Donald Trump

Here's What Trump Can Learn From Andrew Jackson's First Inaugural Address

Trump's inner circle has embraced the comparison to Jackson, America's first populist president, so he better get to work on the national debt.

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Donald Trump's rise from political outsider to President of the United States, carried by a populist uprising against the ruling class, has drawn comparisons to Andrew Jackson, America's first populist president.

Commentators and historians alike have noted the similarities between Trump and Jackson, and Trump's inner circle seems to have embraced Jackson as something of a role model. Steve Bannon, Trump's senior counselor, told The Hollywood Reporter that he sees Jackson's presidency as guide for how to "build an entirely new political movement."

Trump's inaugural address on Friday was an extension of his populist campaign, and, intentionally or not, reflected Jackson's first inaugural address from 188 years ago. Both promised to reform the federal government, expand national infrastructure, and provide for a more robust military.

When he took the oath of office and delivered his first inaugural, Jackson claimed that his victory was a "demonstration of public sentiment" calling for reforms to "the patronage of the Federal Government," which Jackson said, "have placed or continued power in unfaithful or incompetent hands."

Sound familiar? On Friday, Trump promised that his administration would transfer power back to the people. "A small group in our nation's capital has reaped the rewards of government while the people have borne the cost," he said. "Washington flourished, but the people did not share in its wealth."

Times have changed since 1829, of course. Jackson stepped into White House as the leader of a nation that barely stretched west of the Mississippi River and still allowed human beings to be kept as property. Trump is the leader of a global superpower with a whole different set of problems.

The major difference between the two, at least in terms of how they rose to the presidency, is that Jackson lost his first bid for the White House in 1824—in what's certainly the most controversial election in U.S. history; one that makes Bush V. Gore look tame by comparison—before winning four years later.

Still, the similarities abound. Jackson, like Trump, was a political novice when he ran for president and was very much outside the political establishment of the day. Like Trump, he campaigned against that establishment and had the good fortune of doing so at a moment in history when existing political alliance and battle-lines were being redrawn.

Against those fracturing political alliances, Jackson's name-recognition and fame (he had been a general during the War of 1812 and was hailed as a hero of that conflict's Battle of New Orleans) helped him stand out—in much the same way that Trump used his own name-recognition and fame to rise to the top of a deeply divided Republican Party.

On Friday, Trump bemoaned the loss of "trillions of dollars" rebuilding infrastructure in foreign countries and called for building of "new roads and highways and bridges and airports and tunnels and railways all across our wonderful nation." Jackson, too, promised the then-expanding United States a program of "internal improvement and the diffusion of knowledge, so far as they can be promoted by the constitutional acts of the federal government."

Likewise, on foreign policy, Trump's promise to "seek friendship and goodwill with the nations of the world, but we do so with the understanding that it is the right of all nations to put their own interests first," echoes Jackson. "With foreign nations it will be my study to preserve peace and to cultivate friendship on fair and honorable terms," the seventh president, presiding over a pre-superpower America, said. Perhaps a bit of that 19th century humility would be a good thing for America's foreign policy two centuries later.

Yet, if Trump sees himself as something of a modern day Jacksonian figure (and he has the hair for it, if nothing else), then there are other lessons for Trump to take from Jackson's first inaugural.

For starters, Trump could embrace the long-lost notion that the federal government should largely leave the states to their own devices—and here's some ideas for how he could do that—which Jackson supported. "I hope to be animated by a proper respect for those sovereign members of our Union, taking care not to confound the powers they have reserved to themselves," Jackson said, nodding to the U.S. Constitution's Tenth Amendment.

Those ideas were completely missing from Trump's inaugural—and from the campaign that preceded it. Sure, Trump said he wanted to give power back to the people, but the rest of his speech was a long list of ways he would use the power of the federal government to achieve various things.

If Trump really wants to live up to the Jacksonian mantle, his biggest challenged will undoubtedly be the federal debt—now approaching $20 trillion. Jackson, who spent much of his eight year in office trying to kill one of the nation's first experiments with central banking, had no love for the idea of a national credit card.

In his first inaugural, Jackson promised to spend a considerably share of his time on "management of the public revenue," the strict control of which was essential for a well-function economy, in his mind.

"This I shall aim at the more anxiously both because it will facilitate the extinguishment of the national debt, the unnecessary duration of which is incompatible with real independence, and because it will counteract that tendency to public and private profligacy which a profuse expenditure of money by the Government is but too apt to engender," Jackson said.

Trump made no mention of the national debt on Friday. He did not say anything about reducing the deficit or of the dangers of profuse expenditures, either. There are some encouraging reports that the Trump administration wants to cut some federal spending, but he's got a long way to go.

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  1. Someone please mock up DJT on the $20 bill.

    1. More like the billion dollar bill.

      1. Just do a Google image search for Donald Trump dollar bill.

  2. The racist founder of the Democratic Party?

    Lol

    1. The term “racist” may pretty much be assumed with most Democrats of the time. Those who were uncomfortable with racism fled to other parties as soon as possible.

      1. Not so much the NY Democrats under Martin van Buren, called the locofocos. They were anti slavery non racist

        1. They’re an example of those who migrated to other parties – ultimately the Republicans.

          1. One unchanging thing about Democrats: They think they own black people.

      2. I had always considered AJ a genocide-ist, which is a bit difference than a racist. For example:

        New racist: I do not think we should give the (reds/whites/blacks/gems) special protections under law.
        Old racist: I do not think the (reds/whites/blacks/gems) are equal to my own race.
        Genocide-ist: I do not think the (reds/whites/blacks/gems) are equal to my own race, and must kill them all.

    2. Old Hickory adopted an Indian boy and raised him as his own.He fought side by side with native Americans as well.

      1. I’ve found in my research that people can be viciously racist against black people while being totally cool with Native Americans.

        Anyway, Jackson wasn’t cool with *all* Native Americans.

        1. Racists don’t have to be consistent – they can accept some groups on equal terms and seek to oppress others.

  3. I’m pretty much convinced that we’re never going to get control of the debt or taxes. Too many people freak out if you cut anything, and the MSM will lap up any anecdote to “prove” that said cut has devastating effects on gramma, the arts, medicine, defense, teh childrunz, etc.

    1. I was convinced of that years ago when during one of the government “shutdowns” the media ran a sob story piece about how a 16 year employee of the IRS didn’t know if he would have enough money to put presents under the Christmas tree because of his delayed paycheck.

      1. I believe your example to be the reason why we are in such a fucked situation as Libertarians. There are so many people in this country who rely on the gov for their means that it will be nigh impossible to ever get the gov to quit supplying it.

        1. I’ve resigned myself to the belief that the only way the government will shrink is through revolution. It’s not a happy thought, but I believe it to be accurate.

          1. Revolution would be bad, I think. As cited above, too many people are not independent of the gov to make the post revolution revision of the gov more libertarian friendly.

            A great period of economic boon should be libertarian friendly, it don’t think it will be though. I think the gov would use the excess revenue to tie more people to the gov dole by increasing spending.

            A great financial crisis may do the trick. Probably not considering the type of gov we have had during the past two.

            A great financial crisis caused by government meddling coupled with a revolution that is won by people who understand it’s causes is the best chance. short of that, all I can do is use my meager influence to spread the principles of liberty and hope someone listens.

            1. A great period of economic boon should be libertarian friendly, it don’t think it will be though. I think the gov would use the excess revenue to tie more people to the gov dole by increasing spending.

              See the ’50s – ’90s (’70s exempted)

              A great financial crisis may do the trick. Probably not considering the type of gov we have had during the past two.

              Something would have to be so deep and lasting that the foundations of gov’t crumbled. There’s no way that the existing gov’t would voluntarily scale back. This gets to why I mentioned revolution. It’s not that revolution is the only way, but it’s the quickest way for a gov’t to crumble, and the only remote possibility of libertopia exists with the creation of a new gov’t. Of course, it’s not a guaranteed thing, even in the slightest.

          2. The sad part is that we aren’t even trying. If you want people to depend less on the government, you have to teach them to do so. I think one thing that’s missing in the libertarian argument that people can do for themselves, when The government has been indoctrinating people for decades. Look at the housing crash. Millions of people signed mortgages and loans without truly understanding what they were signing. Some goomba mortgage broker from New York calls you on the phone and promises they can put you in a $500,000 house when you make $30,000 a year and have no savings ( and I knew some of these guys personally) and yet most primary schools do not teach finacnce, economics or basic business courses. Which is more important for most high school stundents? Trigonometry or finance/everyday financial knowledge?

            1. *Some goomba calls and people just say “ok great” and takes his word and signs the loan*

            2. I get your point, but I don’t think the problem lies in what primary schools are teaching. Economic literacy ought to be to taught by ones parents. That’s where I learned it. Part of the fault in our current system is that too many parent are sucking the gov tit due to their own poor decisions. These parents teach their children only what they know.

              1. But not everyone’s parents understand economic literacy. Mine did not. They were lower middle/upper lower class and just didn’t have that type of knowledge or understanding. That is the problem with the libertarian argument. If everyone just fended for themselves immediately, many would not know what to do, especially the lower classes.

                1. We need to use the statist government to our advantage and educate ourselves and our children through parenting, schools, social media, any and every way that we can, and only then can we be less dependent on the government. If you just end social security today, millions would be left with no real clue how to invest in their retirement outside of a 401/Roth, and with another recession or depression, many of them could be left without enough to survive.

                  1. How to use the statist gov to our advantage?

                    I guess the only way to that is to take over the education system, as the left has done. Teach personal responsibility and teach sound economic theory.

                    How to actually take over the education system?

                    Fuck if I know.

                    1. How to actually take over the education system?

                      Charter schools. Provide the best damn charter schools with the most liberty affirming curriculum, and then do everything you can to make them as cheap as possible so that people can afford to attend.

                    2. That is a damn good answer. That is probably why my derpbook feed is so hateful toward Mrs. Devos. The thought of an independent educational system is horrifying to the left.

                2. That’s the problem with getting Libertarian polic enacted. Too many people would be lost as to what to do. I believe in the long everyone would be better off but in the very short term there would be millions of Americans who wouldn’t know what to do.

                  1. The Democrats have successfully created a population segment whose main skill set is working the system. Those people are not going to come along willingly towards self-sufficiency.

              2. I get your point, but I don’t think the problem lies in what primary schools are teaching. Economic literacy ought to be to taught by ones parents. That’s where I learned it.

                1) When the school system is the primary influence of your child for 40 hours per week (classroom time) plus a non-negligible influence for another 15 – 20 hours per week (homework), the parents are only able to have maybe an hour and a half or two hours per day of influence on their child. Toss in some extracurriculars and the kid hanging out with friends a couple times per week, and your parental influence consists of maybe 15 waking hours per week. The structure of school is designed to take control away from the parent and give it to the government.

                2) People are economically disadvantaged by trying to find alternative schooling arrangements. Besides a few limited charter school opportunities, parents are forced to pay for their children’s non-public education along with contributing to the public schools. Most folks simply can’t afford that.

                1. I understand. I, as a parent, don’t entrust the entirety of my boys education to the state. I challenge him on topics he learns in school and encourage him to find truth outside of public school doctrine. I am in a minority of parents in this endeavor. I wish I knew how to make more parents better educators, but I do not.

                  1. short answer, the government should not be responsible for the education of your children, You should be.

            3. Which is more important for most high school stundents? Trigonometry or finance/everyday financial knowledge?

              Spelling?

              1. Sex education.

                I nominate SF as Secretary of SexEd.

            4. Rather than cut trig, it would have been nice if I could have taken my school’s business econ class rather than photography to meet the art requirement. And maybe in college I could have taken that rather than meet a diversity requirement

              1. This is very true. I chose a college that only required me to take an extra three gen eds above what I already had. Honestly, how is my ability to play an instrument (poorly) going to benefit me or society in any way? In the same way, since I have no interest in any type of international travel, high school would’ve benefited me much more if I didn’t have to taken four years of pain called Spanish, or a useless intro science course, or two extra English courses that did not improve my ability to write, or a class designed by a socialist whose sole purpose was indoctrination, or too many American history courses for me to count.

                However, trig has been an extremely useful skill, even though it was not taught well. Trig would’ve made a lot more sense had we been introduced to the complex plane and the complex unit vector $e^(i*theta)$. (I doubt I can insert LaTeX code to make it look nice.)

                Saying that I grew up with a cruel, lazy parent (see: Democrat, def. 3), I agree that the only way to peacefully change things is through charter schools. Because although democrats are so cruel that some don’t even want their own children to succeed, they still value a good education for their children, and a good charter school should easily be able to outperform public schools, so parents will choose charter schools.

            5. yet most primary schools do not teach finacnce, economics or basic business courses

              That’s probably a good simple issue to push on schools. Simple. Makes sense. Not threatening the power that be too much, at least forcing them to defend keeping people ignorant on this subject.

          3. And I’ve resigned myself to having to explore expatriation as my personal answer to this problem.

        2. You mean like Peter Sunderman because he’s tear ducts were extremely active during the shutdown. Maybe libertarians should start policing their own before that start shouting orders at Republicans.

        3. That’s why you should read Cracking the Code by libertarian Pete Hendrickson to how the IS refunds all withheld taxes to those who understand the tax laws.

  4. Jackson had pistol duels,Trump has twitter.

    1. Advantage Trump. Twitter killed fewer people.

  5. OT, I see there’s protests in other countries due to Trump being president. These people really need to take care of themselves. Europe is becoming one whiny bitch.

    1. The paper this morning featured a protest against Trump in Mexico City; ya think maybe the Mexicans have enough home-grown problems that Trump may be a straw man?

      1. They’re probably doing what they accuse Trump of doing – diverting discontent onto evil foreigners.

      2. Get back to me when you have a functional government and tear down the Guatemala border wall, Mexicans.

    2. Three of the women in my (academic) department are attending the local anti-Trump rally. Another actually flew to DC yesterday for the sole purpose of attending the anti-Trump march. I’m pretty sure the cost of airfare & hotel could have fed a hungry family for a week or so.

      1. ZING!

        Did you mention that to her?

        1. No. I have to work with these people and, for the most part, when it’s not politics I enjoy their company so I just ignore this kind of stuff.

          1. Sounds like they’re probably hot. Are they hot?

            1. Three out of four married. One not is, 7. My wife is a 10 so there’s also that.

            2. Also, TIWTANA[cademic]LW

  6. No one we elect has any clue how to lead this country. It’s too big. The bureaucracy and the populace. Why should Trump be any different.

  7. Joaqu?n “El Chapo” Guzman, the ex-leader of the Sinaloa Cartel, was arraigned in federal court on Friday. He was charged with 17 crimes.

    He pleaded not guilty to all of them.

    He’s saying he’s not guilty of breaking any laws, I guess. Because that would be wrong.

    Manuel Noriega’s prison sentence was reduced from 30 years to 17 years for good behavior.

    What a country! People have rights, even nasty, nasty people.

    1. Ken,
      The greatest single attribute to this country is that nasty nasty people have the same rights that you and I do.

      1. I only support the civil liberties of those I agree with

  8. What’s the$19bn industry grads across the country are shaking up?

    Reason’s ads have placed those grads in Schenectady, elsewhere in NY, in Pennsylvania, and even in CA.

  9. I haven’t really been paying attention, can someone tell me what the women’s march is all about?

      1. It’s a planned Hillary victory march, re-targeted. So sad.

    1. Women standing up for their rights and equality. I know plenty on the right will be kicking it, but there are women on the right who voted for Trump who are marching. I think some make it more political than others. I did not vote for Hillary (I lean libertarian), but I think any way that people get involved with our government and peacefully protest or stand up to the status quo is good. The most dangerous people to our society are those that do nothing and just lie there and take it from either side.

      1. *knocking it* – why the hell cant Reason let us edit???

        1. They’re too focused on trying to make something into news to actually fix the comment section. I would like to be able to insert basic LaTeX code, but as far as I know, that isn’t an option either.

      2. Ok, explain to me exactly which “rights” and what aspects of “equality” as these particular items relate to the enumerated powers of the federal government.

        1. Thats the thing i have no idea what they are protesting? What rights are being taken away?

          1. It’s a catchall. They are protesting the denial of any rights they haven’t thought of yet.

      3. What are their goals and what are they looking to accomplish? It becomes meaningless feel goodism without a coherent message and results

        1. Looks,like,someone forgot to log out of their sock puppet.

          1. I guess you missed his lengthy confession in the PM links yesterday that he’s really one of us philosophically, and he’s just been troll-playing for fun until now.

            1. That wouldn’t happen to have anything to do with the guy who’s in office now, would it?

            2. You’ve also missed the part where there is a second person trolling AmSoc using the handle of “american socialist” wherein an upper-case i replaces a lower-case L. Reason uses a sans-serif font, so these two letter are indistinguishable unless you copy the name into a serif font. The “american sociaIist” being responded to here is the false one.

              1. Yup, he’s american soc”ell”alist, not american soc”eye”alist. Checks out.

    2. Nothing in the world is more terrifying to the modern woman than the idea that they might possibly have to pay for their own fucking abortion.

      Our mothers’ generation was a million times tougher and more self-sufficient. If they didn’t have the money, they would just go get a wire coat hanger.

    3. No kidding. I’m watching one now from a bakery chair as I sip my coffee.
      What is the end game?
      What are the objective measures and metrics to determine success, short term and long term?
      What is the roadmap to these objectives?
      What are the hindrances?
      What is it that each and every one want as they hold a sign saying, “Love Trumps Hate.”
      Is it enough to respond, “You’re right. I agree, now let’s call it a day.”
      Aside from angry gripers who yearn for a boss who will cajole them, whilst being too stupid to realize it’s the system, not the person, exactly what is the objective? The specific goal?
      It’s watered down whining, feeding into the albatross that grows to control them. They are female children of all ages, Stockholm Syndrome sycophants to anti-analytical shamans, feeding Leviathan and enjoying the disgusting rape or their own independence.

      1. The goal is to demonize any opposition to any expansion of the state which feeds their demands, much like every other ill-defined march in DC.

      2. The thing is ive noticed they seem to be full of hate

        1. No, no, they’re “angry,” “passionate” and “determined,” that’s totally different.

      3. They want attention and free shit.

        1. +1 That would just be the balls — To have a handful of courageous infil’traitors’ cut the line with that sign held high — “We Want Attention And Free Shit!!!” Of course they’d then claw the poor double agents’ eyes out.

          1. I always liked “Help! I’m surrounded by idiots!”

    4. “I haven’t really been paying attention, can someone tell me what the women’s march is all about?”

      According to the local rag, it seems there are very specific goals:
      “Women descend on DC to push back against new president”
      http://www.sfgate.com/news/pol…..873539.php

      So, no. It’s a barely coherent group of losers whining. And claiming victimhood, since that’s much more satisfying than admitting you’re a whiney loser.

  10. So ultimately your advice is focused on states’ rights and spending.
    Yup, the major parties and populace are really moved by those… Cripe.

  11. The concern i have regarding a financial crisis is that it will result in a command top down economy

    Statists will use it as a power grab

    1. WTF do you think “socialist” means?

      1. Exactly. I dont think wanting a financial crisis is a good idea. The government will be worse

      2. You are talking with “amSock”

        1. That’s a good nick-name for the imposter trolling AmSoc by posting reasonable comments under a facsimile of his handle.

      3. AM does not know what socialist means.

        1. Yeah I do. It’s a less bloody, though not less violent, version of communism.

  12. Jackson sounds about right if one were to take the hyperbole from both sides seriously. No national debt! Almost started the civil war over trade! The voice of the people! Rounded up minorities!

  13. I’m going to the Women’s March today. At least at that protest you stand the chance of actually getting laid as opposed to yesterday’s inaugural, where some jihadi made a speech about American carnage and the attendees looked like they stepped out of a 1992 Winnebago.

    1. note this was a joke as i am married and wife expecting. I wouldnt cheat on her. Rest of my point regarding protestors still stands

      1. You are still here? Awesome… I love you, american sociaiist.

        1. Sorry this is in wrong thread. Meant to do other

    2. I’d double bag it, just to be safe.

      1. Yea maybe men could campaign for free std care for all!

  14. You write that Jackson was a political novice, but he served in the House, Senate, and military governor, in addition to his success as a general.
    In the address, Jackson said of the military, he favored a “gradual increase of the navy,” but did “not seek to enlarge our present establishment” as it related to the standing army.
    By gosh, Jackson vetoed an internal improvement bill on constitutional and fiscal grounds.
    Is Jackson’s statement about imposing his will on the bureaucracy the same as Trump’s? No, it’s qualitatively different. Jackson was saying his victory meant he should put his people in; Trump’s version is entirely abstract, so abstract as to be meaningless.
    True, they both said they want peace in foreign affairs. They also used vowels.

    1. Jackson also followed policies which destroyed the First Bank of the United States.

    2. He also wrote that the country in 1828 barely stretched to the Mississippi River. I guess they cut out the Louisiana Purchase and replaced it with gender sensitivity during his high school American History class.

      These are small things but they show the author to be both ignorant and lazy. It makes the reader question why they should take anything in the article seriously.

    3. Walter Russel Meade is first historian to compare Trump to Jackson ( I ran with it early on in my column for Reno News and Review ) . Modern Jacksonians are different than the original with respect to debt and entitlements. They are communitarian snow, and believe the government should support the people.

  15. Thought it was ironic regarding protesters saying they dont want facism yet were carrying a ussr flag

    1. Well communists hate fascists and vice versa because they’re drawing from the same pool of followers.

      1. Exactly just rival gangs. Most folks would think the dont want facism crowd really mean it for a free society except that isnt correct

  16. As much as the early American boys had a certain exquisite madness that projected the great freedom movement into coming centuries- I’d enjoy a certain not-give-a-fuckery attitude about historical elders as long as the fucking basis for your goddamn political existence is rooted like hard thick cock in a tight pussy in boundless and unrepentant liberty conjoined with adept, agile, and light governance.

    Let the masters of the past rest gently in the folds of eagle ethos as we in the Now quest for new suns cascading brilliance through primal glades rich with lofted spirit and enterprising purpose.

    1. [rises and applauds heartily]

      So…grab the pussy from the inside?

    2. AC, bringing the wisdom.

      I’d kill a puppy to see Trump deliver a speech written by AC.

  17. Here’s What Trump Can Learn From Andrew Jackson’s First Inaugural Address
    Trump’s inner circle has embraced the comparison to Jackson, America’s first populist president, so he better get to work on the national debt.

    1. Its interesting the national debt is now a concern because it wasn’t when Dear Leader Obama was president.
    2. If Trump the Grump wants to emulate Andrew Jackson, then he can eliminate the Federal Reserve Bank. But I doubt it he will be wise enough to do this.
    3. The impression I get is that Trump will probably not do anything to rock the boat and nothing significant will change.
    Time will tell.

    1. Let’s not do the same thing that the Obama mommas did and encourage Trump to behave like he’s an absolute dictator.

      In the original constitution, congress and congress alone had the authority to create currency. Congress voluntarily delegated this power away to the Fed, and only congress can un-delegate it back to themselves.

      1. Right you are.
        I wonder what’s taking the republicans who dominate the numbers in the house and the senate so long to eliminate the Federal Reserve Bank.
        Or are they nothing more than democrats in republican clothing?

  18. Hey, would whoever is still running the Department of Interior Continue to engage in direct action? Showing how basically no one showed up for Jihadi Trump’s induction ceremony was awesome! From WaPo:

    “The Interior Department was ordered Friday to shut down its official Twitter accounts ? indefinitely ? after the National Park Service shared two unsympathetic tweets during President Trump’s inauguration.

    The first noted the new president’s relatively small inaugural crowd compared to the number of people former president Barack Obama drew to the National Mall when he was sworn into office in 2009. The second tweet noted several omissions of policy areas on the new White House website. A Park Service employee retweeted both missives on Friday.”

    1. Forgot to mention it was the obama admin that did this. The first was petty and second was because no admin. It makes no sense to keep obamas policies on white house.gov and were scrubbed by him

      1. You see… when you break character and bitch about Obama you suck. I’ve told you that. I’m flattered that you are bothered enough to do what you are doing because you can’t stand to see anyone criticize Trump, but– really– why waste your time if you’re not any good at parody and satire? Do, what i do… attempt common sense observation without engaging in sophistry and misdirection and you’ll be much better I think.

        1. Whoops this was supposed to be in another message board. Copied to wrong place

          Sorry folks…ignore

        2. >attempt

  19. Nice article, Boehm.

  20. Most self unaware protest sign seen so far on my derpbook feed: “I’m more scared of a pervy white guy than ISIS.”

    There you have it, folks. The woman holding the sign is an idiot. My gay male (genderqueer, fwiw) friend who took the picture, and thinks this is a meritorious statement worthy of sharing, is at least as great an idiot. If anything like this happened in ISIS territory they’d simply roll up the Toyota trucks with the .50 cal and kill every last motherfucker on the mall. At least that’s how the lucky ones would die. But if you mention that you’re islamaphobic and racist.

    1. I hurt myself today just to see if I just feel. I focus on the pain. The only thing that’s real.

      1. I will let you down. I will make you hurt

        1. You could have it all. Their empire of dirt. ISIS will let you down. Their empire of dirt.

          1. ISIS tears a hole
            The old familiar sting.
            They try to kill is all away
            But I remember everything.

        2. I thought it was the Cleveland Browns who let people down.

    2. Makes sense. Because, after all, ISIS are big supporters of women’s rights …

  21. “Jackson, like Trump, was a political novice when he ran for president ” Not true. He had been elected Member of the U.S. House of Representatives from Tennessee’s at-large district as far back as 1796 and US Senator the following year. He was again elected US Senator in 1822.

    1. And as for Trump, though I don’t think he’s held a political office before being President, he was a bigshot developer who rubbed shoulders with political leaders in NYC and NY state and threw his weight around politically to get the best deals (the best!). He goes on about it at length in his books.

  22. “Jackson stepped into White House as the leader of a nation that barely stretched west of the Mississippi River ”

    Someone needs geography lesson – U.S. stretched all the way to the Pacific well before 1829.

    Comments about financial illiteracy remind one of the stated defenses for keeping slavery – that the ignorant darkies could not handle immediate emancipation. Not a few Southerners advocated for educating the slaves before they were set free. Perhaps if the Founding Fathers had adopted some gradual emancipation program the Civil War would have been avoided? As long as state and local governments are setting public school standards, perhaps some can be persuaded to include financial literacy classes?

    1. Technically the Oregon Territory was jointly administered by the US and Great Britain until 1846 although there was no real effective oversight by either country during that period.

  23. As i admitted yesterday i cant stand socialists…they are parasites

    1. Then can you switch handles so I won’t get confused by this “who’s the real american socialist” stuff?

      1. There is no real american socialist. It was all a joke. Pay no attention to my previous lures of socialism

      2. There are two different handles. One is “american socialist”; the other replaced the lowercase L in “socialist” with a capital I.

        Some asshole is trolling us, but damned if I know who or why.

        1. amsoc is an annoying troll, but I think the amsock is actually worse.

        2. Also, he is responding to him/herself in threads, then responding again to that post by saying “oops wrong thread”. Done that multiple times now.

          I’m sure s/he must think this is comedy gold, but it’s really just annoying, and starting to get like Mary with her re-pasting 10,000-word threads over and over before this site had registration.

          Wonder if that similarity means anything.

          1. “But it’s really just annoying”

            I’ve tried to tell Amsock a couple times now, but he won’t listen. I love having a fan club, but it should be done in a way that is effective and funny.

          2. Are they the same person?

  24. In my opinion obama was not a good potus at all. He was way too lefty for me which should really be called statist

  25. In order to show solidarity with minorities who fear Trumps America, I’ve decided I will go to each minority household in the area and burn a large lower case t, to show that we can burn down trumps power and help these minorities feel safer. I encourage you all to do the same.

    1. somebody’s watched South Park

    2. If burning a flag (safely) is protected, then burning a cross should be as well.

  26. Fascinating article about how the CIA changed the ending of Animal Farm and made the Snowball character more menacing in the movie version. There was a lot of money being spent– and still being spent– to convince the working class that an egalitarian society based upon mutual respect and a minimum of armed conflict was and is a totalitarian idea.

    article

    1. Furthermore egalitarianism i think is totalitarian becuase that is only way to make peope equal except for those who get to decide

      1. Egalitarians are the pigs in animal farm

      2. I’m just trying to tell you that rich people and their government lackies sure do seem afraid of a society where people get the health care, food, shelter and the bear necessities of life.

        Here’s how you do satire, amsock…

        But that society would probably inconvenience a billionaire maybe because he couldn’t buy another GulfStream so there’s an obvious downside.

        You see how that works… I don’t really mean that and am using the argument to ridicule all the Randian assholes who think any imposition on a guy that got billions of dollars for inventing Twitter is totalitarianism. Got it?

        1. To be clear i mean rich people shouldn’t ban people from bear necessities like the liberals and tom steyer want to do with cheap energy

          I think all the rich libs should put their money where their mouth is and help thees

        2. Also to be clear im not suggesting rich people stole their money unless you are a rich socialist like soros, fidel, mao, steyer, stalin etc

          Fuck them

          1. The casual conflation of ordinary people like Soros and Steyer with mass murderers like Mao and Stalin was a classic NKVD strategy. Maybe you right-wingers have more in common with commies than you’d like to think.

            1. Sorry actually steyer shouldnt have been put but forgot soros was a nazi collaborator so he should remain with fidel stalin and mao. Also add maduro and kim jong

        3. I’m just trying to tell you that rich people and their government lackies sure do seem afraid of a society where people get the health care, food, shelter and the bear necessities of life.

          No one is afraid of this, as it is perfectly legal in this country to found such a society yourself (and, in fact, it has been done numerous times). What people object to is being forced to participate in and fund such a society against their will, as this dream of yours doesn’t appeal to most people (since the moral hazards it entails usually lead to poverty and/or oppression).

          1. ” moral hazards it entails usually lead to poverty and/or oppression”

            Like Medicare and Social Security or, looking outside the country, any Western European example of where social democracy exists? No one, except amsock, is arguing that Pol Pot is a good example.

            1. Like Medicare and Social Security or, looking outside the country, any Western European example of where social democracy exists?

              Compare the per capita GDP and growth rates of socialist democracies with the US sometime.

              1. “Compare the per capita GDP and growth rates of socialist democracies with the US sometime.”

                I did. Some were higher, some lower. It’s funny… those numbers don’t seem to correlate with overall happiness or well-being when you look at rates of infant mortality and longevity. We’ve talked about this before, but fundamentally now that a fascist is in office can we make a truce between left and right-libertarianism and fight the real enemy?

            2. Meant to clarify since we already have welfare we dont really need more here.

              So to be clear i wasnt saying we needed more programs

              1. What’s your definition of fascism? I’m sure it is not in any dictionary.

      1. I just find Orwell’s example instructive since a fascist, elected by a minority of the people, has been placed in office. Orwell said that he knew his place in a battle between the People and the cops and military. Do you?

        1. Was referring to hitler and fidel here if you didnt pick up on that

          1. Fidel didn’t have nuclear weapons so he couldn’t kill s billion people in an afternoon. The bigger problem now– as opposed to fighting the anti colonialists that rule in Cuba– is how to prevent this president from ceding the argument to people like myself who have been arguing that unchecked capitalism and militarism is just as dangerous as totalitarian communism. If Trump kills as many or more people that GWB did, maybe people might start seeing it my way.

            1. Note this is an example of my previous role of pure hogwash

        2. Fascism – look it up for a big surprise.

  27. Here’s what Trump can learn from Andrew Jackson

    The Mexican Trail of Tears?

    How to be your own bodyguard?

    1. Jackson fought 13 duels. Trump would easily surpass that if he had the chance. Today’s duels are fought with lawyers, not pistols.

      1. “Jackson fought 13 duels. Trump would easily surpass that if he had the chance. Today’s duels are fought with lawyers, not pistols.”

        How sad is that.
        I would prefer lawyers duel with pistols (or at least flamethrowers) instead of going to court.
        Loser pays.

  28. Who cares how you earned the money if it was not by state power and privilege? Libertarian and conservative establishment do not understand the income tax. They believe the 16 amendment overturned McCullough v Maryland when it did not. The Feds still cannot tax that which exists without their permission, such as occupations of common right. Thousands of Americans get full refunds of all withheld state and federal income tax ,even payroll taxes, and librards look the other way and talk about flat tax and fair tax nonsense. You have a right to the fruits of your labor , not by legislative grace, but as a matter of right. See http://www.losthorizons.com

    1. A 16th Amendment Truther – fascinating, let me take a look at your newsletter…

      Uh huh…uh huh…you realize, of course, that you’re completely insane?

  29. I dont understand why folks think the us has no welfare programs. If anything it has TOO MUCH

    1. Federal income tax should be scrapped imo

  30. What add-on do you use in Firefox to deal with the trolls? I know somebody wrote one but I don’t remember the name. Reasonable is Chrome only, it seems.

    1. fascr.. it’s not in the official addon store.

      Here’s the link
      Fascr Download Link

      To install from a file, go to the addons page, click the gear, and click “install addon from file”

  31. Here at the marina there is currently a womens yoga session protesting trump at the gazebo on the end of the dock. Viva la resistance.

  32. It’s a planned Hillary victory march, re-purposed. On the anniversary of Roe vs Wade.

  33. How about contemporaneous accounts of Jackson, say from Mr. Jefferson: “I feel much alarmed at the prospect of seeing General Jackson President. He is one of the most unfit men I know of for such a place. He has had very little respect for laws and constitutions, and is, in fact, an able military chief. His passions are terrible. When I was President of the Senate, he was Senator; and he could never speak on account of the rashness of his feelings. I have seen him attempt it repeatedly, and as often choke with rage. His passions are, no doubt, cooler now; he has been much tried since I knew him, but he is a dangerous man.” TJ to Daniel Webster, 1824, Monticello.

  34. Commentators and historians alike have noted the similarities between Trump and Jackson, and Trump’s inner circle seems to have embraced Jackson as something of a role model. Steve Bannon, Trump’s senior counselor, told The Hollywood Reporter that he sees Jackson’s presidency as guide for how to “build an entirely new political movement.”
    ????? ?? ??
    ????? ????“This I shall aim at the more anxiously both because it will facilitate the extinguishment of the national debt, the unnecessary duration of which is incompatible with real independence, and because it will counteract that tendency to public and private profligacy which a profuse expenditure of money by the Government is but too apt to engender,” Jackson said.

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