Mexico

Mexico's 'Silicon Valley' Offers Different Image for Americans

You don't have to worry about the wall when you work in the cloud.

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GUADALAJARA, Jalisco—Perhaps I shouldn't have referred to Mexico's second-largest city, Guadalajara, as a south-of-the-border version of Silicon Valley.

J.P. Lopez, who heads business development for a nonprofit called Ijalti that promotes the state of Jalisco's high-tech business "clusters," was shaking his head when the words spilled out of my mouth. "We're a unique hub" with its "own DNA," he objected. The city's technology boom has been decades in the making, after all, and has grown organically. It's certainly not a copy of anything.

I get the point, but still slapped "Mexico's Silicon Valley" in the headline for a decidedly north-of-the-border reason. In the age of Donald Trump—and what news isn't about Trump these days?—it's useful to discuss our southern neighbor without referring to drug cartels, crime and illegal immigration. Even Americans' positive views of Mexico are limited, and are epitomized by a T-shirt sold in a tourist shop in beachfront Puerto Vallarta that welcomes Americans to "the fun side of the wall."

Mexico beach resorts certainly are entertaining, but there's more to the country than these things. That's why I took the three-hour flight south, where I was the guest of an Austin-based software-development company called iTexico. The firm specializes in "nearshoring" for U.S. companies, which is an alternative to "offshoring" operations in places such as India or China.

A few years ago, I developed a start-up website but couldn't afford a local developer. I contracted with a company in India, but learned about the difficulties of that approach. It's 8:32 a.m. in Sacramento now, but 9:02 p.m. in Bangalore. You work on the site, come up with a question and email it to India, but the developer is asleep. When he wakes up, he answers the question and emails it back — but you're asleep. It can take weeks to resolve simple matters. And then there are language and cultural barriers that complicate the process.

During my stay in Mexico, I worked just as if I were at home. Jalisco is in central time. The software-development team spoke perfect English. It's easy to fly to Texas to meet with clients. One of my Mexican hosts attended college in Boise, Idaho. And Americans and Mexicans are far more similar culturally than our president would have us believe. It's not much different than working with a company in the Midwest or the South.

Aren't nearshoring firms stealing American jobs? That's an inevitable question given the fixations of the current administration.

"Right now in the U.S. there is a deficit of 1-million-plus technology jobs," said iTexico CEO Anurag Kumar. "We're not lifting and shifting anything from the United States to Guadalajara. We're helping companies in the U.S. by providing talent that they don't have here. … We're helping U.S. companies build jobs faster." There are cost savings, but those are secondary, he added.

Many Americans want to have it both ways. They complain when U.S. companies create jobs in other countries, then complain also when people from those other countries immigrate to the United States to get meaningful work. I'm not concerned about immigration, but those who are ought to see the value of developing solid industries in Mexico so that industrious people don't need to wait in immigration lines (or sneak across the border) to come here.

The free market is the best way to increase prosperity for everyone. Lower-cost alternatives reduce wages in certain industries because of the resulting competition. But it's not a zero-sum game. Because I was able to outsource that website mentioned above, I was able to cost-effectively start a project. Low-cost labor allows people with new ideas to start businesses, and such enterprises create more jobs in the long run. That's how free economies work.

You can't write about Mexico without addressing crime. There's no sugarcoating the problems the country has with drug-related murders. But as I asked a friend who expressed fear about traveling to Mexico, "Would you walk around south Chicago or north Philadelphia at midnight?" It's all about perspective. A recent study by United Healthcare Global evaluated security threats and crime rates on a one (lowest) to five (highest) basis. Guadalajara scored three on both, which is the same as San Francisco, worse than Las Vegas and better than Philadelphia and Atlanta.

Kumar said he isn't worried about the wall because he works in the cloud. Indeed, people in Jalisco are careful about what they say about U.S. policy, but there's no doubt Trump's actions are reason for concern. His incendiary rhetoric also is sparking a populist national political backlash in Mexico, which could lead to myriad problems on both sides of the border.

Despite short-term political uncertainties, there's no question Guadalajara is in the tech business for the long haul. For many years, companies such as Motorola, Dell, Hewlett-Packard and IBM have operated in the city. The Universidad de Guadalajara has been a magnet for engineering and technology students. Although I oppose such things, the state and city governments have offered subsidies. With its treasure trove of historical neighborhoods and hip nightlife, Guadalajara is a magnet for young IT types from across the country.

It's definitely one of a kind, so it's easy to understand those who bristle at news stories making the Silicon Valley comparison. But the comparison is an improvement from the usual American discussions of Mexico. It's a reminder that Americans need to develop a more thoughtful and nuanced understanding about the complexities of their friendly southern neighbor — and get beyond the ugly rhetoric and stories about cartels.

This column first appeared in the Orange County Register.

Steven Greenhut is Western region director for the R Street Institute. He was a Register editorial writer from 1998-2009. Write to him at sgreenhut@rstreet.org.

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  1. “Many Americans want to have it both ways. They complain when U.S. companies create jobs in other countries, then complain also when people from those other countries immigrate to the United States to get meaningful work.”

    Sometimes it sounds like libertarians are really just a bunch of autists who can’t understand human emotions. That complaint isn’t Americans being hypocritical, it’s human beings wanting to see their tribe/people be successful.

    Whens the last time we’ve seen articles railing against the welfare state? Because until you abolish that, importing a bunch of poor people will be a net liberty negative.

    Known consequences of an action are not accidental. You know that bringing in poor voters will result in more people voting for big government. It’s baffling as to why you advocate for such an action.

    Assuming that you fully understand the trade-offs, I have to ask how you benefit from such a thing. You and your children will be poorer and less free.

      1. Even that article isn’t calling for an end to the welfare state, it is calling for one that covers all Americans regardless of age. But only if they’re “poor”

        1. National defense spending is welfare spending. They’re presumably building all those weapons and stuff to protect your welfare. Do we end that welfare program too?

          1. The issue you want to talk around is that even if you zero out defense spending America still goes broke, but hey keep harping on the far lesser expenditure as if that’s meaningful. It definitely doesn’t make you look like an apologist.

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          2. Get lit|3.30.18 @ 9:08AM|#
            “National defense spending is welfare spending. They’re presumably building all those weapons and stuff to protect your welfare. Do we end that welfare program too?”

            You’re a fucking ignoramus. Get lost.

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            2. Why? Do you work for one of the death merchants? Own stock?

              Other than obscenities, do you have anything of actual value to contribute to the debate? Counter-arguments to refute the basic premise?

              If not, than you are simply wasting space and time. Not to mention destroying your own credibility, if you ever had any.

          3. They’re building “all those weapons and stuff” to protect the “welfare” (profits) of the defense contractors who own them and our government. The only protection ordinary people need are from the whores in D.C. and the crony capitalists (as opposed to free-market capitalists) who are systematically raping and looting this country.

      2. The article starts from the wrong premise:

        What’s more, they provide benefits for senior Americans generally, without regard to need. It’s time to change the way we think about these programs.

        In fact, wealthier Americans already get a very poor return on investment from Social Security; it is already a means tested program. The reason it isn’t more directly means-tested is because that would require assessing the actual wealth of Americans for means testing, an intrusive procedure and a dangerous precedent. On top of that, it would discourage people from accumulating wealth.

        The solution to all of this is actually not that hard. Social Security needs to become an actual retirement program with rational, market-based returns, instead of a redistributive scheme. And welfare needs to be cut back and become minimal support for people who are demonstrably indigent, and/or be replaced by minimal, undesirable government issued in-kind contributions (food boxes, asylums, public clinics, etc.).

        1. What about cutting back on corporate welfare – a MUCH bigger chunk of change?

          1. What about cutting back on corporate welfare – a MUCH bigger chunk of change?

            Social Security, Medicare/Medicaid, Veterans benefits, housing, and education, all clearly social spending, make up about 70% of the federal budget. So, corporate welfare cannot be a “much bigger chunk of change”. In fact, actual, simple corporate welfare is probably only a few percent of the budget, compared to those 70% for social spending.

    1. It’s interesting – Reason would, one presumes, speak from an individualist rather than collectivist perspective. Yet Greenhut’s fundamental approach is collectivist here.
      “And Americans and Mexicans are far more similar culturally than our president would have us believe.”
      I wonder what our president would supposedly have us believe about Mexicans? I know of many references to Mexico – an entity defined as a nation state with defined borders and a governmental structure – but I am unaware of anything he’s said about Mexicans. He has given a general characterization of many illegal immigrants from Mexico, but even their he specified the difference between those he characterized and Mexicans in general. So even as Trump spoke from a collective framework, he still showed more recognition for individual variability of people than Greenhut has.
      Both Trump and Greenhut present accurate information as regards US-Mexico relations, but only Greenhut insists on conflating people with the state/government and holding them as the same.
      That’s how you end up in hysterical tantrums about “racism” when the discussion is about policy. It’s fine to personify states but inappropriate to extend that personification to the people who inhabit those states, as Greenhut does here.

      1. Notice when Trump speaks generally about foreigners, he doesn’t actually talk about people – he addresses a personified entity.
        “Mexico is taking advantage,” or “China is screwing us.” Mexico and China, not Mexican and Chinese. There is a significant difference. It’s odd that so many miss this, as I’ve never heard anyone imply that “make America great again,” is the same as “make Americans great again.” Mexico, China, and America are indeed composed of people whose actions determine the subjects behavior, but are not themselves not people – just personified.

        Personally, I believe governments should prioritize its constituents over those of other governments. Call me crazy.
        Mexico (rather than Mexicans) is both a partner and competitor with the US (rather than Americans). Americans (rather than the US) are both neighbors and strangers to Mexicans (rather than Mexico). These are separate issues. Americans can certainly care about Mexicans, but the only sense in which the US should concern itself with Mexicans is how those Mexicans affect the US and Americans. The same holds for Mexico in regards to Americans.

        1. Greenhut implies that America is synonymous with American and Mexico with Mexican, but this is not so. Thus, the entire basis for this article is that misunderstanding. Instead of calling out and clarifying perspectives, he takes a reactionary approach. He assumes that an approach some take toward policy (the wall, immigration and trade regs) and their common characterization of Mexico is identical to a judgement and emotions about Mexicans. This is a common fallacy found in progressivism, which values the abstract over the concrete/manifest. Such a linguistically and conceptually indiscriminate, perhaps to the point of ignorant, perspective creates problems because discussion becomes personalized, hence overly emotional, unfocused, and mis-prioritized.

          I think we all know that most Mexicans are normal, civilized people much like ourselves. There aren’t running gun battles on every street corner (yet a lot of people are murdered). Greenhut seems to think that we need to be told this, as only his enlightened experience can correct everybody else’s thinking. He believes that characterization of Mexico means the same thing as saying Mexicans have that character.

          Well, Greenhut can GFH and his fallacious paradigm.

        2. Notice when Trump speaks generally about foreigners, he doesn’t actually talk about people – he addresses a personified entity. “Mexico is taking advantage,” or “China is screwing us.” Mexico and China, not Mexican and Chinese. There is a significant difference.

          Well, yes. “The Chinese” refers to the people living in China; “China” refers to the Chinese government. It’s the Chinese government that’s screwing us; the Chinese government is also screwing the Chinese people. Most people understand this, don’t they?

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      2. “And Americans and Mexicans are far more similar culturally than our president would have us believe.”

        Not by voting patterns

      3. Trump has very specifically referred to Mexicans as rapists and drug-dealers. That is how Mexicans are portrayed on Breitbart daily. No mention of the Mexican state, ever.

    2. What tribe? You mean all those assholes?

    3. It’s too bad libertarians don’t hate the state as much they hate the nation. They might actually be useful for something besides promoting a freak show.

    4. “Many Americans want to have it both ways. They complain when U.S. companies create jobs in other countries, then complain also when people from those other countries immigrate to the United States to get meaningful work.”

      Americans think that US government policy should benefit Americans
      Bloody peasants

  2. In the age of Donald Trump?and what news isn’t about Trump these days?

    There is a tremendous amount not about him. Your glib joke only feeds the hubris of it all.

    1. “Life discovered inside the clouds on Uranus”.

      Even THAT news is ESPECIALLY about The Donald!

    2. The hubris of whom?

      Trump?

      Those who can’t stop talking about him because they feel he committed regicide?

      His fan base?

  3. Why would anyone call it ‘a Mexican version of Silicone Valley’?

    It’s not.

    That’s why I took the three-hour flight south, where I was the guest of an Austin-based software-development company called iTexico. The firm specializes in “nearshoring” for U.S. companies

    It’s the American version of Silicone Valley grafted into Mexico by Americans. Sort of. Enough so investors feel comfortably Potemkinized.

    It’s Americans taking advantage of Mexico’s laxer labor laws.

    Like always.

    1. Ya know, the one reason I’ve been almost okay with Mexico stealin’ err jerbs!!! Is because it encourages them to stay there. I’m part Mexican myself, and I don’t HATE Mexicans… I just don’t want the USA to become Mexico, like my home state of California basically has.

      If we’re going to try to scrounge up cheap labor, Mexico is probably at the top of my list of places I would prefer it to be if it can’t be done in the USA.


    2. It’s Americans taking advantage of Mexico’s laxer labor laws.

      Like always.

      A very valid point. American’s have insulated their labor to the point where it’s non-competitive in a lot of area’s and instead of reforming our own insane labor laws we find it easier to just take advantage of other countries labor while keeping our own internal workforce on welfare. Even up until the point of allowing them to become black market labor inside our own borders in violation of our own labor laws.

      It’s enough to make one wonder how long that can really last, but no one seems to give a shit so I wager ‘until the collapse’ is how long it’ll go on for.

    3. Mexican voters could change their prohibition laws to resemble the decriminalization Portugal has has enjoyed for 17 years. Americans just might try fleeing there like so many East Germans.

      1. Yeeeaaah. Nobody will move to Mexico for from America, for almost any reason. It’s a shithole. Some might bail to Canada if they ever got their shit together though!

        1. Nobody will move to Mexico for from America, for almost any reason.

          That’s not right. There are plenty of people from the U.S. and Canada who retire in Mexico. Plenty of Mexican-Americans who were born or have lived in the U.S. also choose to go back and live in Mexico. I myself lived and worked in Mexico for several years and it was fine. I have several American and British friends from that time who are still living in Mexico. Mexico has definitely got its problems but there’s plenty of Mexico that’s not a shithole. If anything we can just agree to disagree.

          1. Well obviously I don’t mean NOBODY. My step grandma retired to Mexico, and had lived there and in parts of central America off and on throughout her life. She just likes the culture or something. And some people are into that. But by and large, Americans won’t be “fleeing there” in mass. A separate asteroid would have to hit every single one of the 200 largest cities in the USA for the quality of life to become so bad Mexico would be better to large swaths of the US population.

            I’m not trying to knock Mexico TOO bad. We Americans have a habit of doing that, forgetting that Mexico is actually one of the wealthiest countries in the world by global standards! It’s totally not comparable to the USA, but almost nowhere really is (even most of Europe is leaps and bounds poorer), so that’s kind of an unfair bar there.

        2. Under the Reagan era immigration rules, many Mexicans moved back on a regular basis. When their freedom of movement is curtailed, they stay in the US.

    4. “It’s the American version of Silicone Valley grafted into Mexico by Americans. Sort of. Enough so investors feel comfortably Potemkinized.”

      I’ve wondered if Native American reservations could bring in foreigners to be work hubs for US firms.

  4. “Many Americans want to have it both ways. They complain when U.S. companies create jobs in other countries, then complain also when people from those other countries immigrate to the United States to get meaningful work.”

    I think what you miss here my good man, is that most Americans aren’t opposed to ALL immigration. If you asked a generic question like “Should the USA have more illegal immigration from Mexico or less?” you would get a resounding “LESS!!!” However if you asked “Should the USA have more or fewer Mexican software engineers immigrate legally to the US?” you would get “More!”

    The average education level of an illegal immigrant from Mexico is the US equivalent of 8th grade. These are not really the kind of people we need in a post industrial economy. But skimming some top Mexican programmers? Most Americans would be fine with that.

    When you throw out all the nuance and pretend it’s all just because we’re all racists who hate beaners, you miss the real point, which is that nobody wants unskilled immigration from anywhere really. I’m part Mexican, but mostly German. I don’t want 8th grade graduates from Mexico OR Germany moving here. But I’m down with doctors from either place. You get it yet???

    1. These issues are way beyond the attention of most Americans. What they really want is stuff for cheap. And it matters little where stuff is made, or who performs services (and where the services are performed).

      1. “They”?

        Everyone wants the best deal they can get–in every transaction. It’s entirely subjective and the only economic law there is.

        But it’s not just ‘Americans’

        1. Yes, but some countries have economic policy that is producer driven to drive employment rather than consumer driven as in the US.


        2. Everyone wants the best deal they can get–in every transaction. It’s entirely subjective and the only economic law there is.

          Indeed, and I’m pretty sure Mexican’s get this since every time I’ve ever been there they want to haggle.

          1. Yeah and to an extent Trump is right, the Chinese have been butt fucking us for a while now. They have state controlled industries that aren’t driven by market forces but are driven by party desires. So they can afford to lose money on solar panels or cut the workers pay in half for a few years to try and eliminate competitors from other countries. This is happening in steel, rare-earth metals, solar, wind, and other items needed by countries so that China can be the sole source. Then they can drive the prices back up when the free market countries have had their manufacturing bases gutted. It’s obvious. They don’t have to stick to OSHA, environmental regulations, or even market forces because they are a state agent who can pay whatever they want. What can the workers say other than “yes sir!” when they half their pay, when the only other option is death or being kicked out on the street because you didn’t comply with the dictator’s 5 year plan.

      2. These issues are way beyond the attention of most Americans.

        How sad not everybody can be a genius like you! /sarc

        What they really want is stuff for cheap.

        An entirely rational desire. You must be pretty dumb if you don’t “want stuff for cheap”.

        1. The question is, “stuff for cheap” at what cost?

          After all the reading I’ve done, I’m almost positive we end up paying MORE for many (not all) goods we import once you factor in the loss jobs, and the loss of taxes paid into the system by those workers, and the loss of economic activity from those employed people spending their money around in the economy here, etc etc etc. Did I forget to mention all the welfare money we spend on the now jobless people too???

          Basic free trade theory leaves out SOOOOOOOOOOO many important portions of the real world situation it is literally worthless. When a company off shores a product to save nominal amounts, like 10-20% on costs, that is 100% making the US economy as a whole worse off. The small savings don’t make up for the loses. This is why our economy is so shaky overall. It has bright spots (tech, biotech, etc), but it is not very “robust” so to speak.

          When you can save 90% by off shoring, it’s well worth it to do it… But we’ve done it in too many situations where the small cost savings are more than offset by the negative externalities that aren’t directly accounted for in the sticker price at Target. This is because of the welfare state and how socialized most costs are in the USA, but it is how it works for the time being.

          1. Basic free trade theory leaves out SOOOOOOOOOOO many important portions of the real world situation it is literally worthless

            I agree. My point is that the desire to get “cheap stuff” isn’t irrational per se.

            But we’ve done it in too many situations where the small cost savings are more than offset by the negative externalities that aren’t directly accounted for in the sticker price at Target.

            You are absolutely right that “free trade” in our current system causes problems for “the economy as a whole”, but those problems are not externalities. Rather, those problems are mediated through government intervention, regulation, and subsidies. That is, free trade with China is a problem because of our social welfare state, not because any kind of intrinsic problems of trading freely with China.

            Don’t try to obfuscate the source of the problem by calling something an “externality” when it is really just a failure of government policies.

    2. The problem, to some extent, is artificial constraints imposed by government at the urging of US companies/protectionist organizations. For example, the AMA feared that there would a surplus of doctors and lower incomes so the AMA lobbied the Clinton administration and the number of internships were capped at 100,000 per year. Most people don’t realize or that 3 percent of Medicare taxes are used to pay for these internships. Off topic but this would cause more of a problem than it does now with single payer health care. But it does allow foreign universities, particularly in countries like India, to expand while preventing expansion of US schools of medicine.

      1. I can almost understand caps on life or death decision jobs like doctors, but they don’t account for population increase or an aging population. Old the stupid old fogeys who are cheering on the xenophobia don’t realize they need a young populace to pay for their aging asses. Immigrants can help with that. We should be able to bring in more foreign doctors if the AMA keep blocking increases in the number of doctors allowed to exit medical school.

    3. “I don’t want 8th grade graduates from Mexico OR Germany moving here.”

      Why not? There are plenty of people who do. Why should you care about some stranger’s educational background?

  5. it’s useful to discuss our southern neighbor without referring to drug cartels, crime and illegal immigration

    Useful to whom?

    I get the point, but still slapped “Mexico’s Silicon Valley” in the headline for…

    …for illustrating just what a leftist, statist, and dysfunctional shithole Mexico is?

    They complain when U.S. companies create jobs in other countries, then complain also when people from those other countries immigrate to the United States to get meaningful work.

    No “they” don’t. What we complain about is not skilled high tech workers making $100k’s per year, regardless of where they are from, what we complain about is illegal migrants and low skilled workers who vote for more redistribution.

    Any more straw men?

    1. “we complain about is illegal migrants and low skilled workers who vote for more redistribution.”

      Workers voting? The horror.

      1. Fuck off, idiot.

      2. Nice selective and out-of-context quoting there.

        But let’s be clear what you’re advocating. Low skill workers in the US are massive net beneficiaries of redistribution. When they vote for more redistribution (as they do), they vote to send armed government goons into other people’s homes to take their stuff and give it to them. Not only do you seem to think that’s OK, you even want to bring in more people like that through open borders.

        Yes, indeed, I think that’s pretty horrific.

        1. Workers voting? The horror, the horror.

          1. Fuck off, slaver.

  6. And Americans and Mexicans are far more similar culturally than our president would have us believe.

    I don’t recall Trump saying anything about their culture and talking about illegal border crossing is not talking about cultrue

    1. This is very true. When I hang with my Mexican buds I tend to be able to hold a conversation a lot easier than I can with Indians/Chinese/Europeans who always seem more formal and everything has to be polite and PC so no one gets offended.

    2. And Americans and Mexicans are far more similar culturally than our president would have us believe.

      Who cares about their culture? What matters is their economic performance, which is largely driven by their human capital, and Mexico just isn’t doing very well in that regard.

  7. There is no deficit of tech workers. There is a deficit of people willing to go to school 4 to 5 years to become and engineer and be willing to work for $5 an hour.

    1. “There is a deficit of people willing to go to school 4 to 5 years to become and engineer and be willing to work for $5 an hour.”

      Aren’t there doctors who drive cabs for not much more? Refugees from trouble spots etc.

      1. Yeah, that’s because medical lobby groups have successfully pushed the US government into creating massive barriers to entry, while simultaneously giving American doctors a government-guaranteed monopoly with price fixing. In a nutshell, that’s what’s wrong with the US medical system, and progressives and Democrats are hell-bent on doubling down on this stupidity.

  8. Mexico is one of the few bandana republics with (last I checked) a legal libertarian party. All they need is a couple of percent of the vote to start repealing bad laws. American had a huge murder rate when light beer was a shoot-first federal felony during the Herbert Hoover Administration. All Mexico need do is decriminalize plant leaf products and poof! The murder rate falls like it did when the Democrats copied the Liberal Party platform and legalized the Demon Rum. Mexican voters have nobody but themselves to blame if they persist in voting for the initiation of force.

  9. “come up with a question and email it to India, but the developer is asleep.”

    Yup.

  10. Crime issue is different than what we have. They’re much more organized and anyone making a decent amount of money (which doesn’t mean only the very rich down there) is a potential kidnapping target. Additionally the police down there are more likely to be in on it.

    1. “Additionally the police down there are more likely to be in on it.”

      We, IMO justifiably, complain a lot about our dysfunctional police on this site, so it’s nice to take a second to think about how bad it is for 90%+ of the world. Here you have to be stealthy about how you grease the palms of the authorities.

  11. Oh no, Guadalajara won’t do.

  12. The premise claims there are ~1m jobs which those in the US won’t fill, which is bullshit.
    The fact is that there are ~1m jobs (according to the author) which are valued at a wage which will not attract US workers, and this for good reason: Those jobs are easily filled by those who work in places with lower costs-of-living; the jobs are fugitive and not worth the educational costs to those in the US.
    The rest is a pitch for Mexico as opposed to wherever. The ‘They’re asleep’ claim is so much BS; 24 hour service is available most places.

  13. Everything in this article seems like it is written from a stance of ignorance. Having worked across the country in tech I can tell you without hesitation #1 you can easily get your India/Ukrainian team on the phone at any time, the world is smaller than ever. #2 there is NOT a shortage of high tech workers in the US, quite the exact opposite. This is complete BS H1b visas regurgitation. There are millions of high tech workers looking for jobs… the problem is they want about double what you can bring in someone on an H1b and pay them (someone has to pay off that huge burden of student loan debt), or to cut the cost to about 1/5 you can outsource it. I am actually okay with outsourcing, I am not okay with H1bs.

    Also, live in Mexico for more than a month and tell me it is an adequate replacement for US tech…. just wait until you need serious medical attention for you or a loved one… just wait until you get pulled over by the local mexican cops for nothing other than to pad their income… this article is complete waste of words. I mean honest journalist in mexico live in hiding for fear not only of the gangs but of their own government…. I would encourage this “journalist” to go live in mexico for a year and write hard hitting articles about all of the real issues going on… no way you are coming back to your family.

  14. “Right now in the U.S. there is a deficit of 1-million-plus technology jobs,” said iTexico CEO Anurag Kumar. “We’re not lifting and shifting anything from the United States to Guadalajara. We’re helping companies in the U.S. by providing talent that they don’t have here. ? We’re helping U.S. companies build jobs faster.” There are cost savings, but those are secondary, he added.”

    Why didn’t he say 10 million since the writer didn’t fact check? 1 billion jobs!

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