Reason Roundup

Can DHS Shoot Down Citizen Drones? House Votes Today: Reason Roundup

Plus: why Gary Johnson will be good for the Senate, "toxic culture" at the TSA, the dismissal of an anti-FOSTA lawsuit, and a new economic freedom index.

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Yulii Zozulia/Avalon.red/Newscom

A lot of legislative lunacy is happening in Congress week—and it's not getting enough media attention in the midst of the Brett Kavanaugh confirmation circus. Today the House of Representatives is scheduled to vote on a measure that would give the Department of Homeland Security power to shoot down citizen drones, plus a PATRIOT Act–parroting banking bill disguised as a measure to stop human traffickers (H.R. 6729).

Both of these terrible measures would increase the power of federal agents to terrorize and surveil innocent citizens without accountability and due process. Here's a more detailed look at the alleged anti-trafficking bill.

The drone power comes from a wider (and 1,200-page) Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) reauthorization bill. You can read more about its details here and here, but rest assured that it's bad news (no matter how many times DHS officials insist it's only about our safety). Provisions under a section titled "Preventing Emerging Threats" would "give the government virtually carte blanche to surveil, seize, or even shoot a drone out of the sky— whether owned by journalists or commercial entities—with no oversight or due process," said Neema Singh Guliani of the American Civil Liberties Union in a statement.

"They grant new powers to the Justice Department and the Department of Homeland Security to spy on Americans without a warrant," she added. "Congress should remove these provisions from the bill."

The House is also set to vote today or later this week on…

  • a bill that would promote more meddling in digital currencies (to stop "terrorism," obviously) and set a reward of up to $450,000 "to any person who provides information leading to the conviction of an individual involved with terrorsit use of digital currencies";
  • a bill that would increase scrutiny on financial institutions that do business with "state sponsors of terror";
  • a resolution "recognizing the important role of chefs in responding to natural disasters"; and
  • a resolution "recognizing that allowing illegal immigrants the right to vote devalues the franchise and diminishes the voting power of United States citizens."

Meanwhile, congressional committees are set to tackle a slew of weighty topics today, including U.S. strategy in Syria; fraud within the the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance (aka "food stamps") program; "First Amendment rights on campus"; an anti-SWATTING act; civil-rights abuses in China; "countering Iranian proxies in Iraq"; and "misconduct & retaliation within the TSA."

In addition, representatives from Homeland Security and the Department of Justice will testify about "federal efforts to stop human trafficking" and former Fox News personality Greta Van Susteren will testify about genocide against the Burmese Rohingya.

It's a weird day. Or maybe not. Yesterday, federal legislators tackled topics including the importance of "lumberjack sports," a "border tunnel task force," how "to expand and strengthen Federal sex offenses" (a perennial congressional favorite), how to set up an Amber Alert system for missing adults, regulatory standards for veterans' service dogs, thwarting Hizballah, quantum science, a bill called the "Hack Your State Department Act" that is not nearly as fun as it sounds, and musical copyright practices.

FREE MINDS

"A Senator Gary Johnson could be good not just for Libertarians, but for the Senate too," writes John Vaught LaBeaume, deputy communications director for the Libertarian presidential ticket in 2016, at The Hill. LaBeaume—who isn't affiliated with Johnson's current campaign for a seat in the U.S. Senate—suggests that having Johnson as a Libertarian Party candidate in the Senate

could serve up a welcome antidote to the polarized partisan atmosphere that's paralyzing this country. And it could chart a new, more effective, course for Libertarian-branded politics that could give voice to voters nationwide who don't "fit" comfortably—and aren't welcome by tribalized bases—into the current Democratic and Republican electoral coalitions.

Read the whole thing here.

FREE MARKETS

U.S. cracks top ten for economic freedom.

FOLLOW-UP

Kavanaugh tales continue ahead of Thursday testimony. The latest in the saga of is-our-Supreme-Court-nominee-a-sexual-predator? Four friends of his first accuser, Christine Blasey Ford, have come forward to "corroborate" her story (as USA Today put it), although none of the friends had heard the story until 2012.

In documents sent to the Senate Judiciary Committee and obtained by USA TODAY, Ford's attorneys present declarations from Ford's husband, Russell, and three friends who support the California college professor's accusation that Kavanaugh pinned her to a bed, groped her and attempted to pull off her clothes while both were high school students in 1982.

Republicans in Congress have announced that prosecutor Rachel Mitchell, who is on leave from the Maricopa County Attorney's Office in Arizona, will be the one to question Ford during Thursday's scheduled testimony.

QUICK HITS

  • A new report explores the "toxic culture" and "unchecked misconduct" within the federal Transportation Security Administration (TSA). Since at least 2015, "TSA leadership inappropriately used involuntary directed reassignments to retaliate against disfavored employees and whistleblowers, among other tactics," as well as "obstructed various investigations" which might have exposed them.
  • A federal court has dismissed a lawsuit brought by several nonprofit organizations against FOSTA.
  • Bill Cosby was sentenced to 3 to 10 years in prison on sexual assault charges.
  • Facing sex crime charges, Cody Wilson has resigned as chief executive officer of the 3D-printed gun design company Defense Distributed.
  • "The media can't justify Botham Jean's killing" by his police officer neighbor. "But they're trying," explains Hanif Abdurraqib at BuzzFeed.
  • The U.S. divorce rate fell 18 percent between 2008 and 2016, according to a new study out of the University of Maryland. Lead researcher Philip Cohen found that "the divorce rate's decline isn't a reflection of a decline in marriages," notes Bloomberg. "Rather, it's evidence that marriages today have a greater chance of lasting than marriages did ten years ago." Bloomberg points out that "young people get the credit for fewer divorces," since the divorce rate among boomers has remained higher than among other generational cohorts.

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125 responses to “Can DHS Shoot Down Citizen Drones? House Votes Today: Reason Roundup

  1. BREAKING: For the first time in almost a decade, the United States ranks within the top ten economically freest countries! https://t.co/3sJtwPLAvi pic.twitter.com/TWcMEfbnwY
    ? Cato Institute (@CatoInstitute) September 25, 2018

    WE’RE NUMBER ONE! WE’RE NUMBER ONE!

    1. Did we rise or did others fall?

      1. Looks like we rose a little. Might be both us rising a little and others falling.

        1. Also, the 2018 report looks like it covers 2016.

          1. Wait, so we can’t credit Trump???

            1. Unless I’m misreading it. Which I could cause I just glanced at the numbers and not the process used.

              1. It is worth noting that the United States returned to the top 10 in 2016 after an absence of several years.

                Nope, you’re right.

                1. Here’s the Heritage Foundations Index if you want it. Not quite as good on this one, but we are slightly up year over year on that, and that does seem to include 2017/2018.

                  1. There’s also the World Bank’s ease of doing business index, and the Fraser Institute’s global economic freedom rankings, both of which are higher on the US than Heritage.

                    Heritage has a severe bug up its butt about the size of the government, though its effects (per Heritage’s own rankings and those of others) are relatively benign. That 75% of our government’s spending is devoted to wealth transfers and defense might have something to do with that disparity.

                    1. If you have any others, throw them over here. Always interested in more data.

      2. It’s all relative. If you don’t like it, go to Russia.

    2. Hello.

      “Bill Cosby was sentenced to 3 to 10 years in prison”

      Well? Which is it?

      /spins Fat Albert record.

      1. Rufus, you’re like a level 0 NPC.

        No class

        1. NPC?

          1. “Non Player Character”. A.K.A. The cannon fodder that the Game Master populates the towns and castles with.

        2. like school on Saturday no class.

  2. A federal court has dismissed a lawsuit brought by several nonprofit organizations against FOSTA.

    What’s speech rights when women are being trafficked???

  3. A Senator Gary Johnson could be good not just for Libertarians, but for the Senate too…

    And a boon to the Nazi cake industry.

    1. I could use it. As much as I hate to say to say it, my Arbeit Macht Frosting cakes aren’t doing as well as I’d hope.

      1. You got me hungry for brownie shirts.

        1. I didn’t see that “r” at first.

  4. “recognizing the important role of chefs in responding to natural disasters”

    Does this include cooking foi gras in the wake of an earthquake in San Francisco, or is that still illegal?

    1. What’s good for the goose is good for the gander.

    2. It naturally includes refusing to do wedding cakes in response to potentially disastrous couplings.

  5. Four friends of his first accuser, Christine Blasey Ford, have come forward to “corroborate” her story…

    She was apparently not very good at not telling anyone.

    1. #UsToo

    2. Okay, I’ll admit it. Bart Kavanaugh held me down and made tender love to my butt. It was so tender that since then no other lovers have stacked up, leaving me eternally dissatisfied with my relationships.

      1. ‘Bout time we got some real evidence in this claim.

    3. Nah. She didnt tell them until 2012 either.

      I dont think Reason understands corroboration well.

  6. Republicans in Congress have announced that prosecutor Rachel Mitchell, who is on leave from the Maricopa County Attorney’s Office in Arizona, will be the one to question Ford during Thursday’s scheduled testimony.

    Makes sense as she would be very dismissive of charges against law enforcement officials.

  7. Since at least 2015, “TSA leadership inappropriately used involuntary directed reassignments to retaliate against disfavored employees and whistleblowers, among other tactics,” as well as “obstructed various investigations” which might have exposed them.

    Those they didn’t like weren’t allowed to man the naked scanners or access the confiscated iPads room.

  8. Can DHS Shoot Down Citizen Drones? House Votes Today:

    Amendment V: No person shall be held to answer for a capital, or otherwise infamous crime, unless on a presentment or indictment of a grand jury, except in cases arising in the land or naval forces, or in the militia, when in actual service in time of war or public danger; nor shall any person be subject for the same offense to be twice put in jeopardy of life or limb; nor shall be compelled in any criminal case to be a witness against himself, nor be deprived of life, liberty, or property, without due process of law; nor shall private property be taken for public use, without just compensation.

    If you shoot it down, you need to provide just compensation.

    1. If money can be guilty of a crime, drones can be confiscated, whole or in pieces.

  9. …a PATRIOT Act?parroting banking bill disguised as a measure to stop human traffickers (H.R. 6729).

    They’ve harnessed the power of the trafficking panic, a power that the clown panic could never live up to. (Even though clowns are real.)

    1. I once saw a clown car… in traffic…

      Harrowing.

  10. Beto O’Rourke tried to flee DWI scene

    Cruz gets heckled into leaving restaurant. Beto gets heckled into leaving DWI scene.

    1. Well, if he was as drunk as the WAPO Fact Checker reports, he probably raped some poor woman before getting into the accident, because drinking always leads to rape, doesn’t it?

      1. All men are rapists, with or without alcohol, silly rabbit.

      2. If he didn’t get in a drunken three-way with groupies during his punk band days, it certainly would make him the lamest rocker ever.

  11. Bloomberg points out that “young people get the credit for fewer divorces,” since the divorce rate among boomers has remained higher than among other generational cohorts.

    I give it six months.

    1. YOU monster!

    2. Too lazy to get divorced.

      1. Who gets the PS4 and smart-tv?

        1. They belong to Mom and Dad.

  12. A federal court has dismissed a lawsuit brought by several nonprofit organizations against FOSTA.

    The Court dismissed the lawsuit for lack of Plaintiff standing.

    Funny since prostitutes are always standing around.

  13. a resolution “recognizing the important role of chefs in responding to natural disasters”; and
    a resolution “recognizing that allowing illegal immigrants the right to vote devalues the franchise and diminishes the voting power of United States citizens.”

    If only they spent all their time passing resolutions.

    1. That second one seems like it should be pretty damn obvious.

  14. Slate: Kavanaugh’s drinking needs investigating

    He might as well withdraw his nomination. The progressive / libertarian alliance has shown the country what a drunken monster he is, and he now has zero chance of getting confirmed.

    Thanks to the efforts of patriots like Senator Feinstein, #TheResistance just claimed its biggest victory yet. And November’s #BlueWave will be even sweeter.

    1. I’m curious what’s your rationalization for Feinstein withholding information for many months?

      1. In politics and comedy, timing is everything.

        1. I’m curious to hear what fun spin OBL puts on it

      2. Feinstein found herself in an impossible position ? continue to conceal a #MeToo bombshell and hope Kavanaugh’s other scandals (baseball ticket debt, snubbed handshakes, white power gestures) would be enough to defeat his nomination, or publicize the info and risk re-traumatizing Dr. Ford so Kavanaugh would be guaranteed never to become a Supreme Court justice. It was undoubtedly an excruciating decision for her to make, and I’m sure she lost many nights of sleep wondering how to proceed, but in the end I think she did the right thing.

        #LibertariansForFeinstein

        1. Nicely done. A-

    2. Only if they investigate Beto O’Rourke’s as well.

    3. Of course. We need to be sure people in positions of power know what to drink with fish and what with red meat.

  15. “They grant new powers to the Justice Department and the Department of Homeland Security to spy on Americans without a warrant,” [Neema Singh Guliani of the American Civil Liberties Union] added. “Congress should remove these provisions from the bill.”

    Unless of course it was because those Americans were exploiting the Second Amendment loophole.

  16. Countering Iranian proxies in Iraq? Its pretty simple… give aid to Sunni terrorists, and once they become too powerful, give weapons to the Kurds and turn a blind eye to Shi’a militias when they retaliate. Repeat cycle in 10 years when the Iranian proxies rise again.

  17. NBCnews- US ships denied port of call in Hong Kong by Commies

    Its almost like simple trade negotiations between two nations has the Communist nation of China very upset so they are escalating their anger to preventing normal friendly ship visits.

    1. Don’t worry. Trade wars are easy to win.

      1. The USA has not won its trade war for over 50 years.

        1. So your official stance now is, “We’ve always been at trade war with East Asia”?

          1. I’m beginning to think OBL has nailed it. LC might have been the first true parody account.

            1. So The USA was not in a trade war with Japan in the 1950’s and 60’s?
              The USA was not in a trade war with the USSR from 1950’s to 1989?
              The USA was not in a trade war with Communist China from 1950 to 1970s?
              The USA was not in a trade war with OPEC in the 1970’s?
              The USA was not in a trade war with Japan during the 1980’s and 90’s?
              The USA was not in a trade war with China since the 1970’s?
              ….
              History US trade wars

              Some of you people need to brush up on history.

            2. Leo thinks OBL is NOT a parody account and that you all you need to hear.

          2. Haven’t we though?

          3. We have been in a trade war since shortly after WWII.

            1. if it isn’t over after 70 years is it a war or is it just what is?

              1. I would agree. Calling managed trade fluctuations a ‘trade war’ has always seemed ridiculous to me.

                I just love to throw it back in the faces of those that think a ‘trade war’ hasn’t happened until Trump.

  18. Ugh, this is so predictable. Conservatives are pouncing on an out-of-context, decades old clip of Joe Biden explaining the FBI’s role in investigating Supreme Court nominees. In college I learned this is what’s called a “false equivalence.” Dr. Ford passed a lie detector test and has asked for an FBI investigation, so that’s what should happen. Doesn’t matter what Biden said during the Thomas hearings.

    1. C for no mention of whataboutism.

    2. +1 for “In college I learned”

  19. Yesterday, federal legislators tackled topics including the importance of “lumberjack sports,”

    Did they all sing “I’m a lumberjack and I’m okay”?

  20. Meant to Keep Malaria Out, Mosquito Nets Are Used to Haul Fish In
    Across Africa, from the mud flats of Nigeria to the coral reefs off Mozambique, mosquito-net fishing is a growing problem, an unintended consequence of one of the biggest and most celebrated public health campaigns in recent years.

    The nets have helped save millions of lives, but scientists worry about the collateral damage: Africa’s fish.

    Part of the concern is the scale. Mosquito nets are now a billion-dollar industry, with hundreds of millions of insecticide-treated nets passed out in recent years, and many more on their way.

    They arrive by the truckload in poor, waterside communities where people have been trying to scrape by with substandard fishing gear for as long as anyone can remember. All of a sudden, there are light, soft, surprisingly strong nets ? for free. Many people said it would be foolish not to use them for fishing.

    1. Is the stance of the article that this is a bad thing?

      1. Probably is bad because for some stupid reason the nets are soaked in insecticide, so that might be bad for fish.

        1. My guess would actually be that nets which are small enough to keep mosquitoes out catch all the fish, no matter what size they are, leading to sustainability problems.

    2. This is why good intentions are not always the solution.

      These Africans would rather use mosquito nets to fish than to prevent mosquito borne illness.

      They would rather die by malaria than die by starvation.

      1. These Africans would rather use mosquito nets to fish than to prevent mosquito borne illness.

        These may not be mutually exclusive.

        1. Provide them MORE nets to use for fishing AND protect sleeping areas?

          1. There was a story from San Diego years ago of homeless people throwing shopping carts in a salmon stream in order to catch fresh salmon. DIY fish weirs!

            1. the hungry will always find a way. if you can’t eat what good is it to protect oneself from mosquitoes

          2. Not necessarily a terrible idea for the mosquito net people. Provide both the mosquito nets and appropriately woven fishing nets. I mean, if they’re willing to donate money to provide the mosquito nets in the first place, they might be willing to make sure the Africans don’t starve themselves out in five years by catching all the baby fishes, too.

  21. I once felt up a girl during ‘Ripples’ at a high school dance.

    Am I in trouble?

    1. So much trouble, you can’t even know for another 20 years.

    2. get out of jail card for Genesis tip.

    1. +1

  22. “Four friends of his first accuser, Christine Blasey Ford, have come forward to “corroborate” her story (as USA Today put it), although none of the friends had heard the story until 2012.”

    Ben Bradlee, as Bernstein and Woodward’s editor at the Washington Post, is famous for supposedly having referred to Nixon officials response to Watergate stories as a “non-denial denial”. I guess this is what he might have called a “non-corroboration corroboration”?

    Her friends confirmed that she remembered what she says she remembered 30 years after the fact?

    I can go on the record corroborating the fact that the she says she remembers something from 35 years ago, too? The question is if anyone can corroborate the story–35 years ago. This is getting ridiculous, and the senate would be right to go ahead with a vote on Friday.

    Congratulations to senate Democrats for making someone like me, who was on the fence over Kavanaugh on Fourth Amendment concerns, become an ardent defender of Kavanaugh–not because I give a hoot about him personally. Only because it now seems to be about things like due process and whether anyone should be disqualified from anything on the basis of uncorroborated accusations–simply because of the nature of the accusations themselves.

  23. From day one of this saga, I’ve been asking the same question, and I still haven’t seen anyone attempt to answer it.

    Even if the allegations were true, why is it acceptable to disqualify people from public office based on something they did 35 years before, when they were minors?

    I’ve seen Reason staff write that suggesting that the allegations are unimportant even if they’re true makes me awful, but I haven’t seen any defense of the idea that what we do as minors should disqualify us from office 35 years later.

    Does telling an ethnic joke as a minor 35 years ago disqualify from public office?

    Does simply laughing at an ethnic joke that someone else told–35 years ago–disqualify someone from public office?

    Does calling some friend on the basketball a “fag” in the locker room back in high school disqualify someone from public office 35 years after the fact?

    Anybody who believes that people should be disqualified from public office based on having done any of these things 35 years before when they were minors, please explain your reasoning–if you have any.

    I’ve been to Mosque. I’ve talked to Fundamentalist Muslims. Fundamentalist Muslims don’t even count the sins of children.

    1. None of the sins you mentioned contained the horrible and degrading experience of anything to do with, dare I say it, sex.

      1. Neither does the Kavanaugh allegation.

      2. I suspect racism may be even worse than sexism in a lot of people’s minds.

        Sexism, racism, homophobia, these are all unforgivable sins to the new prudes.

        Being accused of being any of those things is as bad or worse than being accused of being a communist was during the Red Scare.

        The same kind of blackballing is going on in Hollywood for being accused of these unforgivable sins.

        They’re apparently disqualifying people from public office based on mere accusations of these sins, too.

    2. The ploy to shock Kavanaugh into withdrawing his name for consideration with some 35 year old unsupported accusation didn’t work.

      The Left hoped it would work.

      The Left still publicly says that Doug Jones won the Alabama Senate seat because of some Democrat popularity. Roy Moore lost the Alabama Senate seat.

      The Lefties hoped it would work again here with Kavanaugh.

    3. Even if the allegations were true, why is it acceptable to disqualify people from public office based on something they did 35 years before, when they were minors?

      Because if they are true, he’s been lying about them as a middle-aged man.

      1. So it isn’t based on what he did before, you just want to show that he’s dishonest?

        Do you have any other indications of his dishonesty? That would be my next question.

        In the meantime, that reasoning isn’t a justification for disqualifying him from office based on what he did as a minor 35 years ago. That’s a justification for disqualifying him based on what he’s doing now.

        And that doesn’t address what appears to be the underlying assumption people are drilling for here. It seems to have something to do with the idea that if he was a sexist 35 years ago as a minor, then he shoudln’t be allowed on the court for fear that he doesn’t take women’s rights into consideration. IF IF IF that’s what people are assuming, they need to justify that assumption–because it’s got some gaping holes in it.

        If it’s all about Kavanaugh being dishonest, then they should be able to find more examples from recent history.

        Again, to paraphrase Norm McDonald on the Cosby case, no, the worst thing about what Cosby did wasn’t the hypocrisy. It was the rape. Then there was the drugging. Then there was the scheming. The hypocrisy was somewhere four pages down the list of the worst thing about what Cosby did. In fact, being a hypocrite about raping someone isn’t a bad thing at all. Would it be better if he’d bragged about being a rapist? Would you have said, “Well, at least he isn’t a hypocrite”?

        1. So, excuse me, but, no, I don’t believe that lying about having committed sexual assault is the part that disqualifies people from public office.

        2. The Lefties want another Progressive on the SCOTUS [period]

          Anything less than that will garner attack after attack after attack.

          Lefties know that RBG will die while Trump is president and she will be replaced by Trump.

          They know which way the wind is blowing and it scares the shit out them.

      2. The claim is that everyone was blackout drunk.

    4. Anybody who believes that people should be disqualified from public office based on having done any of these things 35 years before when they were minors, please explain your reasoning–if you have any.

      Anybody who looks at this with even a hint of objectivity knows the reasoning is all political.

      1. Not only that but what people call minor sexual assault and sexual harassment now were not even really that big of a deal 35 years ago.

        Tailhook didnt even happen until the 1990s.

        Men were expected to be sexually aggressive. Rape has been taboo for men for a very long time.

    5. FWIW, my wife doesn’t think the allegations are disqualifying, even if true.

      But then again, she agreed to marry me, so she has low standards.

    6. Well, for one thing, irrespective on the question, none of the things you mentioned are anywhere near as bad as supposed attempted sexual assault / rape / murder / whatever Kavanaugh is accused of today.

      So declaring that there is a difference between what you mentioned, and what Kavanaugh is accused of, isn’t completely unreasonable.

      I certainly think there’s a difference between someone who tells even a truly vicious ethnic joke, and someone who attempts to commit violent assault.

      I guess the question is whether one thinks that an attempted violent assault is indicative of a permanent character flaw or not. I’m not sure I have an answer for my part.

  24. Republicans in Congress have announced that prosecutor Rachel Mitchell, who is on leave from the Maricopa County Attorney’s Office in Arizona, will be the one to question Ford during Thursday’s scheduled testimony.

    I’m still 99% certain she’s not even going to show up. I think she’s a complete lunatic, but she’s smart enough to not be questioned under oath anywhere at any time, because she’s smart enough to know that perjury is a felony. Her democratic party friends on the senate judiciary committee have been trying like hell to contact her for the last two days and she refuses to even respond to them.

    I can’t wait to see how the Professional Fake Libertarians of Reason and all their butt-buddies in the JournoList will manage to spin that if it turns out that I’m right!

    1. Nobody’s going to prosecute her for perjury. No one can prove beyond a reasonable doubt that she’s lying. And she wouldn’t have made a spectacle of herself if she didn’t want to be a spectacle.

      We won’t know until we know, but my bet it is that she doesn’t let this crisis go to waste. She can be a hero–just for one day.

      1. I think she’s earned her place regardless of the outcome. She’ll get her reward regardless, either as a brave woman who saved the country from a scoundrel, or a poor martyr who represents another notch in the belt of the patriarchy.

        1. Pretty sad that these are the only life aspirations left for wine moms these days.

          1. To be fair, they set up a generation (millennials) to fail.

        2. She’ll absolutely do the Oprah, Ellen, View circuit, being held up as a model of a strong, independent woman (hear her roar!).

      2. If she doesn’t show up to testify the left will excuse her act because she new she wouldn’t get a fair hearing from the commitie so why make her relive the trauma all over again for no real gain against the evil GOP

    2. If she doesn’t show up it’ll be because the Republicans intimidated her so much that she’s been emotionally scarred by the whole situation.

  25. NYT- Plot to subvert election

    Here is the Lefty fever dream so far….

  26. Salesforce’s annual soiree is closing much of downtown SF this week, and the CEO Benioff is the darling of SF lefties, except when Trump is president; seems the ICE uses Salesforce apps and there were protesters.
    So:
    “The only way is ethics as Salesforce opens Office of Ethical and Humane Use of Technology”
    http://www.moneyhealthfinance.com/the-only
    -way-is-ethics-as-salesforce-opens-office-of
    -ethical-and-humane-use-of-technology/

    He’s not about to pass up good money, but he’ll open an office with a long name, stick someone who was gonna get fired in it, and tell the reporters to check with him/her.

  27. as long as we’re on equal footing about drones being shot out of the sky I’m in.

    1. We are.

      I have a weapon that shoots a net 200 feet. They will become my drone!

      1. sweet. was picturing dancing around smoldering ruins and putting it on youtube like Iranians.

        1. Haha. I might just do that to fuck with them.

  28. Do we really think that the Senate isn’t full of drunk frat boys who groped women (or men) in college?

    I wasn’t even in a frat and I am pretty sure I was drunk most of the time and occasionally someone saw me nekkid.

    This may be an example where the accusation hits too close to home for the people doing the judging.

  29. Only three or four times in college did I wake up in an entirely strange place with no idea of how I got there. Once was a bathtub in a strange house full of sleeping people none of whom I recognized. Another time was under a picnic table at a highway rest stop in another state. I vaguely remembered being at a kegger and someone said, “Hey, we can be in Reno before sunrise!”

    1. Its simply counter to the American notion of fairplay to change the rules and then attack people for what they did when their behavior was normal.

      Its why the US Constitution has a prohibition against ex post facto laws.

    2. This by definition makes you guilty of being a gang rapist, at least according to the left-wing scum in the democratic party / JournoList complex.

  30. Bill Cosby was sentenced to 3 to 10 years in prison on sexual assault charges.

    Didn’t Shkreli get 7 years for doubling his investors’ money without permission? Damn, guess he should have raped multiple women over a few decades.

  31. Any citizen of this country should be allowed t shoot down any unidentified or unwanted or for any other than law enforcement purposes any drone or airplane illegally or frivolously flying over private property for the purpose of invading that private party and activities on that property.

  32. When people are asked to use gut instinct to stop real but rare horrors, relying on racial stereotypes and other biases tends to rule.

    Is that why the cops pulled a gun on my friend the day I moved him and his babby mamma into my town. It’s strange how one of the other regulars at the Wellness Center died of a drug overdoes latter that night in the Wellness Center bathroom.

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