understands the ability to discriminate in our economic and social life is called freedom.

  22. I made $64,000 so far this year working online and I’m aade such great money. It’s really user friendly and I’m just so happy that I found out full time student. I’m using an online business opportunity I heard about and I’ve mabout it. Here’s what I’ve been doing===►► Click it here  

  23. “And for me, quite simply, another four years of Trump I think would put a final nail in the American coffin.”

    Well if it’s that fragile then it probably wasn’t worth saving. Then again maybe it’s like someone with an irrational rodent phobia who burns down their house because they see a mouse; progressives never really liked the house anyway and they seem like they think burning the whole thing down to get Trump might be worth the tradeoff.

    1. Well, so what if 4 more years of Trump destroys America? The whole world only has 12 years left anyway (AOC told us so). So we can all enjoy 8 years of post-apocalyptic dystopia before the final curtain comes down.

    2. The Dems have been harvesting sour grapes for a while now.

  24. Google paid for every week online work from home 8000 to 10000 dollars.i have received first month $24961 and $35274 in my last month paycheck from Google and i work 3 to 5 hours a day in my spare time easily from home. It’s really user friendly and I’m just so happy that I found out about it..go to this site for more details…

    So I started

    ……………. Read more

  25. I essentially started three weeks past and that i makes $385 benefit $135 to $a hundred and fifty consistently simply by working at the internet from domestic. I made ina long term! “a great deal obliged to you for giving American explicit this remarkable opportunity to earn more money from domestic. This in addition coins has adjusted my lifestyles in such quite a few manners by which, supply you!”. go to this website online domestic media tech tab for extra element thank you ……..BizO26HD.com

  26. I was listening to an interview with this guy the other day. What amused me the most was just how much he agreed with Steve Bannon on everything and how much that scared him and how it was obviously because Bannon had secret bad thoughts that he wouldn’t share that separated him and made him different from Errol. See Errol is right thinking and liberal so any agreements he might have with someone who helped elect Trump could in no way be similar to his enlightened world view, so it’s obvious to him that Bannon arrived at his in a nefarious way. Which was interesting to me because it relied on 0 self reflection or sense of irony. These people are dangerous. And I’m not talking about people like Bannon I’m talking about well heeled people like Morris because even if you have the right perspective and surely Bannon as a populist essentially throwback blue collar democrat does it’s still wrong and proof of your racism. Morris and people like him might not cheer when fellow travelers decide to put their “idealogical” enemies against the wall but they won’t say anything either. At least not until it their turn to go against the wall.

    1. Trump has revealed all of bullshit in politics is is all about class, rice bowls and principals as opposed to any real principles. The system is a joke. Fuck all these people.

      1. And whether he’s doing it intentionally or not is irrelevant. Nearly all of the same people screeching like bitches about shit Trump does didn’t say a damn word when Obama did those things, or protested in the mildest of ways.

  27. Morris is proof positive that aging boomers are completely irrelevant, especially the leftist variety.

  28. You have to work and use the computer and internet, and if you can do that and dedicate some time each day then you can do this with no problem.I have been working with this for a month and have made over $2,000 already.for more see here. open and go home….Check The Details===►► Read more

  29. Single Mom With 4 Kids Lost Her Job But Was Able To Stay On Top By Banking Continuously $1500 Per Week With An Online Work She Found Over The Internet… Check … HERE☛ ……. Read more

  30. You have to work and use the computer and internet, and if you can do that and dedicate some time each day then you can do this with no problem.I have been working with this for a month and have made over $2,000 already.for more see here. open and go home….click here==►► Read more

  31. At English Dharma, known documentarian Errol Morris sits down with known nightmare Steve Bannon for the series of conversations about politics, Trump, and classical cinema Bloggerali . Bannon tells Morris inspired him to create his own films, and Morris says Bannon that he’s perfectly scared of him. It’s an exciting speech, and thing that The A.V. Club spoke with Morris about at the new sit-down in Los Angeles. At this cut above, Morris talks about U.S.’s divisions, hollywood’s resistance to his movie, and why he’s gotten over 1000 commercials

  32. “I think that’s cretinous. I think that it’s intellectually dishonest. I don’t think it helps anybody or anything. It’s violent. It’s mean-spirited. It’s angry. It’s looking for scapegoats to blame.”

    It’s the law. Those who circumvent the laws regarding entry and immigration into the U.S. are invaders and should be treated as such.

    If I refused to show my passport when re-entering the country i would be stopped and arrested. Why does this not apply to people who aren’t even U.S. citizens?

Please to post comments

Comments are closed.