public education

De Blasio Advisory Group Wants To Abolish Gifted Classes in NYC Public Schools

"It was the year 2019, and everybody was finally equal."

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New York City Mayor and 15th-ranked Democratic presidential candidate Bill de Blasio professed his hatred last month for the "charter school movement," "high-stakes testing," and other educational policies bequeathed to him by his reform-friendly predecessor, Michael Bloomberg. Beginning Tuesday, de Blasio, who enjoys sweeping control over his city's school system, has a golden opportunity to act upon his prejudice.

The mayor's hand-picked School Diversity Advisory Group (SDAG) came out yesterday with a detailed set of recommendations to "desegregate" New York's public schools. Among the proposals: Phase out most gifted and talented programs and the tests upon which they are based, eliminate almost all criteria having to do with student performance (for instance, no more auditions for performing arts schools), and radically overhaul admissions policies so that "all schools represent the socioeconomic and racial diversity of their community school district within the next three years, and by their borough in the first five years…[and] the city as a whole" within 10.

That last sweeping item in particular illustrates the overarching goal that dominates discussion of New York's public education system (in which both of my daughters are enrolled). The report, consistent with the advisory group's name and leadership (the three co-chairs are Hispanic Federation President José Calderón, NAACP New York State Conference President Hazel Dukes, and Maya Wiley, senior vice president for social justice at the New School), is fundamentally mobilized around the issue of demographic composition, rather than the problem of school quality.

The most telling statistics concern not the vast achievement gap between, say, charter schools and traditional public institutions among otherwise comparable populations of poor and minority kids, but rather the fact that whites and Asians disproportionately make it through most school "screens," whether they be tests that can be prepped for, or simple attendance criteria that can (with effort) be met.

"The current 'Screened' and Gifted and Talented programs…segregate students by race and socioeconomic status," the report concludes. "Today they have become proxies for separating students who can and should have opportunities to learn together…These programs segregate students by race, class, abilities and language and perpetuate stereotypes about student potential and achievement."

The New York Department of Education, with 1.1 million students (including 123,000 serviced by charters), is the country's largest. It contains all sorts of anomalies, and the gifted and talented emphasis—which kids can start testing for at age four—is definitely one. According to The New York Times, "Last year, New York's elementary school gifted classes enrolled about 16,000 students and were nearly 75 percent white and Asian." This is in a system whose overall ethnic composition is 41 percent Latino, 26 percent black, 16 percent Asian, and 15 percent white, with 73 percent of kids defined as living in poverty. The city's political class has been on its heels ever since an influential 2014 report from University of California, Los Angeles' Civil Rights Project concluded that Gotham is "home to the largest and one of the most segregated public school systems in the nation."

Striving for uniform demographics among schools even within a sub-district, let alone a full district—or borough, or city—requires mandating that more students travel further distances away from neighborhoods that have different racial or socioeconomic concentration than the average. In a city full of ethnic clusters and housing projects, that's basically all of them.

An example: At the elementary school my eldest daughter just graduated from, just 12 percent of the student population either qualifies for free or reduced-price student lunch, lives in temporary housing, or is learning English as a second language. (These proxies for poverty and disadvantage frequently overlap with racial categories, and are routinely—if sloppily—used to measure racial composition.) The combined rate of the seven schools in our area is more like 30 percent, ranging from a low of 11 percent to a high of 100.

To recalibrate the percentage of disadvantaged kids at each sub-district school to between 25 and 35, as is the current goal of the re-zoning process, will require many more 5-year-olds having to travel further than walking distance to kindergarten, in a dense swath of South Brooklyn. When I pointed out at a Community Education Council meeting in June that such increases in travel hassle will necessarily lead to "a lot of unhappy parents," a woman bearing a strong resemblance to Elizabeth Warren snapped back at me: "You mean a lot of unhappy white parents!"

Which is not at all what I meant, though it is representative of the dialogue accompanying these changes—including and especially from district officials themselves.

"I can't tell you how many times I hear in this discussion where there's an equation [of] diversity and a lowering of academic standards," Richard Carranza, New York City's school chancellor, said at a contentious public meeting in May. "I will call that racist every time I hear it…So if you don't want me to call you on it, don't say it." (Carranza is currently being sued for $90 million by three fired ex-administrators who allege his actions stemmed from anti-white bias, litigation that a de Blasio spokeswoman characterized as a "racially charged smear campaign.")

In its brief advocating the discontinuation of specialized schooling, the SDAG cast the very notion of gifted and talented programs as at least abetting overt acts of institutional racism.

"While Brown vs. Board of Education mandated school integration in 1954, gifted programs were used as a method of avoiding required integration," the report stated. "A wave of new gifted programs were founded in the 1970s…This wave also coincided with a number of national resegregation efforts, which used anti-school busing legislation and other tactics to clandestinely reinstitute separated schools."

A layman might read such a formulation as suggesting that gifted and talented programs are a tool for keeping colored people out. In fact, as adopted in New York City over the past three decades, they were an attempt to bring the middle and upper-middle classes back into a public system that they had long since abandoned. And by that standard, the trend was unquestionably a success: School "uptake"—the percentage of resident K-8 kids enrolled in government-run educational institutions—jumped from 67 percent in 2000 to 76 percent in 2010.

But there are different standards in 2019.

As subscribers to The New York Times have come to learn, white and Asian parents are problematic for leaving the public school system (or the city as a whole), but they're also problematic for staying in. "If a substantial number of those families leave the system," noted Times reporter Eliza Shapiro, "it would be even more difficult to achieve integration." And yet:

As the city has tried for decades to improve its underperforming schools, it has long relied on accelerated academic offerings and screened schools, including the specialized high schools, to entice white families to stay in public schools.

But at the same time, white, Asian and middle-class families have sometimes exacerbated segregation by avoiding neighborhood schools, and instead choosing gifted programs or other selective schools. In gentrifying neighborhoods, some white parents have rallied for more gifted classes, which has in some cases led to segregated classrooms within diverse schools.

Eagle-eyed observers may note a crucial gap in the desegregationists' story—did the old system hurt or help students, and will the proposed new system improve on that? Here, de Blasio's SDAG engages in a lot of "yeah, but"-ing.

"Schools with exclusionary screens continually outperform the city mean for academic achievement and graduation rate," the report acknowledges, but that's "due to their selection policies." Sure, "many of these schools have high graduation rates and/or high standardized test scores," but "these statistics are not necessarily reflective of the quality of the school since many of these schools are populated by students who are considered 'high achieving.'"

What about those Asian immigrants who manage to bust ass and have their children succeed? "There are low-income communities, especially in New York City, where families make significant sacrifices to fund test prep and children spend large amounts of time preparing and sacrificing other developmentally appropriate activities to gain admission and do so at an unnecessary cost. This is not equitable even if it is effective for some." (Emphasis mine.)

Conclusion: "Schools that use exclusionary admission models must be reformed if their enrollment policies continue to enact inequity."

Will de Blasio follow the suggestions of his hand-picked panel? It's not clear, though the mayor did adopt 62 of the SDAG's previous slate of 67 diversity recommendations. Regardless, we can see which way the wind is blowing in New York, in other heavily Democratic polities, and maybe in a district near you: Inequality of outcome will be treated as equivalent to inequality of opportunity. Demographic leveling will be prioritized more than improving school quality for all kids.

And if all this effort fails? We'll know who to blame.

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  1. “”(for instance, no more auditions for performing arts schools)””

    DeBlazio thinks the talentless should be equal to the talented. Which may explain him running for president.

    1. This. The fact that such “equality” shit doesn’t immediately get, um, laughed off the stage is incredible.

    2. Rush has a song, Trees, and it’s an allegory. The oaks are just too lofty and the grab up all the light. The only way to make them equal was by hatchet, axe, and saw. It’s depressing to see this happening in my lifetime.

      1. Are you calling the ignorant maples? That had to be racist. I don’t know how but I’m sure intersectionality will agree somehow.

    3. The educational form of lysenkoism.

      I wonder whether they are going to require that all of the sports teams “look like the city demographics”, as well – short Italians playing basketball, including representation as the center, and on football teams with proportional representation at every position, and for the same amount of time, in every game. Boys wrestling girls, and girls included in the mix, as well. Will girls be required to play center, with the quarterback taking the snap between her legs? The requirement for equal representation in the arts will drive the artsy set crazy. This may be very interesting to watch. Too bad that the kids are the real victims who will end up really screwed up.

  2. It’s probably better off that nobody expects the real minorities to strive for intelligence or work hard to achieve anything.

    1. That’s the irony. It as if he is confirming that minorities can’t compete with whitey therefore they need to lower the bar. It’s a false notion and it’s an insult to minorities.

      Many of today’s top notch minority musicians from NYC graduated from LaGuardia Music and Art High School. The high school from which the movie/show Fame was based. They had no problem with the audition process.

  3. In other words their kids can’t handle the competition so they will eliminate it and dumb down everyone and gifted kids will now be screwed over of any chance of advancement out of their shit holes

  4. Yep, the Diana Moon Glampers approach, aka the Democrat Party platform.

    1. Beat me to it. I was about to reference “Harrison Bergeron”.

  5. Simple solution: assign every student purely randomly. You might make allowance for siblings to go to the same school, but that’s not really necessary since random assignment means that practically every kid is going to have to take a bus, and in fact you could add a small wrinkle to the assigner to make sure that no kid is within 1 mile of their assigned school.

    1. Woe to the kid from the northwest Bronx who gets randomly placed in a school in southeast Queens.

    2. Why not just have classes on the buses? Kids could ride for an hour with a Social Studies driver to a different borough and then transfer to a Math driver

      1. Why not just skip the classes altogether, since nothing in DeBlasio’s plan will actually improve them?

      2. LOL!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    3. Or you could allow them to be within a mile but make them ride a bus that goes to queens first and then to the school.

  6. It’s so gross. All these people see is skin color.

    1. That and there cherished “solutions” cannot overcome the fact the poor kids are just not as smart as…well, never mind.

    2. “It’s so gross. All these people see is skin color.”

      I think they see $$$ in their pockets thanks to a government created and enforced monopoly on public funded education. They just use skin color, to help ensure they keep that $$$ flowing into their pockets. That would be the teachers, and the Democrat politicians who get a lot of campaign cash from them, and reward them with big budgets and salaries.

      If DeBlasio really wanted better educations, he’d end the government monopoly on taxing people to fund government schools. Then with people actually paying for their kids educations, or funding via government education vouchers (to be used for any school), then the market would produce schools that educate well at low costs. And these costs would be far less of an insult and harm to taxpayers.

  7. Expect a disorganized, inept drama school dropout to be put in charge of phasing out these programs, tests, and criteria and given whatever budget he/she requires to complete the task. No charter schools or gifted programs will be directly closed by any such action, they’ll be taxed and strangled of funds to support the leviathan (not) trying to close them down.

    1. “…they’ll be taxed and strangled of funds to support the leviathan (not) trying to close them down.” A lot like gun control there.

  8. I live in Chicago and have kids in the gifted CPS programs, which are surprisingly great. This kind of talk scares the shit out of me.

    (the school on the whole is 33/33/33 white black latino, but the gifted classes are >90% white/asian, so the target is clearly painted)

    1. Disparity may not exist, especially when you can discern a color line along the disparity. So, at the end of the next day, everyone will just be mediocre at best and great strides will have been made to reduce disparity.

  9. “and radically overhaul admissions policies so that “all schools represent the socioeconomic and racial diversity of their community school district within the next three years, and by their borough in the first five years…[and] the city as a whole” within 10.”

    Thus re-segregating the entire school system, so we can go back and start over yelling ‘racist’ at the people who had nothing to do with it.

  10. The part that disturbs me the most is requiring all schools to mirror the demographics of the city within 10 years. This is blatantly majoritarian and should scare everyone because demographics are constantly changing. There will always be people who voluntarily associate with their own kind, so every school will have at least one of these solutions forced upon them:
    1. Bussing in both directions
    2. Increased taxation
    3. Increased municipal/state control

    A 90% African American neighborhood will have to bus in other kids and send their own kids out to other schools. Have fun telling parents their kids can’t be near home with their friends and social groups for the sake of diversifying someone else’s education.

    Remember, anyone can be a minority at any time depending on your local situation. Applying city-wide and state-wide statistics to your locale is a recipe for disaster.

    1. Whites, and now Asians, can and will never qualify as a minority. They sons of bitches tend to do too well on standardized test, which must also be done away with along with gifted programs and anything else that can project an appearance of disparity. We must all be the same. unless you belong to a protected class and then you can complain about not being the same.

    2. The Govt. forced desegregation of schools in the 1960’s is what tore apart the stable black family unit & fine black schools & fine black towns as well! They have never returned!

  11. “all schools represent the socioeconomic and racial diversity of their community school district within the next three years, and by their borough in the first five years…[and] the city as a whole” within 10.

    So schools in Harlem are going to have to start bussing in white kids within 5 years

  12. So what are the criteria for the gifted programs that black and latino students do not qualify for them at the same rates as white and asian students?

    Whatever the case is having the goal as merely evening up the racial mix will likely have suboptimal consequences for academic performance and parental reaction.

  13. This is very simple: DeBlasio is a communist, through and through.

  14. I’m sure de Blasio is proud of his great leap forward.

    1. He seems set on this final solution to school diversity.

  15. I was identified as ‘gifted’ in third grade. All it did was put a target on my back for bullies to harass and assault me for the ‘crime’ of being smart. Those programs should be abolished for that reason alone.

    1. I’m sure you would have been bullied anyway

      1. Nope. No one ever bothered me before that. I kept a low profile and was practically invisible–which is how I liked it.

    2. I on the other hand just missed the cutoff (came to the district too late) to get into the advanced track and had to fight like hell to finally get into AP level classes. Those classes were the only time I wasn’t completely certain that my time was being wasted in secondary school.

      The US needs to start moving our academically poor students to quality trade schools at about age 12 and get them doing something they can do well, make some money, and maybe even be proud of.

      1. I was in AP classes throughout school and it always pissed me off that I got so much more homework than my friends in regular classes. And it was all a waste of time since I was too poor to go to college, and too white and male to qualify for financial aid.

    3. I was considered gifted in math so they jumped me a full grade the problem was now i was a year behind, no speed up course. so now i did poorly there and they sent me back and now i was behind the original class and totally lost and did poorly there as well and the teacher told me ” i guess you aren’t so gifted after all” I just sat there like the dumfounded 3rd grader I was since they created the situation not me. schools screw up more kids than parents do

      1. You just reinforced my impression that a big number of teachers are garbage people.

  16. (the three co-chairs are Hispanic Federation President José Calderón, NAACP New York State Conference President Hazel Dukes, and Maya Wiley, senior vice president for social justice at the New School)

    Let that sink in for a moment. Just marinate on that pick-list for juust a few moments.

    1. That Senior Vice President for Social Justice title caught my attention at my first reading.

      Senior Vice President, which means there is definitely a president, and possibly several sub vice presidents, for a whole fucking department of Social Fucking Justice.

      Which reminds me of that movie “Escape from NY, NY” starring Kurt Russell. Fucking prescient, that one was.

    2. Here’s what I see. The same “people” who tell us that no one insufficiently credentialed with Education degrees (the Cracker Jack prize of academic credentials) are unqualified to make judgements about educational outcomes or processes, are quick enough to staff their whole educational policy council with people with no actual educational experience.

      Lying hypocrites.

    3. I barfed before I could let it marinate!

  17. University of California, Los Angeles’ Civil Rights Project concluded that Gotham is “home to the largest and one of the most segregated public school systems in the nation.”

    Nothing snaps a Democrat into action faster than showing them scientific evidence that they’re racist.

    1. They know they’re racists, they just don’t like when someone points it out. Anyways, they’re benevolent racists, who just want what’s best for “those people”.

      1. Yes, most white progressives suffer from white savior complex. It’s all an updated version of white man’s burden. The things is, is that many minorities are seeing through it.

  18. When I pointed out at a Community Education Council meeting in June that such increases in travel hassle will necessarily lead to “a lot of unhappy parents,” a woman bearing a strong resemblance to Elizabeth Warren snapped back at me: “You mean a lot of unhappy white parents!”

    It’s ok, Matt, she probably recognized you from your Fox News appearances.

    1. He should have pointed out all the unhappy Asian parents, too.

    2. Wait until they eliminate all testing for the top high schools like Stuyvesant and Bronx High School of science. All the Asian and Jewish parents who were counting on these schools to prepare their kids for Harvard, MIT and Cal Tech will burn down City Hall.

      I went to Stuyvesant HS in the early 60’s and the competition there was brutal but everyone in my graduating class went to college (well, one did go to jail but that’s another story).

    3. Because black parents LIKE having their kids spending 2+ hours in a fucking bus all day?

      That’s what I would have responded to that Warren-lookalike cretin.

      1. Busing kids 2 hours a day. Finally, something that will unite the races – hatred of idiots playing politics with children’s lives.

  19. All this will accomplish is a repeat of the 1960s, when people fled the cities in order to have their kids attend better schools in the suburbs. Then the DeBlasios of the world will piss and moan about “white flight” and condemn it as racist, just like they did in the 1960s.

    Of course, when the middle class started to return the cities in the late 1970s, the DeBlasios of the world started pissing and moaning about “gentrification” and condemning that as racist.

    There’s just no dealing with us white people….

    1. “There’s just no dealing with us white people….”

      That’s a fucking bumper sticker, right there.

    2. “There’s just no dealing with us white people….” LOL

    3. when the middle class started to return the cities in the late 1970s 1990s

  20. As a recovering public school teacher, and I can tell you that dumping everyone into one big mixing pot classroom ain’t gonna help. Teaching to the bottom only wastes the talent of the cream of the crop who could actually amount to something, while teaching only the brainiacs in a mixed classroom is nearly impossible while the future welfare cases are snoring loudly (at best).

    DeBlasio and his committee see only skin color and suckers for the “they’ve got more than you” tripe.

    1. I was going to say that putting a waste case next to a smart kid in an AP Calculus course might not have the intended effects.

      1. Putting waste cases next to smart kids during testing has been shown to improve the scores of the waste cases.

        Make of that what you will.

      2. Ah, but there won’t be an AP Calculus course.

        1. AP Gender Studies? Graded on a color curve?

  21. Inequality of outcome will be treated as equivalent to inequality of opportunity. Demographic leveling will be prioritized more than improving school quality for all kids.

    Check out Jordan Peterson over here.

    1. I thought of him while watching Dave Chapelle’s Sticks and Stones last evening. They should pair up and go on a fuck you comedy/ commentary tour. I’d see it.

  22. eliminate almost all criteria having to do with student performance (for instance, no more auditions for performing arts schools)

    “You want to be famous? Well, fame costs. And right here is where you start paying – in progressivism”.

    /Fame, The Next Generation

  23. Someone needs to tell DeBlasio that Harrison Bergeron was a satire, not a playbook.

  24. Aspiring pols like Deblasio see that lack of engagement of African American voters as the root cause of their not winning. Therefore, the entire world is seen through the lens of having to get black people to vote en bloc for them, so they listen to what the Hispanic Federation President José Calderón, NAACP New York State Conference President Hazel Dukes, and Maya Wiley, senior vice president for social justice at the New School have to say, believing that this will fix their problem.

    1. There’s a saying that those who can, do and those who can’t, teach – but how pathetic must you be to be an educational administrator who apparently can’t even teach? Why would you ever consider taking advice from somebody like that? Like getting diet advice from Michael Moore. Or fashion tips from Michael Moore. Or personal hygiene instructions from Michael Moore. Or etiquette lessons from Michael Moore.

      1. I had a neighbor, who was involved in some local journalism, who had the misfortune to literally rub up against [passively, on her part] Sir Tub-o-Lard at a function a few years back. Said it took a while to get over the stench. I don’t believe she has donned a sleeveless dress since.

      2. That saying finishes with…

        Those who can’t teach – administrate.

        Those who can’t administrate – administrate.

  25. “Last year, New York’s elementary school gifted classes enrolled about 16,000 students and were nearly 75 percent white and Asian.” This is in a system whose overall ethnic composition is 41 percent Latino, 26 percent black, 16 percent Asian, and 15 percent white,>

    I wonder why the Times didn’t break down that “75% white and Asian” number a little further.

    I lied, I don’t wonder. I know why.

    1. I’ve heard that my old high school (Stuyvesant) is now around 70% Asian. I’m not surprised, Asians are the last group that are too poor to go to private schools but still push their kids to succeed. The city shouldn’t worry, in ten years the Asians will be in private schools too.

  26. Egalitarianism is funny

    1. If you want to see real equality, visit a graveyard. Socialism “equalized” about 100 million people.

  27. “De Blasio Advisory Group Wants To Abolish Gifted Classes in NYC Public Schools.”

    This is a great idea.
    This way, even the gifted students can be as illiterate, ignorant and stupid as their fellow classmates.
    Isn’t equality wonderful?

  28. I’m not sure they legally CAN abolish gifted classes, at least while keeping their federal funding. A lot of gifted programs fall under the Feds’ “special needs” mandates. The logic is that its a learning disorder because gifted students tend to lose interest while the rest of the class is catching up. An aggressive administration could, at least theoretically, tell DeBlasio to pound sand and continue the classes.

  29. It’s perpetually frustrating for the left, as reality will not conform to their idealism. Yet they’ll keep paving the road to hell by trying to create their utopian fantasy-world of equal outcomes. White leftists will never learn because their underlying messianic narcissism demands that they “fix” the world, while many non-whites will buy into the agenda because they want “pay-back” for (both real and imagined) past oppression. It’d be funny if it wasn’t so damn destructive.

  30. I’d take old, dementia-ridden, conspiracy-addled, Trump-fellating Rudy Giuliani as mayor of NYC over this guy.

    1. There are skid-row junkies that could do a better job than DeBlasio.

  31. Anytime there is an article about De ASSio you can be assured of three things…its stupid…no one wants it…and its racist. This one holds true to form.

  32. I never though I’d long for the days of Bloomberg.

  33. The effect of such a move, of course, will be to increase the number of gifted children from poor families taught Catholic theology.

    1. My kids went to Catholic schools (sometimes). I found it was a wonderful inoculation AGAINST religion — probably reducing the chance that they would become entranced with a cult as young adults.

      Our experience is that very few of the heathens we knew who attended Catholic schools become Catholics. Actually NONE that we are aware of.

  34. Rush has a song, Trees, and it’s an allegory. The oaks are just too lofty and the grab up all the light. The only way to make them equal was by hatchet, axe, and saw. It’s depressing to see this happening in my lifetime. Here they are:
    There is unrest in the forest
    There is trouble with the trees
    For the maples want more sunlight
    And the oaks ignore their pleas
    The trouble with the maples
    And they’re quite convinced they’re right
    They say the oaks are just too lofty
    And they grab up all the light
    But the oaks can’t help their feelings
    If they like the way they’re made
    And they wonder why the maples
    Can’t be happy in their shade?
    There is trouble in the forest
    And the creatures all have fled
    As the maples scream ‘oppression!’
    And the oaks, just shake their heads
    So the maples formed a union
    And demanded equal rights
    ‘The oaks are just too greedy
    We will make them give us light’
    Now there’s no more oak oppression
    For they passed a noble law
    And the trees are all kept equal
    By hatchet,
    Axe,
    And saw

  35. I have string suspicion that the issue is a personal matter to him; betting he has a lot of ‘participation’ trophies.

  36. Today I heard from my imaginary childhood North Carolina friend. We took different paths.

    My friend became a high official in the KKK. He candidly informed me that Bill DeBlasio is a closet Grand Dragon in the organization — heading the New England branch.

    DeBlasio has became the Klan’s last best white hope. He’s doing more to keep blacks (and other minorities) in their place than all the Klan’s efforts since 1900.

    Klan offspring don’t do well academically, my hallucination informs me. Perhaps something to do with all that inbreeding. It’s a mystery.

    Klan members fear uppity educated blacks taking the (few) good jobs available to the Klan’s knuckle-dragging trailer trash sons and daughters. DeBlasio has come up with the perfect racist policies to bamboozle liberal blacks into thinking he’s actually HELPING them.

    It’s a brilliant ploy — one my KKK fantasy friend hopes and predicts will spread across America — especially in the Democrat urban strongholds where blacks are well represented. And I suspect he just might be clairvoyant in this matter.

  37. Sad. So sad. My guess is that no members of this “Diversity Committee” had even a remote chance of attending one of these special schools. Their collective IQs wouldn’t add up to that of any one of the students who do. And yet they feel qualified to sit in judgement of a decades old quietly successful NYC program. That which the ignorant don’t understand must be torn down. Talk about a bunch of clueless elite morons you need look no further than de Blasio and his “Committee.”

  38. de Blasio is worried that if young people get smarter they won’t vote for him. Surprisingly, the north Carolina chapter of the NAACP, which heavily aligned with the democrat party, is vehemently opposed to charter and magnet schools. More Black students who attend charter and magnet schools graduate and go on to college then those who attend public schools.

  39. Anyone ever see the movie Idiocracy?

  40. My kids are in public school only because our district has a good gifted program. I’m glad this nonsense doesn’t seem to exist (yet) in AZ. If they were to end the program out of ‘fairness’ I would instantly move my kids to a private or charter. I prefer classes with screening, not for filtering out kids by ability but because it almost always means the kids there have involved parents who value education.

    My wife is a public school teacher. She teaches gen pop. A large proportion of the kids don’t give a shit about learning because their parents don’t give a shit if they learn anything. THAT is the environment i want to keep my kids out of.

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