Hurricanes

How 'Price Gouging' Can Help Floridians in Hurricane Dorian's Path

High prices can bring much-needed supplies into a disaster zone.

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Florida is preparing for Hurricane Dorian, which is predicted to be a Category 4 when it makes landfall on Monday

On Wednesday, Republican Gov. Ron DeSantis declared a state of emergency for several counties in the hurricane's path. According to Florida Statute, Section 501.160, it is against the law for a business to sell an essential commodity for an amount that "grossly exceeds the average price at which the same or similar commodity was readily obtainable in the trade area during the 30 days" during a declared state of emergency. 

As of this weekend, Florida Attorney General Ashley Moody has activated the state's "price gouging" hotline. If a business is caught charging significantly elevated prices for goods, it could face a civil fine of $1,000 per violation.

But sky-high prices can be vital information to suppliers and customers who are facing a natural disaster. "Prices are not just money. They are information," John Stossel explained in 2018. "They are what signal entrepreneurs to go into a given business. Rising prices are the clearest indicator of what most customers want."

Jerry Taylor and Peter Van Doren argued something similar in a 2003 commentary piece for the Cato Institute:

Gougers are sending an important signal to market actors that something is scarce and that profits are available to those who produce or sell that something. Gouging thus sets off an economic chain reaction that ultimately remedies the shortages that led to the gouging in the first place. Without such signals, we'd never know how to efficiently invest our resources.

High prices also help prevent a handful of consumers from hoarding the majority of supplies.

"A husband and father who doesn't know how long his town will be without gasoline or drinking water might be inclined to buy as much as he can haul away. If several people do that, supplies run out quickly," A. Barton Hinkle wrote in 2017. "This is the market's extremely efficient way of rationing scarce goods."

"Price gouging—like spinach—may be unappealing at first bite," write Taylor and Van Doren, "but it's good for everyone in the long run."

NEXT: No Matter Who Wins the Fight Over Trump's School Lunch Reforms, Kids Lose.

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  1. TV is showing the panic buying in Florida right now. Isn’t it surprising how many people live in known hurricane (or flood) zones who seem to have no plans for the inevitable? Or people who live in areas where there are regular heat waves who have to depend on free fan giveaways?

    1. You are wrong on both counts. Floridians are generally well prepared, and the buying isn’t panic, it’s part of the prep. The only item that’s really tricky is gas because you have to wait for the new tankers to come in. The empty shelves are also a rarity. They are usually media-staged photos.

      1. Sᴛᴀʀᴛ ᴡᴏʀᴋɪɴɢ ғʀᴏᴍ ʜᴏᴍᴇ! Gʀᴇᴀᴛ ᴊᴏʙ ғᴏʀ sᴛᴜᴅᴇɴᴛs, sᴛᴀʏ-ᴀᴛ-ʜᴏᴍᴇ ᴍᴏᴍs ᴏʀ ᴀɴʏᴏɴᴇ ɴᴇᴇᴅɪɴɢ ᴀɴ ᴇxᴛʀᴀ ɪɴᴄᴏᴍᴇ… Yᴏᴜ ᴏɴʟʏ ɴᴇᴇᴅ ᴀ ᴄᴏᴍᴘᴜᴛᴇʀ ᴀɴᴅ ᴀ ʀᴇʟɪᴀʙʟᴇ ɪɴᴛᴇʀɴᴇᴛ ᴄᴏɴɴᴇᴄᴛɪᴏɴ… Mᴀᴋᴇ $80 ʜᴏᴜʀʟʏ ᴀɴᴅ ᴜᴘ ᴛᴏ $13000 ᴀ ᴍᴏɴᴛʜ ʙʏ ғᴏʟʟᴏᴡɪɴɢ ʟɪɴᴋ ᴀᴛ ᴛʜᴇ ʙᴏᴛᴛᴏᴍ ᴀɴᴅ sɪɢɴɪɴɢ ᴜᴘ… Yᴏᴜ ᴄᴀɴ ʜᴀᴠᴇ ʏᴏᴜʀ ғɪʀsᴛ ᴄʜᴇᴄᴋ ʙʏ ᴛʜᴇ ᴇɴᴅ ᴏғ ᴛʜɪs ᴡᴇᴇᴋ
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  2. High prices also help prevent a handful of consumers from hoarding the majority of supplies.

    I think it’s safe to say that market actors already know what people living under threat of imminent hurricane landfall generally need for supplies, so that part of the anti-gouging policy doesn’t make sense to me here. However, a buttress against hoarding seems the stronger argument in these kinds of cases.

        1. He wrote “hoarding” not…well, you know…

          1. That wasn’t funny. Not even close.

            1. That’s from noted lefty fucking ignoramus EO; it’s not funny, it’s abysmally stupid.

      1. Makes for an entertaining TV show.

    1. Hoarding is what ensures a local supply once the roads are inaccessible after a very bad storm. You sound like a damn central planner.

      1. Not allowing basic laws of economics like supply and demand to increase prices is what ensures that shelves and gas stations will be empty once the roads are inaccessible after a very bad storm. You sound like an economic ignoramus.

        1. You sound like an economic ignoramus.

          Well, it’s a name that’s never posted here before, so…

        2. Uh, what? How does so-called “hoarding” impede the laws of economics?

          What people call hoarding is preparing for shortages, implicitly and sometimes explicitly speculating on future scarcity/increase in prices.

          When people do that, it means there will be local stock when it’s needed. The people that decry it are usually the same ones clamoring for price gouging laws and impeding the market signaling necessary to move goods to where they are needed.

          1. People would have less of an incentive to hoard if the government didn’t prohibit raising prices according to supply and demand.

            1. He’s planning on selling what he hoarded.

          2. “Hoarding” is what the unprepared call “Prepping”.

            1. When you’re prepared for the zombie apocalypse, a few days without power/gas/grocery stores due to a storm is barely a blip.

        3. Look, price gouging can’t possibly be a good thing. Gouging is very bad, mmmmkay? Would you like to get your eyes gouged out, for example? I think not!

      2. “Hoarding is what ensures a local supply once the roads are inaccessible after a very bad storm. You sound like a damn central planner.”

        True, if Home Depot brings 50 extra generators to their local outlet to sell. Not so much if I put them in my garage, taking them off the market.

        1. Why wouldn’t you sell them in the after-hurricane market? You can always buy 50 more generators to keep in your garage later if that’s really what you want. You’re simply trying to ignore the concepts: no sane person “hoards” 50 generators or 500 sheets of plywood unless they planned to sell them later for profit. Food and water that they might consume themselves may be a different story.

          OTOH, with anti-gouging laws in place, locals are tempted to buy as much water, food, gas as they can haul off immediately preceding a storm rather than what they might rationally need. They are doing this in panic and not with forethought to resale This certainly negatively impacts those coming in a few minutes later.

          Also, if someone in say, Kentucky or Arkansas, has the idea to run to their local Home Depot and buy 10, 20 or even 50 generators and load them into a trailer and drive to the hurricane area, they face being arrested for selling the generators for more than cost. So there’s little incentive for anyone do make that effort, even for Home Depot to ship them to stores in the affected areas. So that’s a pile of generators sitting in Kentucky that could have been in Florida absent these laws.

    2. Yes, but what’s the point in rerouting shipments if your profit per bottle isn’t higher?

  3. Once again, we see the willful ignorance of basic economics. Not by the government, but by the sort of writers like Zuri Davis and John Stossel and A. Barton Hinkle. How many times can you bemoan the short-sightedness of politicians who claim to be interested in the good of the people yet take actions directly contrary to the good of the people before you figure out these politicians aren’t stupid – they’re smart enough to know that pandering pays. You’re claiming they’re ignorant of economics when the fact is you’re just ignorant of what it is they’re selling.

    1. See FoE above; you assume too much.

    2. Let’s see if I get this straight.

      Davis, Stossel and Hinkle are ignorant of basic economics because they claim that allowing the law of supply and demand to raise prices will bring goods to market, while politicians who also understand this are the ones in the know because they are selling fairness while knowing that it will result in shortages?

      Contradict yourself much?

      1. Davis, Stossel and Hinkle are ignorant of basic economics because they claim that allowing the law of supply and demand to raise prices will bring goods to market….

        Exactly. Might as well theorize that flying unicorns will bring goods to market as to theorize a market free from political interference. The laws of supply and demand aren’t worth a damn if they don’t take into consideration the supply of politicians and the demand for free lunches. All these guys are saying is that political interference in the market makes the market less efficient, and that’s simply not true. The definition of “efficiency” depends on what it is you’re trying to get out of a system and part of that equation to a politician includes how much virtue-signaling and vote-buying and rent-seeking power he can get out of the deal. Asking a politician to keep his nose out of other people’s business because he’s just making things worse for those other people is silly – you’re not taking into consideration that sticking his nose in other people’s business makes the politician better off and he doesn’t give a shit whether or not it makes the other people worse off.

        1. You’re too subtle. Need to be a bit more obvious. OBL is a good example.

        2. Efficient
          achieving maximum productivity with minimum wasted effort or expense

          Doesn’t seem to fit one virtue signaling politician.

        3. The laws of supply and demand aren’t worth a damn if they don’t take into consideration the supply of politicians and the demand for free lunches.

          Good point. I mean, round wheels aren’t worth a damn if they don’t take square wheels into consideration! Anyone who points out that round wheels are better are wrong because politicians insist that wheels be square! You’re brilliant!

        4. “Exactly. Might as well theorize that flying unicorns will bring goods to market as to theorize a market free from political interference.”

          Which, of course, is totally irrelevant to the issue at hand.

        5. I think you guys are missing Jerry’s point.

          He’s simply saying that to understand what to expect one needs to take into account that politicians will distort the law of supply and demand by their policies that buy votes.

          At least that’s how I read his post.

  4. Be careful what you wish for.

    With today’s technology it should be easy enough to determine every consumers net worth at checkout and modify prices according to what each can “afford”.

    That’ll be $100.00 for your bottle of water, and $1.00 for the person behind you in line.

    Gouging is good eh? How do you like it now?

    1. “With today’s technology it should be easy enough to determine every consumers net worth at checkout and modify prices according to what each can “afford”.”

      On top of being a slimy bigot, you are full of shit.
      No, it is not possible to collect and, in real-time, use that information. If it were, central planning would work.

      1. Not familiar with China, eh.

        1. China doesn’t work, either. You’re not familiar with China, I see.

          1. I am responding to this:
            “No, it is not possible to collect and, in real-time, use that information. ”

            China’s citizen profiling is already doing this to a great extent.

            1. OK, you can use it for ID, but you cannot collect and sort nearly enough to do what Misek claims.

      2. If that’s the only thing that keeps central planning from working, Sevo, we are in real trouble. Think deeper. Central planning doesn’t work because the values of the central planners will never be able to take into account the values of all the participants in the economy. This has nothing to do with information availability.

        1. Chipper Morning Wood
          August.31.2019 at 4:56 pm
          “…Central planning doesn’t work because the values of the central planners will never be able to take into account the values of all the participants in the economy. This has nothing to do with information availability.”

          You’ll note that it took you all of two sentences to contradict yourself; you’re slowing down. Usually one is enough.

          1. Your understanding of praxeology is as muddled as your underwear.

            1. Your sophistry and your contradictions, however, are quite clear.

      3. Amazon has been doing this for two decades.

        They seem to have dialed it back somewhat – you don’t hear these stories any more – but they absolutely tried different price points with different people, trying to find the sweet spot to maximize overall profit.

        1. Cyto
          September.1.2019 at 7:48 am
          “Amazon has been doing this for two decades.”

          Nope.
          They’ve been tracking those who do not search for lowest prices and then not showing those lowest prices.
          They have NOT been: “… determine[ing] every consumers net worth at checkout and modify prices according to what each can “afford”.”

    2. Sounds like a plan to encourage entrepreneurship. “Shop Here – One price for All.”

    3. From each according to ability, to each according to need, eh?

      1. He is a fan of the “well-ordered society”, after all.

        1. I’m a fan of spontaneous order, which comes from human action, not human design.

    4. you’ll just create a black market – the invisible hand sees all attempts to circumvent it

  5. Pretty sure it was Jeb Bush who, after hurricane “X”, prohibited sellers from raising the price of generators and made sure those things stayed in warehouses all over the south instead of moving to Florida where they could be used.

    1. I had a backup generator installed last year. It was delayed a few weeks because Generac was apparently moving as many generators as they could down to the Carolinas after Hurricane Florence. I wonder if that would happen with a major hit to Florida.

      1. Absolutely.

        If they have a supply of 10,000 generators per month that they are selling at $5,000 each – a sudden surge of demand in Florida willing to pay $9,000 each for 35,000 generators is going to distort the market for quite some time.

        Absent anti-gouging law, they would lay in extra shifts and up production as much as possible to take advantage of this spike in demand before it fades away.

        1. That’s the point I’m trying to make. With the anti-gouging law in place, there’s no financial incentive to re-route the generators to Florida. They might do it for the public relations value, but that’s it.

        2. “Absent anti-gouging law, they would lay in extra shifts and up production as much as possible to take advantage of this spike in demand before it fades away.”

          Of course they would! No business person ever examines the cause of a spike in demand! They simply ramp up production and wait to lose money!
          Sarcasm, I presume…

    2. Is there anything you can actually use to verify that assertion or was this a post from your Facebook friend Toby “Totally Not Russian Spy From Vladivostok” Watson?

      1. “Is there anything you can actually use to verify that assertion or was this a post from your Facebook friend Toby “Totally Not Russian Spy From Vladivostok” Watson?”

        Sure, shitstain; even a caveman can do it, but YOU can’t:
        “TALLAHASSEE — Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services Commissioner Charles H. Bronson is extending the hours of operation of the Department’s price-gouging hotline, keeping it activated throughout the weekend.
        The hotline was activated on Thursday immediately after Governor Jeb Bush declared a state of emergency. Florida law prohibits charging excessive or exorbitant prices for essential items (such as gas, shelter, food, water, generators, batteries and lumber) once a state of emergency has been declared. Price increases that can be attributed to increased costs to the retailer are allowed.”
        https://swflorida.blogspot.com/2005/07/hurricane-price-gouging-hotline.html

        Fuck off and die, you pathetic piece of shit.

        1. It’s almost like he likes to be called stupid. Some sort of weird fetish?

  6. The plan is for all the folks who can’t buy stuff because it’s not affordable to ship and sell it for the mandated price to loot Mar A Lago, thus punishing Trump for something.

  7. Well agree with some of the people here also check Best Pubg Names

  8. Government is like so amazing it can repeal basic laws of economics, like supply and demand! All hail God Government! I just wish God Government would tweak the law of gravity so I could lose a few pounds.

    1. The sad fact is that you really believe you’re clever.

      1. “The sad fact is that you really believe you’re clever.”

        The sad fact is that your mother hates you.
        Fuck off and die.

        1. I know being a dick is part of your shtick, but it doesn’t encourage people to listen when you make great points from the position of a libertarian who has an understanding of economics.

          Then again the average IQ in this place dropped by a good thirty points after the cool kids left, and dropped another ten when the new crop came in, so I guess it doesn’t really matter.

          1. That almost hurt my feelings.

          2. “I know being a dick is part of your shtick, but it doesn’t encourage people to listen when you make great points from the position of a libertarian who has an understanding of economics.”

            Do you think EO, Tony, Hihn, turd, the asshole bigot are here to learn anything at all?

            1. They aren’t the only ones who read the comments.

              1. Yeah all us low IQ new commentators also read them.

                Maybe you live in some sort of fantasy world where Reason comments mean something.

                1. Good point.

                  These comments were once a place of intelligent debate, a place where one could actually learn something.

                  Now it’s just a bunch of monkeys throwing shit at each other.

      2. The sad fact is that you can’t rebut my sarcasm with an actual argument, and instead resort to personal insults.

  9. But price gouging punishes the stupid, and laws against gouging enable unconstrained stupid, otherwise know as Democracy.

  10. Geez, what color is the sky in your world? It’s certainly not hurricane-colored. It’s not high prices signaling anything, it’s that hurricane. If you’re too stupid to know about the hurricane, how are high prices going to make you smarter? As far as hoarding, if prices are too high, some people won’t be able to buy anything, so how is that good? And you can’t even be consistent — that “husband and father” doing the hoarding could certainly resell what he’s got and thereby become one of your Stossel entrepreneurs.

    This comment not approved by Silicon Valley brain slugs.

    1. “This comment not approved by Silicon Valley brain slugs.”

      Nor is is approved by anyone with two brain cells; you seem to be lacking a second.

    2. I’ll have what you’re having.

    3. Yes, some people won’t be able to afford higher prices. What is this supposed to be an argument for? That’s always the case for everything. Is this news to you? So prices should not be raised, ever?

    4. Reality is pretty simple, bub.

      Economics is the study of scarcity. Definition number zero is that scarce things, by definition, are not available to everyone that wants them at the price they are willing to pay.

      Or to put it another way: scarce things are rationed, whether by price, time, corruption, or lottery.

      Corollary: scarce means some people just don’t get some.

      As my t-shirt with the picture of Stalin says: “Dark humor is like food: not everybody gets it.”

      Or for you, a customized version at no charge: “Economics is like food: not everybody gets it.”

      Price has the advantage of also being information — it tells suppliers to bring in more supply.

      Notice how corruption (which is another name for bureaucrats pulling the strings) is just the opposite — the last thing a bureaucrat wants to to bring in more supplies and reduce how much people are willing to pay in bribes.

      1. Government doesn’t want the market to function and bring in more supplies because it will make FEMA look bad. Like they need any help.

    5. Funnily enough, prices convey information.

      Rising prices convey information that something is happening that demands you conserve the items whose price is rising.

      You don’t need to know *why* – you only need to pay attention to the price signal which tells you shortages are on the way.

      1. You don’t need to know *why*

        That’s the most beautiful part – what Hayek called the “economy of information” in prices, that you get just the information you need.

  11. Yep. Yesterday I saw a guy on the news who was filling up all 4 tanks on his 2 trucks, as well as the tanks on his boat, and his car. In the photo, he had 5 gas cans lines up so I assume he was filling those as well. If gas was $20 a gallon, he might rethink that.

  12. The storm has veered north the Depot is getting a lot of returns in a few days.

  13. Apparently there are mass shootings ongoing on in Texas. Early reports say someone commandeered a postal vehicle and is going around randomly shooting people. A separate shooter, reportedly, is driving around shooting people in a similar fashion in a different city in Texas.

    What’s a Second Amendment supporter supposed to do at this point–hope that it’s Al Qaeda?

    My heart goes out to the victims.

    1. “What’s a Second Amendment supporter supposed to do at this point–hope that it’s Al Qaeda?”

      Keep your gun on you and watch out for postal vehicles.

      1. Texas? I’m surprised nobody is shooting back.

        1. I imagine they have been.

          1. Suspect shot and killed.

    2. He literally went postal.

      Thoughts and prayers.

      1. Okay apparently a baby was shot (no news cites, I just heard from a friend who has family in Odessa). Horrifying.

    3. “What’s a Second Amendment supporter supposed to do at this point–hope that it’s Al Qaeda?”
      Mention that when the government has the total monopoly, there’s a good chance that the victim-count is in the high millions.

      “My heart goes out to the victims.”
      And their friends and families, especially as they get to listen to the lefties claiming they can ‘fix the problem with one more law!!!!’

  14. One thing that has changed this equation somewhat is modern supply chain management. Walmart is of course at the forefront of this, but big chains have to compete with them, and their supply chains are similarly advanced.

    After I moved to Florida in 2000 the first couple of hurricanes I experienced were still old-school to some degree. Walmart and Publix ran out of water and we were told “the Truck comes on Tuesday”. That’s it. Our shipment comes when it comes.

    Now things are very different. Walmart was getting daily shipments of water. Staff was available to stock it immediately – so people were buying water as it came in. There were shortages – but only for hours at a time.

    They’ve also learned about the generator supply. Everyone is out of generators, but they are still periodically able to shift generators to local stores from across the country. So there are a lot more generators available than there were previously.

    Of course, they’ve also learned about hurricane season. So Lowe’s, Home Depot et. al. had big hurricane supply displays this summer with stacks of generators, in a “Know your customer” display of marketing.

    Gasoline supply is better than in the past as well, but it is still less responsive than the others, probably due to limited last mile transportation capability. There are only so many trucks to go around. But they are arranging more shipments than normal.

    One government interference that has made a difference – they have passed a law requiring that gas stations have generators to run their pumps. After Wilma this was a big deal. Large areas of the state could not get gas because the electricity was out. In events since this has not been a problem because of the generators. Then it is down to logistics – can the fuel trucks get through to the stores? This is a much shorter-term problem.

  15. This is the most ridiculous pencil-dicked libertarian horseshit I’ve ever read. And you’re Reason.

    Prices send information. Gee, thanks. They send the information that you’re being screwed. You’re welcome, peasant!

    1. “Prices send information. Gee, thanks. They send the information that you’re being screwed. You’re welcome, peasant!”

      Here’s shitbag to prove once more his level of ‘thinking’ approaches that achieved by most of us at age 3 or 4.
      Great job; keep it up. We need a village idiot, and we’re pleased you’ve volunteered for it even if you haven’t figured it out.

    2. Everything is so terrible and unfair.

      1. Maybe one day shitbag will accept that s/he is responsible for her/his welfare and take the appropriate steps rather than waiting fort mommy to pro…
        Naaaah.

    3. So you’d rather no one know they’re being screwed?

      1. How about we use the tools of civilization that we’ve so carefully cultivated over thousands of years to mitigate the amount of screwing going on in the world?

        Oh, you believe in doing exactly the opposite of that in order to appease some pseudo-philosophical OCD antigovernment tic? Okay then, carry on.

        1. Tony
          September.2.2019 at 1:58 pm
          “How about we use the tools of civilization that we’ve so carefully cultivated over thousands of years to mitigate the amount of screwing going on in the world?”

          Shitbag here is on board for the 2nd act of “Village Idiot”; he’ll be here all week.
          Hint, shitbag, that’s exactly what the market does.

  16. This is another ridiculous attempt to justify price gouging. Rules restricting over pricing are not an attempt to control the economy, they are a buttress again societal breakdown. If people see that stores can over charge them they will comply for a while and when the opportunity presents itself they loot and burn. Same reason store limit purchases. Hoarding is not something people respond well to. What is in it for the merchant. Yes they can make a quick profit but people will remember and when the crisis is over they may not have any customers. The free market is great, but you have to understand when it does not apply.

    1. Moderation4ever
      September.1.2019 at 4:59 pm
      “This is another ridiculous attempt to justify price gouging.”

      No, actually, here’s another idiotic attempt to justify said laws:
      ” Rules restricting over pricing are not an attempt to control the economy, they are a buttress again societal breakdown. If people see that stores can over charge them they will comply for a while and when the opportunity presents itself they loot and burn.”

      I don’t know where you live, but I certainly hope it is as violent as that and you are no longer around to post your idiocy.

    2. What is in it for the merchant. Yes they can make a quick profit but people will remember and when the crisis is over they may not have any customers.

      So you’re saying people are stupid and need the firm hand of ‘Top Men’ to tell them what to do in all aspects of their lives?

      Because it would seem to me that merchant’s would notice if gouging before disasters lost them business after. And then they would ‘behave accordingly’.

  17. Unfortunately, price gouging laws have an important effect, especially in times of short but urgent need. It’s important to weigh the pros and cons of reversing these laws.

    1. Pro: Being able to increase prices of goods allows more of the needed good to move into the area, even at elevated prices. It also prevents (to a certain extent) hoarding, as people will buy less of something at an elevated price.

    2. Con: Price gouging encourages a few less charitable individuals or companies to buy up as much as the necessary good(s) they can before the event hits, thus causing a shortage. These individuals can then sell the good at quite elevated prices, making themselves a profit. Even if they only sell 50% of the goods that they bring in, if they sell each at 300% markup, they make a very nice profit. Long term supply cannot catch up to the short term local demand.

    In general, the cons outweigh the pros. The artificial short term demand spike doesn’t allow for proper laws of supply and demand to catch up. Indeed, necessary goods can sit in a warehouse, in order to keep local prices very high.

    1. “2. Con: Price gouging encourages a few less charitable individuals or companies to buy up as much as the necessary good(s) they can before the event hits, thus causing a shortage. These individuals can then sell the good at quite elevated prices, making themselves a profit. Even if they only sell 50% of the goods that they bring in, if they sell each at 300% markup, they make a very nice profit. Long term supply cannot catch up to the short term local demand. ”

      Cite missing and I’m sure it will never show up. Suffice to say, that’s a bullshit claim absent any evidence at all.

    2. 2. Con: Price gouging encourages a few less charitable individuals or companies to buy up as much as the necessary good(s) they can before the event hits, thus causing a shortage.

      You guys keep analyzing this in isolation.

      If everything is bought out early – then the price signal to get more stuff there is being sent early. Meaning that suppliers will be mobilizing to send more stuff to sell there earlier, meaning that the shortage period post-disaster will be shorter.

  18. I quit working at shoprite and now I make $30h – $72h…how? I’m working online! My work didn’t exactly make me happy so I decided to take a chance on something new… after 4 years it was so hard to quit my day job but now I couldn’t be happier.

    Heres what I’ve been doing… ,,,

    CLICK HERE►► ONLINE WORK

  19. damn i can’t imagine how it is to lose everything you own in a hurricane
    خدمات ویپ

  20. Price gouging cannot be justified because of the “information” it might supply. It is about taking advantage of people’s desperation. If my wife took the attitude that price gouging is acceptable in her medical practice, imagine what she could charge someone who came in bleeding heavily, or in cardiac distress.
    The idea of open markets and open borders fails to take into account the darker sides of human nature.

    1. MaxBlancke
      September.2.2019 at 4:24 pm
      “Price gouging cannot be justified because of the “information” it might supply.”

      Fuck off, slaver.

  21. If I had a store and tried to sell a bottle of water for 4 buck at a disaster, what crime have I committed exactly? How I have injured or wronged someone? You could make the argument that it’s immoral for a merchant to take advantage of low supply to turn a profit, but surely a government shouldn’t put a man jail for violation of a moral code. I mean that’s what those right conservatives, do right?

    I think people confuse gouging with price fixing or collusion. Price gouging is already effectively legal. There’s a reason why a churro in Disneyland cost 5 bucks, whereas one in Costco cost maybe 2 bucks.

    1. “Price gouging” is an invented term with no application at all.

    2. Who are you kidding?

      The concept of right versus wrong is based on ethics and morality.

      If you want to live with all the benefits that only civilization affords, you need to accept its core principles.

      If not, I’m sure there is some shithole you can emigrate to where your skull will eventually adorn someone’s dashboard.

      1. So get down with collectivism, right?

        Go open up a history book. Find me a civilization in which the lower class perpetually accepted and bowed to ethics and code instituted by their ruling class.

        It’s wrong to be a neo nazi and hate on people of color. A free society will tolerate his right to his views as long as he doesn’t hurt others. A nation that codifies tolerance and goes after these individuals or any purported racists is not a just one.

        If your car broke down and I offered you a ride back home for 50 bucks, you could call me a jerk. But again, what crime have I committed? If I never offered you that deal, does your situation improve?

        1. Ethics and morality, civilization, is not only about laws.

          Perhaps you would like first responders to demand payment before they save your life.

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