Marijuana

Weed Website Offers Unpaid Federal Workers Free Medical Marijuana That They Can't Legally Smoke

"At a time when the nation's really divided, let's try to do something good," says BudTrader CEO Brad McLaughlin.

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Dmitry Tishchenko/Dreamstime.com

A marijuana-trading website is pitching in to help federal workers affected by the ongoing partial federal government shutdown.

Roughly 800,000 federal government employees are currently furloughed or working without pay as politicians debate funding for a wall on the U.S-Mexico border. For those who also happen to be medical marijuana users, BudTrader is here to help.

"To any Federal Employee unable to pay for their medical cannabis due to the Government shutdown, BudTrader will donate to you the allowable, legal, limit according to California adult use rules and regulations to help ease your suffering in this difficult time," reads a post on the company's Facebook page.

That was back on Monday. Since then, "we've been overwhelmed with emails and social media messages," as well as dozens of phone calls, BudTrader CEO Brad McLaughlin tells Reason. So how do they know the requests are legit, and not just people trying to score some free weed? "We'll ask them what part of the government they work for or what agency they work for," McLaughlin says. "Usually we'll look at their social media pages too."

In lieu of social media information, BudTrader will ask for "follow-up" info or credentials. "You keep it 100 percent confidential because we don't want anybody to lose their job," McLaughlin says.

That's a crucial point. While marijuana is legal in some form or another in 33 states, it's still a no-no for all federal workers, even if they have a valid medical reason.

They can thank former President Ronald Reagan. Back in 1986, Reagan issued an executive order prohibiting both on- and off-duty federal employees from engaging in "the use of illegal drugs," which are defined as "a controlled substance included in Schedule I or II" of the Controlled Substances Act. And despite dozens of states legalizing pot, the Drug Enforcement Administration still classifies marijuana as a Schedule I substance "with no currently accepted medical use and a high potential for abuse."

Just because it's banned doesn't mean they'll get caught, of course. Some federal positions, particularly those in law enforcement, require drug-testing. Other agencies, meanwhile, don't bother.

BudTrader's announcement, meanwhile, appears to be having a ripple effect. "We've seen this big show of support from other cannabis brands, including dispensaries, cannabis doctors, and CBD brands," McLaughlin says. Companies are asking questions like "How can we help?" or "What can we do?" he explains.

"At a time when the nation's really divided, let's try to do something good," he added, summing up those companies' sentiments.

These Bud Samaritans appear to be doing some real good. "We have been able to connect federal employees with participating members of the cannabis community all over the United States," McLaughlin says.

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  1. I SMELL A TRAP. Or maybe that’s just the reefer.

  2. So how do they know the requests are legit, and not just people trying to score some free weed? “We’ll ask them what part of the government they work for or what agency they work for,” McLaughlin says.

    “I work for the Department of *Fun*!” *** giggles uncontrollably ***

    “Usually we’ll look at their social media pages too.”

    “Oh, wow. Does ‘Hit & Run’ count as a social media page?”

  3. Is it only for California medical marijuana card holders?

  4. The first one is free, kid.

  5. These Bud Samaritans appear to be doing some real good.

    Best prose ever.

  6. Keep this in mind about marijuana

    Joe Biden coined the term ‘Drug Czar’ after watching Reefer Madness. According to Biden, the movie set him on a path to have the government warn the nation’s youth about the dangerous marijuana.

    Biden is in constant contact with past and present Drug Czars, and they say that the current marijuana is much more powerful that the hippie weed. So much so, that it’s now considered by them to be not only highly addictive but a gateway drug to LSD.

    Unnamed sources say Biden was maneuvered to be Obama’s Vice President so Biden could keep an eye on him. There was a feeling that Obama would start to smoking marijuana again, even though he swore he was off the stuff. So Biden was there to make sure Obama behaved and did not reclassify marijuana.

  7. At what point does somebody at Cato or IJ get the idea to posit this to SCOTUS: How is pot different from alcohol? The 18th Amendment was understood to be absolutely necessary for the prohibition of demon drink, by what authority can any other substance be outlawed short of a constitutional amendment?

    And to anyone who invokes precedent, I have but two words: “Dred Scott.”

    1. If it can get us legalized heroin I’m all for it. Real heroin, not those garbage ChiCom fentynal analogues.

      I’m too lazy to look it up but there’s some SCOTUS doctrine that say they can’t find something unconstitutional, even if it clearly is, if it migh prove too disruptive to authority, order and the functioning of federal and state government. It’s why the challenge to the Master Settlement Agreement on tobacco went nowhere.

      Spooner was totally right on the Constitution but I take a pragmatic approach that Bible-beaters love them some literal interpretation of ancient texts so sticking with it, as a flawed yet very pro-liberty document, is the proper approach to reduce the government to mewling infant-size that can bathe in Andrea Yates’ tub.

      1. “At what point does somebody at Cato or IJ get the idea to posit this to SCOTUS: How is pot different from alcohol?”

        I don’t think CATO litigates, but in conversation with the folks at IJ, they are selective regarding which hill they are willing to die on (and I support that approach).
        IJ would need a sympathetic client who suffered greatly from an egregious application of the law, such as that woman whose kid borrowed her car to transport dope and had the car ‘taken’ as a result. IJ got it back.
        So absent that sort of client, you’ve got ‘standing’ issues and I’m happy IJ doesn’t blow my money on that sort of fantasy.

    2. Angel Raich’s lawyers should have brought that up, but they apparently didn’t. Would it have changed the outcome? We don’t know.

  8. How do we know they won’t just sell that marijuana and buy food?

    1. “President Duterte is all over the place. When he’s wrong he’s wrong but when he’s right he’s really right:”
      Right. Random shootings are the way to go.
      Your intelligence remains more than suspect.

      1. They’re not “random”. Duterte is calling for killing violent communist terrorists.If you RTFA he’s tried several times to make peace with them because they’re fellow Filipinos. He’s shown quite a bit of restraint to no avail.Some people just deserve killing. There’s no compromise.

        1. He should use drones, like a proper first world president. Machetes are so 1980’s!

  9. Start working at home with Google. It’s the most-financially rewarding I’ve ever done. On tuesday I got a gorgeous BMW after having earned $8699 this last month. I actually started five months/ago and practically straight away was bringin in at least $96, per-hour. visit this site right here….. http://www.mesalary.com

  10. Why do we care whether government workers get high before coming to work? Could they do worse? Maybe we’d get a kinder, gentler boot on our necks.

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